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UPDATE: I added an answer to this question which incorporates almost all the suggestions which have been given. The original template given in the code below needed 45605ms to finish a real world input document (english text about script programming). The revised template in the community wiki answer brought the runtime down to 605ms!

I'm using the following XSLT template for replacing a few special characters in a string with their escaped variants; it calls itself recursively using a divide-and-conquer strategy, eventually looking at every single character in a given string. It then decides whether the character should be printed as it is, or whether any form of escaping is necessary:

<xsl:template name="escape-text">
<xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
<xsl:param name="len" select="string-length($s)"/>
<xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="$len >= 2">
        <xsl:variable name="halflen" select="round($len div 2)"/>
        <xsl:variable name="left">
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, 1, $halflen)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:variable>
        <xsl:variable name="right">
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, $halflen + 1)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:variable>
        <xsl:value-of select="concat($left, $right)"/>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:choose>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '&quot;'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;\&quot;&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '@'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;@&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '|'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;|&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '#'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;#&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '\'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;\\&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '}'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;}&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '&amp;'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;&amp;&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '^'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;^&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '~'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;~&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '/'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;/&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '{'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;{&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:otherwise>
                <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
            </xsl:otherwise>
        </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

This template accounts for the majority of runtime which my XSLT script needs. Replacing the above escape-text template with just

<xsl:template name="escape-text">
    <xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
    <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
</xsl:template>

makes the runtime of my XSLT script go from 45 seconds to less than one seconds on one of my documents.

Hence my question: how can I speed up my escape-text template? I'm using xsltproc and I'd prefer a pure XSLT 1.0 solution. XSLT 2.0 solutions would be welcome too. However, external libraries might not be useful for this project - I'd still be interested in any solutions using them though.

share|improve this question
1  
Good question (+1). See my answer for a 17 times + improvement in speed :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 17:00
    
@Frerich-Raabe, @Tomalak, @Alejandro: See my next answer -- additional speedup of 1.5 times over @Frerich-Raabe's latest combined suggestions solution. :) The total speedup by now must be over 100 times. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 21:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Another (complementary) strategy would be to terminate the recursion early, before the string length is down to 1, if the condition translate($s, $vChars, '') = $s is true. This should give much faster processing of strings that contain no special characters at all, which is probably the majority of them. Of course the results will depend on how efficient xsltproc's implementation of translate() is.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Very good reasoning. PS: I just noticed that I gave the godfather of XSLT his very first up-vote on SO! Great to see you here! :) –  Tomalak Aug 24 '10 at 20:46
    
+1 The reasoning is sound; implementing this trick brought the runtime down from 5812ms (this is after implementing Tomalaks and Dimitre's suggestions) to 657ms. I was so surprised about this that I had to diff the output with the previous output. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 24 '10 at 20:54
1  
@Dr. Kay: +1 5812ms to 657ms really shows an improvement! –  user357812 Aug 24 '10 at 21:06
1  
@Tomalak - is there a badge for that? :-) There should be! –  LarsH Aug 25 '10 at 16:40
    
Wow... Welcome to SO, Dr. Kay! And of course, your answers deserve to be known. +1. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 26 '10 at 3:17

A very small correction improved the speed in my tests about 17 times.

There are additional improvements, but I guess this will suffice for now ... :)

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:my="my:my">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:variable name="vChars">"@|#\}&amp;^~/{</xsl:variable>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="text()" name="escape-text">
  <xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
  <xsl:param name="len" select="string-length($s)"/>

  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="$len >= 2">
        <xsl:variable name="halflen" select="round($len div 2)"/>
        <xsl:variable name="left">
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, 1, $halflen)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:variable>
        <xsl:variable name="right">
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, $halflen + 1)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:variable>
        <xsl:value-of select="concat($left, $right)"/>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:choose>
            <xsl:when test="not(contains($vChars, $s))">
             <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '&quot;'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;\&quot;&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '@'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;@&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '|'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;|&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '#'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;#&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '\'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;\\&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '}'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;}&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '&amp;'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;&amp;&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '^'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;^&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '~'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;~&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '/'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;/&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '{'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;{&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
        </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
you da man on this –  Mark Schultheiss Aug 24 '10 at 18:01
    
+1 Trivial but reasonable change. Things can be easy to improve, at times. :-) –  Tomalak Aug 24 '10 at 18:13
    
