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My boss forbids me to use var as it would cause boxing and slowing down the app.

Is that true?

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17  
Not programming related. Discuss sports somewhere else! –  Deniz Dogan Aug 24 '10 at 10:53
12  
wow. it's people like you who have a valid reason to pee in your bosses coffee :) –  Michael Baldry Aug 24 '10 at 11:38
5  
@Akash Kava: No flamewars in the comments, please –  nikie Aug 24 '10 at 13:13
8  
I write all my software in binary machine code. Anything else would be lazy. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 24 '10 at 13:16
8  
@Akash Kava: Expressing your opinion about why vars shouldn't be used is a flamewar starter. It's subjective and argumentative. Just like expressing your opinion that Java is better than .NET or why dynamic typing shouldn't be used would be. Put it in your blog if you want to discuss it. –  nikie Aug 24 '10 at 14:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 48 down vote accepted

An approach that might work is to write these two methods:

public static void WithInt()
{
    int x = 5;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

public static void WithVar()
{
    var x = 5;
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

Compile, and use ildasm to examine the produced CIL. Show your boss.

edit @ck has done all but the last step for you :)

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10  
+1 for IL proofs –  annakata Aug 24 '10 at 10:55
5  
+1 for being able to show his boss that he is wrong –  Spooks Aug 24 '10 at 11:38
9  
There goes your raise.... :( –  ChaosPandion Aug 24 '10 at 12:39
8  
Ha, or how about just hover the mouse over x (in Visual Studio) and show the boss that it says "int"? –  Dan Tao Aug 24 '10 at 12:41
3  
I suggest some sensitivity when presenting this "in your face!" evidence to your boss - he may genuinely have confused this issue with something else and demonstrating his wrongness won't win favours with him IMO. –  JBRWilkinson Aug 24 '10 at 14:21

Following on from Aakash's answer, here is the IL: (thanks LINQPad)

WithInt:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.5    
IL_0001:  stloc.0     
IL_0002:  ldloc.0     
IL_0003:  call        System.Console.WriteLine
IL_0008:  ret         

WithVar:
IL_0000:  ldc.i4.5    
IL_0001:  stloc.0     
IL_0002:  ldloc.0     
IL_0003:  call        System.Console.WriteLine
IL_0008:  ret      
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8  
Wait...what is that difference I see? Oh nevermind, that was just a spot on my monitor :) –  Brian Gideon Aug 24 '10 at 16:16
    
Hehe.. nice :-) –  cjk Aug 25 '10 at 6:50

Why are so many people cursed with bosses who are dumb? Revolution, brothers!

Your boss needs to read the documentation. var causes the compiler to figure out the variable type by looking at the static type of the initialization expression. It doesn't make the slightest difference at runtime whether you specify the type by hand or you use var and let the compiler figure it out for you.

Update In a comment under the question, Hans Passant asks

can you think of any var initializer that causes boxing without using a cast?

An example of a self-contained expression that forces such a conversion is:

var boxedInt = new Func<int, object>(n => n)(5);

But that is just identical to:

object boxedInt = new Func<int, object>(n => n)(5);

In other words, this doesn't really have anything to do with var. The result of my initializer expression is object, hence var has to use that as the type of the variable. It couldn't be anything else.

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1  
Well, the type inferer could, in theory, interfere a boxed type for a literal. But I guess it doesn't. ++ for rant. –  delnan Aug 24 '10 at 10:53
    
Even if it did the boss is guilty of micro-optimisation, and even if that wasn't true he's guilty of favouring performance over maintenance which is almost universally wrong. Why are the people in charge always the ones who don't know what they're talking about? –  annakata Aug 24 '10 at 10:53
2  
@annakata: It's called "the Peter principle": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Principle –  Fredrik Mörk Aug 24 '10 at 10:54
3  
Even simpler than the Peter Principle is the recursive proof: if your boss is stupider than you, why was he hired? Well, his boss is stupider than him. And so on. –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 24 '10 at 10:57
1  
DISCLAIMER. I am not referring to my present employers! (If anything I have the opposite problem, I'm cursed with a smart boss). –  Daniel Earwicker Aug 24 '10 at 11:10

That's not true at all.

var just means "dear compiler, I know what the type is, and so do you, so let's just move on shall we."

It makes the code shorter and some find this more readable (others find it less readable), but there's no performance penalty whatsoever.

