Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there a better way to do implement a simple lock like below?

I only want to to the "DOSOMETHING" if it's not already being run. Should I be using reall locks here? if I use lock will that cause everything to queue up and wait for the lock to release? (that's not what I want!)

Thanks

  bool running = false;

  void DataDisplayView_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
  {
    // if (!this.initialSetDone)  
     if (!running)
     {
        this.running = true;

        //DOSOMETHING

        this.running = false;
     }
 }
share|improve this question
    
I've read your question a number of times, and its not at all clear what you're trying to do. Can you provide some background or more complete description of what your code should be doing? – Juliet Aug 24 '10 at 15:43
1  
All of the answers so far generally lie in one of two camps 1) you are using mulitple threads and you are describing a thread synchronization problem or 2) you are not using multiple threads and you are describing a method reentrancy problem. Can you make the clarification in your question by updating it? Based on what I see so far I have assumed the later. Is that correct? – Brian Gideon Aug 24 '10 at 16:08
    
@ Juliet, sorry an incorrect use of "initialSetDone" instead of "running" confused this issue. @Brian, yest this was a reentrancy problem alright. Answers seem to indicate that the approach I was using was correct, but can be improved by using a try catch – AidanO Aug 25 '10 at 7:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you do not want to use locks here. This is not a thread synchronization problem. This is a method reentrancy problem.

You might try something like this.

bool running = false; 

void DataDisplayView_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) 
{ 
  if (!this.running)
  {
    this.running = true; 
    try
    {
      //DOSOMETHING 
    }
    finally
    {
      this.running = false; 
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that two threads could get through the check if(!running) before the first manages to set running=true. In this case you end up with 2 threads running DOSOMETHING at the same time. – Grzenio Aug 24 '10 at 15:45
2  
@Grzenio: True, but the question never suggested that multiple threads where involved and the signature of the method in question seems to confirm that. This is none other than a Control.Paint event executing on a single thread...the UI thread. Given that I think it is more safe to assume that the OP was describing a reentrancy problem as opposed to a thread synchronization problem. – Brian Gideon Aug 24 '10 at 16:03
    
@Brian: fair point – Grzenio Aug 24 '10 at 19:10
    
Brian, I don't get it. Is there a way to have two simultaneous calls of the same method other then calling it twice from different threads? – Dmitry Ornatsky Aug 24 '10 at 19:29
2  
@Dmitry: There's another way also: recursion (and I don't mean explicitly calling DataDisplayView_Paint, but rather calling some methods on the control in question which raise the Paint event again, triggering this code a 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. time). – Dan Tao Aug 25 '10 at 7:12

You just need to synchronise (lock is the simplest way) bits of the code:

bool running = false;
readonly object padlock = new object();

  void DataDisplayView_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
  {

     if (!this.initialSetDone)
     {
        lock(padlock)
        {
          if(running) return;
          running = true;
        }
        try {

          //DOSOMETHING
        }
        finally
        {
          lock(padlock)
          {
            this.running = false;
          }
        }
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
DOSOMETHING methods tend to throw ;) – Dmitry Ornatsky Aug 24 '10 at 15:21
1  
I always make my lock objects 'readonly'. – row1 Aug 24 '10 at 15:30
    
Added try/finally and readonly, cheers. – Grzenio Aug 24 '10 at 15:32
    
@ grzenio, will this cause queuing up waiting for padlock to become free? – AidanO Aug 25 '10 at 7:06
    
@AidanO, you only need the lock to make sure that the check and assignment or running are done atomically, there is not really going to be any real waiting here. – Grzenio Aug 25 '10 at 8:56

The best way is to use a try/finally block

try { 
  this.running = true;
  ...
} finally {
  this.running = false;
}

Real thread locks are only needed if this method is called from multiple threads. Given that it appears to be a paint event handler this is unlikely as controls are affinitized to a single thread.

share|improve this answer

Am I missing something? The code as you've posted it does not seem to do anything. That is, the code will run whether or not running is true.

