Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a REST-ful WCF service that returns back an XML response. It is comprised of objects that are serializing and de-serializing correctly, with the one exception that my List property on a node is not deserializing correctly. The XML looks like:

<ShippingGroups>
<ShippingGroup>
  <ShippingGroupId>
  b0b4d8a4-ff1f-4f02-a47c-263ef8ac861b</ShippingGroupId>
  <ShippingAddressId>
  63c0b52c-b784-4c27-a3e8-8adafba36add</ShippingAddressId>
  <LineItemIds xmlns:a="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2003/10/Serialization/Arrays">
    <a:string>ccc0f986-52d5-453e-adca-8ff4513c1d84</a:string>
  </LineItemIds>
</ShippingGroup>

The problem arises because my C# class to deserialize this XML is expecting a List LineItemIds. I can get around this by manually removing that namespace and removing the .

Is there another way around this, such that it would look like:

<ShippingGroups>
<ShippingGroup>
  <ShippingGroupId>
  b0b4d8a4-ff1f-4f02-a47c-263ef8ac861b</ShippingGroupId>
  <ShippingAddressId>
  63c0b52c-b784-4c27-a3e8-8adafba36add</ShippingAddressId>
  <LineItemIds>
    <string>ccc0f986-52d5-453e-adca-8ff4513c1d84</string>
  </LineItemIds>
</ShippingGroup>

share|improve this question
    
How do you deserialize the message. That namespace is added by Data contract serializer. –  Ladislav Mrnka Aug 24 '10 at 15:00
    
If you could also show how your DataContract is defined, that could help. –  David Hoerster Aug 24 '10 at 15:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I have an answer for you. Without seeing your DataContracts, I'm kind of guessing as to what you're using and how your data is structured. But here goes...

I am using VS2010, C#, WCF REST and .NET 4 for this.

By default, your collection or array is using a default namespace in order to maintain interoperability when it gets serialized. So, your serialization is behaving as designed.

You can get around this if you create a custom collection and use the CollectionDataContract attribute on it. You then have more control over how it gets serialized, including its namespace. Here's a detailed explanation about this from MSDN.

So I created a custom collection and used the CollectionDataContract namespace as such:

[CollectionDataContract(Namespace="")]
public class StringItem2 : Collection<string>
{
}

There are no properties since this collection will just hold strings.

I then have my DataContract that contains my custom string collection:

[DataContract(Namespace="", IsReference=false)]
public class SampleItem
{
    [DataMember]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string StringValue { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public StringItem2 StringItems2 { get; set; }
}

Now that I've done that, I have my simple WCF RESTful service (GET):

[ServiceContract]
[AspNetCompatibilityRequirements(RequirementsMode = AspNetCompatibilityRequirementsMode.Allowed)]
[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerCall)]
public class Service1
{

    [WebGet(UriTemplate = "{id}")]
    public SampleItem Get(string id)
    {
        SampleItem si = new SampleItem()
        {
            Id = 10,
            StringValue = "foo",
            StringItems2 = new StringItem2() { "Hola", "como", "esta", "usted" }
        };
        return si;
    }

}

When I request this service (http://localhost:xxxx/Service1/10), I get the following XML as a response:

<SampleItem xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
 <Id>10</Id> 
 <StringItems2>
  <string>Hola</string> 
  <string>como</string> 
  <string>esta</string> 
  <string>usted</string> 
 </StringItems2>
 <StringValue>foo</StringValue> 
</SampleItem>

Hopefully this helps. Please let me know if there are additional details that I missed or if there's more to the question. I'll update my answer accordingly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.