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I have a method which looks like this

public void setDayIntervals(Days day, List<HourRange> ranges) {
        int hourMask = 0;
        for (HourRange intRange : ranges) {
                     int Start= intRange.getStart();
                     int end = intRange.getEnd();
            }
        }

}

I have to pass List of Ranges from another class.

for(int s = 0; s < adSchedule.getTargets().length ; s++ ){
        List<HourRange> ranges = null;
        int Start =  adSchedule.getTargets(s).getStartHour();
        int end =  adSchedule.getTargets(s).getEndHour()-1;
            if(adSchedule.getTargets(s).getDayOfWeek()==DayOfWeek.MONDAY ){
               // ranges ????????? here i have to pass values Start and End 
               CamSchedule.setDayIntervals(Days.ONE, ranges);
             }
    }

Can someone tell me how to pass ranges in the above method setDayIntervals(Days.one, ramges)

public static class HourRange {
        int start;
        int end;

        public HourRange(int start, int end) {
            super();
            if(start > end) 
                throw new IllegalArgumentException();
            this.start = start;
            this.end = end;
        }

        public int getStart() {
            return start;
        }

        public int getEnd() {
            return end;
        }
}
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What does the constructor for the HourRange class look like? –  Ben Hoffstein Aug 24 '10 at 13:52
    
Is this homework or are you maintaining someone else's code? –  BalusC Aug 24 '10 at 13:57
    
for HourRange: you don't need to call super() because HourRange extends nothing but Object. And you could add private modifiers to start and end to make the class immutable (unless someone uses dirty tricks like reflection..) –  Andreas_D Aug 24 '10 at 14:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to create an HourRange object and add it to the list. Something like this:

 ranges.add(new HourRange(Start, end));

The example assumes that HourRange has this constructor:

 public HourRange(int start, int end) {
   // code to copy start and end to internal fields.
 }

(it has this constructor)

share|improve this answer
    
and @Dean thanks guys u made my day.. U guys rock.. –  jimmy Aug 24 '10 at 14:12

Instead of

List<HourRange> ranges = null;

you probably want

List<HourRange> ranges = new ArrayList<HourRange>();

That gives you a list to add to; until you initialize ranges as a list, nothing can go into that list.

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Or in this case, just Collections.singletonList<HourRange>(new HourRange... –  Mark Peters Aug 24 '10 at 13:59

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