Generally, any code that tries to "lock" itself like this...

if (!running)
{
    running = true;

    try
    {
        // This code should not call itself recursively.
        // However, it may execute simultaneously on more than one thread
        // in very rare cases.
    }
    finally
    {
        running = false;
    }
}

...is perfectly good, as long as you're in a single-threaded scenario. If you're running multi-threaded code, problems can arise because you are assuming that no two threads will reach the if (!running) line at the same time.

The solution in multi-threaded code is to use some form of atomic switch. I've used the AutoResetEvent for this purpose:

var ready = new AutoResetEvent(true);

if (ready.WaitOne(0))
{
    try
    {
        // This code will never be running on more than one thread
        // at a time.
    }
    finally
    {
        ready.Set();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dan, well spotted, I'll edit the code – AidanO Aug 25 '10 at 6:59

Note that if you're having reentrancy on your paint callback, you've got a more serious problem. Paint handlers should be blocking your message pump (and should complete relatively quickly), so you should never see this case. The only exception is if you call Application.DoEvents() from somewhere in your paint handler, which you really shouldn't be doing.

share|improve this answer
    
good spot Dan, maybe the paint was a poor example. – AidanO Aug 25 '10 at 6:59

You shift varaible names in the middle, so I'm going to assume you wanted:

  bool running = false; 

  void DataDisplayView_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) 
  { 
     if (!this.running) 
     { 
        this.running = true; 

        //DOSOMETHING 

        this.running = false; 
     } 
 }

The problem you have here is that if DataDisplayView_Paint can be called from multiple threads, then it is possible that between the if (!this.running) and the this.running = true; the other thread could jump in and start DOSOMETHING (because running is still false). Then the first thread will resume, and start DOSOMETHING again. If that is a possiblity, then you will need to use a real lock.

share|improve this answer

If you use Monitor.TryEnter instead you could specify a timeout, in which case the result you get is such that:

  • only one thread can run the DOSOMETHING at a time
  • subsequent calls will try to get the lock and give up after the timeout clause

If you don't provide with a timeout, or set the timeout to 0, this call won't block and will return immediately (maybe that'd suit your requirement better?):

if (!this.initialSetDone && Monitor.TryEnter(_lock))
{
   // DOSOMETHING
}

Alternatively, you can make the running variable volatile so that you will always get the latest value stored in the variable:

private volatile bool running;

if (!this.initialSetDone && !this.running)  // #1
{
   this.running = true;
   try
   {
     // DOSOMETHING
   }
   finally
   {
     this.running = false;
   }
}

The second approach won't queue up subsequent calls, but there is the possibility that two threads will both hit #1 and evaluate that it's safe to proceed then both end up running DOSOMETHING, though it's highly unlikely.

share|improve this answer

I only want to to the "DOSOMETHING" if it's not already being run

Your question doesn't have enough information, so I can't help but make assumptions about your code.

  • My first assumption is that, based on the signature DataDisplayView_Paint(object s, PaintEventArgs e), your code runs on the GUI thread.

  • My second assumption is that your code DOSOMETHING is synchronous.

With that in mind, here's version of your code which guarantees we only run DOSOMETHING if its not already being run:

void DataDisplayView_Paint(object s, PaintEventArgs e)
{
    //DOSOMETHING
}

The GUI thread will only process one message at a time, and your DataDisplayView_Paint method does not exit until DOSOMETHING completes. If you're doing anything with the GUI like drawing to a Graphics object or changing labels, then this code won't get invoked from more than one thread -- and if it does, .NET will throw an exception. In other words, you don't need any synchronization.


Let's assume DOSOMETHING runs asyncronously -- now we have an interesting problem, but its very easy to solve, and you don't need any bools.

Essentially, all you're doing is disabling your event handler while DOSOMETHING runs, then re-enabling it. Instead of using a bool, unhook and rehook your event handler as needed:

void DataDisplayView_Paint(object s, PaintEventArgs e)
{
    DataDisplayView.Paint -= DataDisplayView_Paint;
    DoSomethingAsynchronously(); // re-hooks event handler when completed
}

void DoSomethingAsychronously()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(() =>
    {
        try
        {
            // DOSOMETHING
        }
        finally
        {
            // may need a lock around this statement
            DataDisplayView.Paint += DataDisplayView_Paint;
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.