@Dimitre: +1 for improvement. –  user357812 Aug 24 '10 at 18:35
1  
@Frerich Raabe: The identity transform and matching text nodes are there to make this stylesheet works with any input (you've not provided one). The improvement is in discarding firstly characters not match those wich needs to be replaced. That's the meaning of the first when/@test="not(contains($vChars, $s))" –  user357812 Aug 24 '10 at 20:04
1  
@Frerich: It's the when test="not(contains(...))" (i.e. your otherwise case) moved to the first position within the choose. The most common condition must be checked first, to avoid redundant checks that almost always fail. –  Tomalak Aug 24 '10 at 20:05

Here is a more improved version, based on @Dimitre's answer:

  <xsl:template match="text()" name="escape-text">
    <xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
    <xsl:param name="len" select="string-length($s)"/>

    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$len &gt; 1">
        <xsl:variable name="halflen" select="round($len div 2)"/>
        <!-- no "left" and "right" variables necessary! -->
        <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
          <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, 1, $halflen)"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
        <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
          <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, $halflen + 1)"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:choose>
          <xsl:when test="not(contains($vChars, $s))">
            <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
          </xsl:when>
          <xsl:when test="contains('\&quot;', $s)">
            <xsl:value-of select="concat('&quot;\', $s, '&quot;')" />
          </xsl:when>
          <!-- all other cases can be collapsed, this saves some time -->
          <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:value-of select="concat('&quot;', $s, '&quot;')" />
          </xsl:otherwise>
        </xsl:choose>
      </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
  </xsl:template>

Should be another tiny bit faster, but I have not benchmarked it. In any case, it's shorter. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
@Tomalak: Also there is a " case that sould be &quot;\&quot;&quot;. And I think that you have a typo in $len gt; 1. As we talk before, that could be $len > 1 –  user357812 Aug 24 '10 at 19:14
    
@Alejandro: Yeah, that's a typo. I'll fix it. Thanks for the hint with the extra case, too. –  Tomalak Aug 24 '10 at 19:22
    
+1: Thanks for your response! The idea of not even needing left and right is great, I'm stunned this didn't occur to me. Also, collapsing the xsl:choose is a nice idea; even if it wouldn't help performance at all, it needs less code and doesn't sacrifice readability. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 24 '10 at 19:36
1  
I think that without left and right variable, this should be faster, because the differences between RTF to string conversion and adjacent text nodes serialization. –  user357812 Aug 24 '10 at 20:36
1  
@Tomalak, @Frerich-Raabe, @Alejandro: Yes, this is an obvious refactoring. Other things to try: 1. I believe that having a series of <xsl:value-of> is faster than <xsl:value-of select="concat(...)"/> 2. In $vChars also order the chars according to their decreasing frequency. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 20:54

For what it's worth, here's my current version of the escape-text template which incorporates most of the (excellent!) suggestions which people have given in response to my question. For the record, my original version took about 45605ms on average on my sample DocBook document. After that, the runtime was decreased in multiple steps:

  • Removing the left and right variable together with the concat() call brought the runtime down to 13052ms; this optimization was taken from Tomalak's answer.
  • Moving the common case (which is: the given character doesn't need any special escaping) first in the inner <xsl:choose> element brought the runtime further down to 5812ms. This optimization was first suggested by Dimitre.
  • Aborting the recursion early by first testing whether the given string contains any of the special characters at all brought the runtime down to 612ms. This optimization was suggested by Michael.
  • Finally, I couldn't resist doing a micro optimization after reading a comment by Dimitre in Tomalak's answer: I replaced the <xsl:value-of select="concat('x', $s, 'y')"/> calls with <xsl:text>x</xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="$s"/><xsl:text>y</xsl:text>. This brought the runtime to about 606ms (so about 1% improvement).

In the end, the function took 606ms instead of 45605ms. Impressive!

