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Could I write the following logic in a simpler, more easy-to-read way? The below does what I need, but it is very messy:

if (IsChanged == true)
{
    return;
}

else if (Status == "" && IsChanged == false) // Executed when the close (x) button is pressed, as the Status string is not yet set to a real value...
{
    CancelClose();
}

else if (IsChanged == false && Status == "saving") // saving logic falls to here...
{
    // IsChanged = false;
}

Thanks

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12  
== (true|false) is of the devil. Of the devil, I say! –  delnan Aug 24 '10 at 16:31
    
Yes, go with !IsChanged over IsChanged == False –  Skilldrick Aug 24 '10 at 16:34
1  
Use string.Empty not "" to avoid unnecessary object creation –  O.O Aug 24 '10 at 16:37
1  
where tested, IsChanged can never be false, so this is uneccessary test! –  Charles Bretana Aug 24 '10 at 19:42

11 Answers 11

if (isChanged) return;

switch (Status) {
   case "": 
       CancelClose(); 
       break;
   case "saving": 
       // IsChanged = false;
       break;
}

This is about as neat as it gets. Note that because you return if isChanged is true you can further on always assume that isChanged is false.

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I think that this is the most effective solution, fixing both sides. –  Jookia Aug 24 '10 at 16:30
    
"if (isChanged == true)" can be rewritten as "if (isChanged)". –  TrueWill Aug 24 '10 at 16:34
    
could save the == true part –  Eton B. Aug 24 '10 at 16:34
    
I didnt think! I just copied his ischanged == true :( –  Raynos Aug 24 '10 at 17:45

This is a bit cleaner:

if (IsChanged)
{

}
else if (Status == "saving")
{

}
else if (Status == "")
{

}
else
{

}

I would recommend you use an enum to represent the status. This will allow your code to be strongly typed.

public enum Status
{
    Closing,
    Saving,
    Changed,
}

Then you can use a nice switch statement to decide what action to take.

switch (_status)
{
    case Status.Saving:
        break;
    case Status.Closing:
        break;
    case Status.Changed:
        break;
    default:
        break;
}
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Doesn't check Status == "" in the else case –  recursive Aug 24 '10 at 16:29
2  
+1 for using enum. –  Charles Aug 24 '10 at 18:02
if(IsChanged)
  return;

if(Status == "saving")
{
    // save      
}
else if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(Status))
{
    CancelClose();    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Absolutely. No point checking if isChanged is false when it would have returned if it were true. –  Skilldrick Aug 24 '10 at 16:29
    
Doesn't check Status == "" in the else case –  recursive Aug 24 '10 at 16:30
2  
This would fail if more options for status are available –  Eton B. Aug 24 '10 at 16:32
    
Thought about it some more and edited the answer to be true to the original implementation. –  Anna Lear Aug 24 '10 at 17:12

Since you return if IsChanged==true, you don't need it in the other ifs.

    if (IsChanged == true)
        return;

    switch (Status)
    { 
       case "":
        CancelClose();
        break;
       case "saving":
        break;
    }
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1  
I tend to avoid the switch statement for a small number of strings. –  ChaosPandion Aug 24 '10 at 16:29
    
I think the advantages of the switch statement in this case is that. You can easily see how the flow will be depending on the Status (and no other variables), and one can easily imagine adding more cases depending on new values of Status. –  HaskellElephant Aug 24 '10 at 16:41

yes:

   if (IsChanged) return;
   if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(Status)) CancelClose();
share|improve this answer
1  
That's incomplete. You're missing a spot for the actual saving logic -- which you don't want to fall into if CancelClose is called. –  Anna Lear Aug 24 '10 at 16:29
    
What I have above is equivilent to the sample presented, as nothing happens in the last block anyway. (unless the status property has some side effects besides returning a string value, which would be very very bad...) –  Charles Bretana Aug 24 '10 at 19:40
  • cut the first else if to just if. If IsChanged is true the "else" will never be reached.
  • remove the IsChanged==false from your other ifs because they are always true.
  • Think about enums instead of strings for your status.

I'd recommend:

if (IsChanged)
{
      return;
}

if (CurrentStatus == Status.None) 
{
     CancelClose();
     return;
}

if (CurrentStatus == Status.Saving) 
{
  //     IsChanged = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    if(!IsChanged) {
        if (Status == "saving") // saving logic falls to here...
        {
            //     IsChanged = false;
        } 
        else if (Status == "") // Executed when the close (x) button is pressed, as the Status string is not yet set to a real value...
        {
            CancelClose();
        }
    } else {
        return;
    }
share|improve this answer

It can be simplifed in to

    if (IsChanged)
    {
        return;
    }

    else if (Status == "") // Executed when the close (x) button is pressed, as the Status string is not yet set to a real value...
    {
        CancelClose();
    }

    else if (Status == "saving") // saving logic falls to here...
    {
        //     IsChanged = false;
    }

You do not need the == True in the first check, as it already is true or false. you do not need to check for false in the other choices because if it is not true it must be false.

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if (IsChanged) return;

if (Status == "saving")
{
  //IsChanged = false;
}
else if (Status = "")
{
  CancelClose();
}

I'd avoid beginning your variable names with uppercase.

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You can take everything out of the large else block. –  recursive Aug 24 '10 at 16:31
    
Maybe IsChanged and 'Status' are a properties? –  Jerod Houghtelling Aug 24 '10 at 16:33
    
These are property names, and property names usually begin with a capital letter. The alternative would be something like a private _isChanged. –  Thorsten79 Aug 24 '10 at 16:34
if (IsChanged) 
   return;

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(Status)) // better use this unless you would like a
   CancelClose();                 // nullPointerException

else if (Status.equals("Saving"))
   // whatever you want for save
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I'm not familiar with c#, but it supports the ternary operator

condition ? first_expression : second_expression;

Since I'm not familiar with c#, I won't try to re-write your code, but in any case, the ternary operator can lead to pleasing concision in some places.

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