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Suppose if we have a number 1.000633, I want to count number of zeros after the decimal point until first nonzero digit in the fraction, the answer should be 3. For 0.002 the answer should be 2.

There is no such function in R that could help. I have explored at Ndec function in package DescTools but it does not do the job.

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up vote 19 down vote accepted

Using regexpr and its match.length argument

attr(regexpr("(?<=\\.)0+", x, perl = TRUE), "match.length")
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3  
Brilliant. Thanks much :) – Annie Feb 22 at 12:47
1  
For x <- 10.2 this returns -1 instead of 0. I had to insert an ifelse statement in my solution to capture a case where it would fail without it. This might be a reason why you consider my implementation complicated. On the other hand, maybe you could consider capturing such cases, too, so that your solution also works for any number. – RHertel Feb 22 at 17:59
1  
@RHertel it always returns -1 for no match. That is the regexpr notation for no match. My solution works for any number. – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 18:05
2  
@RHertel this can be easily fixed in a vectorized way if OP desired, but in this case -1 or 0 seems to be equally fine to me to for no match. – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 18:12
2  
@RHertel Simply using (?<=\\.)0+|$ as the regex should do if you want to get 0 instead of -1. – maaartinus Feb 22 at 22:41

Here's another possibility:

zeros_after_period <- function(x) {
if (isTRUE(all.equal(round(x),x))) return (0) # y would be -Inf for integer values
y <- log10(abs(x)-floor(abs(x)))   
ifelse(isTRUE(all.equal(round(y),y)), -y-1, -ceiling(y))} # corrects case ending with ..01

Example:

x <- c(1.000633, 0.002, -10.01, 7.00010001, 62.01)
sapply(x,zeros_after_period)
#[1] 3 2 1 3 1
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@zx8754 better now..? – RHertel Feb 22 at 12:57
2  
I liked this solution even with 0.001 issue. – zx8754 Feb 22 at 12:59
    
I think you forgot to vectorize it as now it only work on a length one vector only... Myabe this should be ifelse(round(y) == y, -y-1, -ceiling(y)) ? – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 16:26
    
But then it doesn't work for 10.01, don't know... – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 16:39
    
Not columns, just several values, such as x <- c(0.1, 1.0, 1.001) – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 17:24

We can use sub

ifelse(grepl("\\.0", str1), 
    nchar(sub("[^\\.]+\\.(0+)[^0]+.*", "\\1", str1)), NA)
#[1] 3 2 3 3 2

Or using stringi

library(stringi)
r1 <- stri_extract(str1, regex="(?<=\\.)0+")
ifelse(is.na(r1), NA, nchar(r1))
#[1] 3 2 3 3 2

Just to check if it works with any strange cases

str2 <- "0.00A-Z"
nchar(sub("[^\\.]+\\.(0+)[^0]+.*", "\\1", str2))
#[1] 2

data

str1 <- as.character(c(1.000633, 0.002, 0.000633,
                                  10.000633, 3.0069006))
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2  
Thanks again, try with str1 <- as.character(10.000633). – Annie Feb 22 at 12:25
1  
You probably need to edit your first solution as it is wrong. – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 12:31
2  
@akrun there could be any number there, and this should work for all numbers. Almost everyone have a comment under their answers with possible issues, not just you. See here and here for instance – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 12:38
8  
What do you mean with: "Okay, Jaap is also online"? – Procrastinatus Maximus Feb 22 at 12:38
2  
just allow for digits apart from 0 in ther rest of number, like "[^\\.]+\\.(0+)[^0]{1}.*" and it'll be find (though I'll still prefer the numeric approach of RHertel). It's a matter of accurate solution, not of upvote – Cath Feb 22 at 12:38

Using rle function:

#test values
x <- c(0.000633,0.003,0.1,0.001,0.00633044,10.25,111.00012,-0.02)

#result
sapply(x, function(i){
  myNum <- unlist(strsplit(as.character(i), ".", fixed = TRUE))[2]
  myNumRle <- rle(unlist(strsplit(myNum, "")))
  if(myNumRle$values[1] == 0) myNumRle$lengths[1] else 0
})

#output
# [1] 3 2 0 2 2 0 3 1
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Thanks. It works fine until the if I give 0.000633. – Annie Feb 22 at 12:20
    
No, it does not...try using x <- 0.0006330010 – Annie Feb 22 at 12:41
    
This won't work for 1 :) – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 16:55

Another way using str_count from stringr package,

 x <- as.character(1.000633)
 str_count(gsub(".*[.]","",x), "0")
 #[1] 3

EDIT: This counts all zeros after decimal and until first non-zero value.

y <- c(1.00215, 1.010001, 50.000809058, 0.1)
str_count(gsub(".*[.]","",gsub("(?:(0+))[1-9].*","\\1",as.character(y))),"0")
#[1] 2 1 3 0
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1  
This doesn't work correctly for 1.0100001 – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 16:35
    
wow. This question escalated quickly! :). I went with the two cases mentioned by OP. I will revise asap. Thanks @DavidArenburg – Sotos Feb 23 at 12:38
floor( -log10( eps + abs(x) - floor( abs( x ) ) ) )
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What is eps ? – David Arenburg Feb 22 at 16:57
3  
Welcome to Stack Overflow, and thanks for answering this question. Because code with no comments tends not to be very educational, we'd like you to add some explanation of how this answers the question. Thanks! – Toby Speight Feb 22 at 17:06
    
Yes, this is the best solution here. However, you should account for integer log values like this: count0 <- function(x, tol = .Machine$double.eps ^ 0.5) { x <- abs(x); y <- -log10(x - floor(x)); floor(y) - (y %% 1 < tol) } – Roland Feb 23 at 8:35

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