<xsl:variable name="specialLoutChars">"@|#\}&amp;^~/{</xsl:variable>

<xsl:template name="escape-text">
    <xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
    <xsl:param name="len" select="string-length($s)"/>
    <xsl:choose>
        <!-- Common case optimization: 
             no need to recurse if there are no special characters -->
        <xsl:when test="translate($s, $specialLoutChars, '') = $s">
            <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
        </xsl:when>
        <!-- String length greater than 1, use DVC pattern -->
        <xsl:when test="$len > 1">
            <xsl:variable name="halflen" select="round($len div 2)"/>
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, 1, $halflen)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
            <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
                <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, $halflen + 1)"/>
                <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$len - $halflen"/>
            </xsl:call-template>
        </xsl:when>
        <!-- Special character -->
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:text>&quot;</xsl:text>
            <!-- Backslash and quot need backslash escape -->
            <xsl:if test="$s = '&quot;' or $s = '\'">
                <xsl:text>\</xsl:text>
            </xsl:if>
            <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
            <xsl:text>&quot;</xsl:text>
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
    
@Frerich-Raabe: 76 times speedup -- not bad, is it? :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 21:24
    
@Frerich-Raabe: On my test files this transformation is 1.45 times faster than the solution in my answer -- I believe we can do even better. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 21:29
    
@Dimitre: It's amazing, yes. :-) –  Frerich Raabe Aug 24 '10 at 21:29
    
I think you could refactor this answer in a more compact code with just one choose and test in this order: translate..., $len > 1, quot and backslash test, otherwise. –  user357812 Aug 25 '10 at 21:27
    
Congratulations! This has been one of the more entertaining (and satisfying!) threads on this site. Also, seeing the 1% net improvement for the "string literal" vs. "string function" change made me smile. ;) –  Tomalak Aug 25 '10 at 21:58

How about using EXSLT? The String functions in EXSLT have a function called replace. I think it is something that is supported by quite a few XSLT implementations.

share|improve this answer
    
That's true; unfortunately, replace is not an option in my case since one of the characters to be replaced (") is used as the escape character itself. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 24 '10 at 19:33
    
@Frerich, can you elaborate on that? Why would that prevent you from using replace()? However, that point is pretty well moot, because the only implementations of EXSLT's replace function listed are in XSLT, thus not in principle more efficient than doing it in XSLT yourself. –  LarsH Aug 25 '10 at 17:06
    
@LarsH: Sorry, my comment was imprecise. Here's an example: consider the string "\ and keep in mind that " should be replaced with "\"" and ` should be replaced with "\\"`; no matter which order you execute these two replacements, the result is incorrect since the second replacement will also replace characters which were introduced by the first replacement. [I give up, I can't get the markup right with these bloody backslashes!] –  Frerich Raabe Aug 25 '10 at 18:28
    
@Frerich, reading the spec on that function, it sounds like the replacements are supposed to be independent of each other, not operating on the output of each other. "The str:replace function works by replacing each occurence [sic] of a string in the search string list within the first argument string [emphasis mine] by the equivalently positioned node in the replacement node list." I.e. it replaces occurrences in the original string, not occurrences in an intermediate result after applying some replacements. Too much detail here to put in a comment... I'll add an answer. –  LarsH Aug 25 '10 at 18:32
    
@Frerich, Never mind, I won't add an answer... I was going to say that exsl replace() takes a nodeset of search strings and a nodeset of replacement strings, so in theory, you can make multiple replacements in one call, and they all search the original string, not each other's output. However there is no known implementation at all of the most recent version of the spec for that function, and while there is an XSLT implementation of an earlier version, I don't find the spec for it. So I'm not going to bother testing it. –  LarsH Aug 25 '10 at 18:47

Update: I fixed this to actually work; now, it is not a speedup!

Building off @Wilfred's answer...

After fiddling with the EXSLT replace() function, I decided it was interesting enough to post another answer, even if it's not useful to the OP. It may well be useful to others.

It's interesting because of the algorithm: instead of the main algorithm worked on here (doing a binary recursive search, dividing in half at each recursion, pruned whenever a 2^nth substring has no special characters in it, and iterating over a choice of special characters when a length=1 string does contain a special character), Jeni Tennison's EXSLT algorithm puts the iteration over a set of search strings on the outside loop. Therefore on the inside of the loop, it is only searching for one string at a time, and can use substring-before()/substring-after() to divide the string, instead of blindly dividing in half.

[Deprecated: I guess that's enough to speed it up significantly. My tests show a speedup of 2.94x over @Dimitre's most recent one (avg. 230ms vs. 676ms).] I was testing using Saxon 6.5.5 in the Oxygen XML profiler. As input I used a 7MB XML document that was mostly a single text node, created from web pages about javascript, repeated. It sounds to me like that is representative of the task that the OP was trying to optimize. I'd be interested to see hear what results others get, with their test data and environments.