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8  
"dear compiler..." nice :) But point of order I think it means "Dear compiler I don't care what the type is, you decide" –  annakata Aug 24 '10 at 10:55
5  
@annakata: "you decide" is fine too, as long as "surprise me!" is out of the question :) –  Brian Rasmussen Aug 24 '10 at 11:02
1  
@delnan fair enough, there are cases where it may not be evident, but I wouldn't want to define the meaning of var as "surprise me!" –  Brian Rasmussen Aug 24 '10 at 11:10
8  
@annakata: No, it doesn't mean "I don't care what the type is" - it means "I want the type to be the type of the expression on the right hand side of =". There's no guessing involved. The compiler isn't at liberty to choose a type arbitrarily. The specification lays it down very clearly. –  Jon Skeet Aug 24 '10 at 12:14
1  
@Jon: perhaps I spoke too lightly. I'm not suggesting the compiler guesses or that there's any kind of uncertainty here, I'm trying to express that var allows me to not care about the type of the LHS except in terms of what the RHS gives me, whatever that may be. The value is in the decoupling to me. –  annakata Aug 24 '10 at 13:00

Maybe your boss is an old Visual Basic (as in <= 6.0) programmer used to the VARIANT type. If you didn't specify the type of your variable explicitly in your DIM statement, it was a VARIANT which is a sort of union if I recall correctly. You could view this as a sort of "boxing" and "unboxing" when passing such variables to functions.

Sometimes people get confused. Ask your boss about his Visual Basic war stories. Listen, learn and earn some sympathy at the same time! As you leave the office you could point out that the c# compiler figures this stuff out at compile time and that "boxing" isn't an issue anymore.

Don't expect your boss to have to keep up with the newest changes to languages/APIs. This isn't about being dumb. It's about having other stuff to do. His job, for instance.

Edit: As noted in comments below, though, telling you not to use var for the wrong reasons is probably not his job...

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3  
+1 for explaining the bosses's behaviour. It sounds quite likely. But if the boss thinks his knowledge stays relevant without him keeping up, then he is at least a bit dumb. And if he spends his time telling programmers which keywords to use (although they know better than he does), then he isn't doing his job, either. –  nikie Aug 24 '10 at 13:11
    
I don't kow. I think it is reasonable to expect your boss to be educated on the platforms in use at your company especially if he is dictating how you use those platforms. –  Brian Gideon Aug 24 '10 at 16:18
    
@Brian - Exactly. If you're going to dictate keywords, you'd better know what you're talking about. If you don't want to keep up on the latest technical developments, that's fine, but don't micromanage to the point of dictating what keywords are acceptable. –  Joel Mueller Aug 24 '10 at 16:26
    
I will have to add: var is very usefull ......to code fast using var is good, but I believe there are two main path to use var or not. if the right side of your statement is simple then var is nice as in var = new List<class>(); if the right side is a bit too complicated to guess what var IS then don't.... just state what you are specting so maintance becomes easier. –  ramnz May 23 '13 at 22:41

Actually, var can also avoid boxing in some very specific instances.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Int32> testList = new List<Int32>();
    IEnumerator<Int32> enumAsInterface = testList.GetEnumerator();
    var enumAsStruct = testList.GetEnumerator();
}

Results in the following IL:

.method private hidebysig static 
    void Main (
        string[] args
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2050
    // Code size 27 (0x1b)
    .maxstack 1
    .entrypoint
    .locals init (
        [0] class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<int32> testList,
        [1] class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator`1<int32> enumAsInterface,
        [2] valuetype [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator<int32> enumAsStruct
    )

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: newobj instance void class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<int32>::.ctor()
    IL_0006: stloc.0
    IL_0007: ldloc.0
    IL_0008: callvirt instance valuetype [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator<!0> class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<int32>::GetEnumerator()
    IL_000d: box valuetype [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator<int32>
    IL_0012: stloc.1
    IL_0013: ldloc.0
    IL_0014: callvirt instance valuetype [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator<!0> class [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1<int32>::GetEnumerator()
    IL_0019: stloc.2
    IL_001a: ret
} // end of method Program::Main

Note that the 2nd one (the var assignment) knows that this return value is a valuetype (struct) from inside List and can more efficiently use it - even though the contract from List.GetEnumerator returns an IEnumerator. This will remove the boxing operation on that struct and results in more efficient code.

This is why, for instance, in the following code the foreach loop and the first using/while pair doesn't cause garbage (due to a lack of boxing) but the 2nd using/while loop does (since it boxes the returned struct):

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Int32> testList = new List<Int32>();

        foreach (Int32 i in testList)
        {
        }

        using (var enumerator = testList.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
            }
        }

        using (IEnumerator<Int32> enumerator = testList.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
            }
        }
    }
}

Note also that changing this from a "List" to an "IList" will break this optimization since the IList can only infer that an interface of type IEnumerator is coming back. With the List variable the compiler can be smarter and can see that the only valid return value is a [mscorlib]System.Collections.Generic.List`1/Enumerator and can therefore optimize the call to handle this.

While I understand that this is a very limited case, it may be an important one especially on devices that don't do full incremental garbage collection and pause your threads to do a mark/sweep.

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