Dependencies

This uses an XSLT implementation of replace which relies on exsl:node-set(). It looks like xsltproc supports this extension function (possibly an early version of it). So this may work out-of-the-box for you, @Frerich; and for other processors, as it did with Saxon.

However if we want 100% pure XSLT 1.0, I think it would not be too hard to modify this replace template to work without exsl:node-set(), as long as the 2nd and 3rd params are passed in as nodesets, not RTFs.

Here is the code I used, which calls the replace template. Most of the length is taken up with the verbose way I created search/replace nodesets... that could probably be shortened. (But you can't make the search or replace nodes attributes, as the replace template is currently written. You'll get an error about trying to put attributes under the document element.)

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:str="http://exslt.org/strings"
    xmlns:foo="http://www.foo.net/something" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:import href="lars.replace.template.xsl"/>

    <foo:replacements>
        <replacement>
            <search>"</search>
            <replace>"\""</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>\</search>
            <replace>"\\"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>@</search>
            <replace>"["</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>|</search>
            <replace>"["</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>#</search>
            <replace>"["</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>}</search>
            <replace>"}"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>&amp;</search>
            <replace>"&amp;"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>^</search>
            <replace>"^"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>~</search>
            <replace>"~"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>/</search>
            <replace>"/"</replace>
        </replacement>
        <replacement>
            <search>{</search>
            <replace>"{"</replace>
        </replacement>
    </foo:replacements>

    <xsl:template name="escape-text" match="text()" priority="2">
        <xsl:call-template name="str:replace">
            <xsl:with-param name="string" select="."/>
            <xsl:with-param name="search"
                select="document('')/*/foo:replacements/replacement/search/text()"/>
            <xsl:with-param name="replace"
                select="document('')/*/foo:replacements/replacement/replace/text()"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

The imported stylesheet was originally this one.

However, as @Frerich pointed out, that never gave the correct output! That ought to teach me not to post performance figures without checking for correctness!

I can see in a debugger where it's going wrong, but I don't know whether the EXSLT template never worked, or if it just doesn't work in Saxon 6.5.5... either option would be surprising.

In any case, EXSLT's str:replace() is specified to do more than we need, so I modified it so as to

  • require that the input parameters are already nodesets
  • as a consequence, not require exsl:node-set()
  • not sort the search strings by length (they're all one character, in this application)
  • not insert a replacement string between every pair of characters when the corresponding search string is empty

Here is the modified replace template:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
   xmlns:str="http://exslt.org/strings">
   <!-- By Lars Huttar
    based on implementation of EXSL str:replace() by Jenni Tennison.
    http://www.exslt.org/str/functions/replace/str.replace.template.xsl
    Modified by Lars not to need exsl:node-set(), not to bother sorting
    search strings by length (in our application, all the search strings are of
    length 1), and not to put replacements between every other character
    when a search string is length zero.
    Search and replace parameters must both be nodesets.
    -->

   <xsl:template name="str:replace">
      <xsl:param name="string" select="''" />
      <xsl:param name="search" select="/.." />
      <xsl:param name="replace" select="/.." />
      <xsl:choose>
         <xsl:when test="not($string)" />
         <xsl:when test="not($search)">
            <xsl:value-of select="$string" />
         </xsl:when>
         <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:variable name="search1" select="$search[1]" />
            <xsl:variable name="replace1" select="$replace[1]" />

            <xsl:choose>
               <xsl:when test="contains($string, $search1)">
                  <xsl:call-template name="str:replace">
                     <xsl:with-param name="string"
                        select="substring-before($string, $search1)" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="search"
                        select="$search[position() > 1]" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="replace"
                        select="$replace[position() > 1]" />
                  </xsl:call-template>
                  <xsl:value-of select="$replace1" />
                  <xsl:call-template name="str:replace">
                     <xsl:with-param name="string"
                        select="substring-after($string, $search)" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="search" select="$search" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="replace" select="$replace" />
                  </xsl:call-template>
               </xsl:when>
               <xsl:otherwise>
                  <xsl:call-template name="str:replace">
                     <xsl:with-param name="string" select="$string" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="search"
                        select="$search[position() > 1]" />
                     <xsl:with-param name="replace"
                        select="$replace[position() > 1]" />
                  </xsl:call-template>
               </xsl:otherwise>
            </xsl:choose>
         </xsl:otherwise>
      </xsl:choose>
   </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

One of the side benefits of this simpler template is that you could now use attributes for the nodes of your search and replace parameters. This would make the <foo:replacements> data more compact and easier to read IMO.

Performance: With this revised template, the job gets done in about 2.5s, vs. my 0.68s for my recent tests of the leading competitor, @Dimitre's XSLT 1.0 stylesheet. So it's not a speedup. But again, others have had very different test results than I have, so I'd like to hear what others get with this stylesheet.

share|improve this answer
    
That's Excellent (+1). Could you, please, send me your data file? Just a single unit and also provide the repetition factor. I think I can improve further on based on your solution... :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 26 '10 at 3:13
    
Thanks for your efforts! Interestingly, I recently decided to use a <replacements> data table as well, so that the string mapping is actually data to the function and not encoded into an <xsl:choose>. This made the function quite a bit slower (on one document I currently have at hand it went from 3201ms to 3779ms) but IMHO it's easier to read and to extend. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 26 '10 at 9:35
    
I must be doing something wrong here; unfortunately, your function is a lot slower on my sample document (the one I gave in my answer needs 3201ms, yours needed 88921ms; maybe it's xsltproc to blame, but in any case, your script didn't yield the same output as the other scripts either. It didn't seem to actually replace any of the special characters. I'm sure it's a mistake on my side. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 26 '10 at 9:43
    
@Dimitre, thanks. :-) I've uploaded the data file to huttar.net/lars-kathy/tmp/so3558407.zip @Frerich, wow, that's a horrible slowdown. I'll try running this script with xsltproc and see if I get the same results. Saxon does have some clever optimizations and maybe that's part of the performance difference we're seeing. –  LarsH Aug 26 '10 at 11:27
    
Strange, this morning when I try to run the various implementations, only my XSLT 2.0 version works properly... @Dimitre's most recent XSLT 1.0 version and this EXSL version fail to replace anything. I'll be working on it... –  LarsH Aug 26 '10 at 11:48

After @Frerich-Raabe published a community wiki answer which combines the suggestions so far and achieves (on his data) a speedup of 76 times -- big congratulations to everybody!!!

I couldn't resist not to go further:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:variable name="specialLoutChars">"@|#\}&amp;^~/{</xsl:variable>

 <xsl:key name="kTextBySpecChars" match="text()"
  use="string-length(translate(., '&quot;@|#\}&amp;^~/', '') = string-length(.))"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="text()[key('kTextBySpecChars', 'true')]" name="escape-text">
  <xsl:param name="s" select="."/>
  <xsl:param name="len" select="string-length($s)"/>

  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="$len >= 2">
        <xsl:variable name="halflen" select="round($len div 2)"/>
        <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
            <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, 1, $halflen)"/>
            <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$halflen"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
        <xsl:call-template name="escape-text">
            <xsl:with-param name="s" select="substring($s, $halflen + 1)"/>
            <xsl:with-param name="len" select="$len - $halflen"/>
        </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:when test="$len = 1">
        <xsl:choose>
            <!-- Common case: the character at hand needs no escaping at all -->
            <xsl:when test="not(contains($specialLoutChars, $s))">
                <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:when test="$s = '&quot;' or $s = '\'">
                <xsl:text>&quot;\</xsl:text>
                <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
                <xsl:text>&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:otherwise>
                <xsl:text>&quot;</xsl:text>
                <xsl:value-of select="$s"/>
                <xsl:text>&quot;</xsl:text>
            </xsl:otherwise>
        </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:when>
  </xsl:choose>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

This transformation achieves (on my data) a further speedup of 1.5 times. So the total speedup should be more than 100 times.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your efforts! Unfortunately using xsl:key here doesn't improve the situation for me, the contrary is the case. That aside, couldn't you have used $specialLoutChars in the kTextBySpecChars key? That way it wouldn't lack the "{" character either. Should xsl:key "compile" the given XPath, so that you can use it more quickly? I'm curious what the reasoning behind this change is. –  Frerich Raabe Aug 24 '10 at 22:33
    
@Frerich-Raabe: THat means that your data is very different from mine. The key will help if you have many text nodes, you are escaping all (or most) of them and some of them don't contain special characters. In XSLT 1.0 an <xsl:key> definition isn't allowed to contain variable references: w3.org/TR/xslt#key "It is an error for the value of either the use attribute or the match attribute to contain a VariableReference." –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 24 '10 at 23:04
    
@Frerich-Raabe, since we're doing so much benchmarking, can you post a sample data set somewhere (maybe @Dimitre too) so we can compare apples to apples? –  LarsH Aug 25 '10 at 19:01
1  
@Alejandro: Mine (for Saxon 9) are: -Xms1024M -Xmx1024M -jar C:\Xml\Parsers\Saxon\9.0.0.4\J\saxon9.jar -t -repeat:3 -o %out% %xml% %xsl% %param[ name="value"]% –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 26 '10 at 19:31
1  
@Alejandro: Mine (for Saxon 6.5.5) are: %xml% %xsl% %out%%param[ name="value"]% and I am starting Saxon.bat: @echo off "C:\Program Files\Java\jre1.6.0_04\bin\java" com.icl.saxon.StyleSheet -t %1 %2 > %3 pause –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 26 '10 at 19:34

OK, I'll chip in. Though not as interesting as optimizing the XSLT 1.0 version, you did say that XSLT 2.0 solutions are welcome, so here's mine.

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:template name="escape-text" match="text()" priority="2">
        <xsl:variable name="regex1">[@|#}&amp;^~/{]</xsl:variable>
        <xsl:variable name="replace1">"$0"</xsl:variable>
        <xsl:variable name="regex2">["\\]</xsl:variable>
        <xsl:variable name="replace2">"\\$0"</xsl:variable>
        <xsl:value-of select='replace(replace(., $regex2, $replace2),
                              $regex1, $replace1)'/>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

This just uses a regexp replace() to replace \ or " with "\" or "\"" respectively; composed with another regexp replace() to surround any of the other escapable characters with quotes.

In my tests, this performs worse than Dimitre's most recent XSLT 1.0 offering, by a factor of more than 2. (But I made up my own test data, and other conditions may be idiosyncratic, so I'd like to know what results others get.)

Why the slower performance? I can only guess it's because searching for regular expressions is slower than searching for fixed strings.

Update: using analyze-string

As per @Alejandro's suggestion, here it is using analyze-string:

<xsl:template name="escape-text" match="text()" priority="2">
    <xsl:analyze-string select="." regex='([@|#}}&amp;^~/{{])|(["\\])'>
        <xsl:matching-substring>
            <xsl:choose>
                <xsl:when test="regex-group(1)">"<xsl:value-of select="."/>"</xsl:when>
                <xsl:otherwise>"\<xsl:value-of select="."/>"</xsl:otherwise>
            </xsl:choose>
        </xsl:matching-substring>
        <xsl:non-matching-substring><xsl:value-of select="."/></xsl:non-matching-substring>
    </xsl:analyze-string>
</xsl:template>

While this seems like a good idea, unfortunately it does not give us a performance win: In my setup, it consistently takes about 14 seconds to complete, versus 1 - 1.4 sec for the replace() template above. Call that a 10-14x slowdown. :-( This suggests to me that breaking and concatenating lots of big strings at the XSLT level is a lot more expensive than traversing a big string twice in a built-in function.

share|improve this answer
    
@LarsH: You are transversing the string twice. –  user357812 Aug 26 '10 at 15:03
    
@LarsH: You should try analize-string with ([@|#}&amp;^~/{])|(["\\]) and then for matching substring choose when regexp-group(1) quoting, otherwise quoting and backslash, for not matching substring just output. –  user357812 Aug 26 '10 at 15:18
    
@Alejandro, good point about traversing the string twice. Still I thought that would be faster than splitting and concatenating so many strings in high-level XSLT. I will try your analyze-string suggestion. –  LarsH Aug 26 '10 at 15:45
    
@Alejandro see my update to this answer, regarding analyze-string. –  LarsH Aug 26 '10 at 17:16
    
@LarsH: That's extrange! Testing with Altova (I couldn't set rigth Saxon for benchmarking), the analize-string solutions run 50% faster than replace solution. –  user357812 Aug 26 '10 at 18:07

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