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i need to make a dictionary in javascript like this

i dont remember the exact notation, but it was something like:

states_dictionary={ CT=[alex,harry], AK=[liza,alex], TX=[fred, harry] ........ }

is there such a thing in javascript?

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2  
See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/130543/… –  Manoj Govindan Aug 24 '10 at 17:16
2  
The answer you accepted is very wrong. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Aug 3 '12 at 5:31
    
@EsbenSkovPedersen Which errors did you notice in that answer? –  Anderson Green Sep 1 '13 at 4:19
    
I see it is edited after I commented. It seems : was missing –  Esben Skov Pedersen Sep 2 '13 at 11:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 52 down vote accepted

This is an old post, but I thought I should provide an illustrated answer anyway.

Use javascript's object notation. Like so:

states_dictionary={ 
     "CT":["alex","harry"], 
     "AK":["liza","alex"], 
     "TX":["fred", "harry"]
};

And to access the values:

states_dictionary.AK[0] //which is liza

or you can use javascript literal object notation, whereby the keys not require to be in quotes:

states_dictionary={ 
     CT:["alex","harry"], 
     AK:["liza","alex"], 
     TX:["fred", "harry"]
};
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8  
it's worth noting that the first example should yield the same object in both languages using exactly same syntax except the closing ';'. states_dictionary={ "CT":["alex","harry"], "AK":["liza","alex"], "TX":["fred", "harry"] } –  Denis C Jul 1 '13 at 18:10

There are no real associative arrays in Javascript. You can try using objects:

var x = new Object();
x["Key"] = "Value";

However with objects it is not possible to use typical array properties or methods like array.length. At least it is possible to access the "object-array" in a for-in-loop.

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2  
What about the performance? is looking up a key in an object constant time? –  Saher Oct 9 '11 at 2:04
3  
Since o["key"] is equivalent to o.key in Javascript the performance is almost the same. However performance depends on the Javascript Engine / Webbrowser. There are quite a lot differences between these, especially in the older versions. –  Vash Oct 13 '11 at 9:05

Have created a simple dictionary in JS here:

function JSdict() {
    this.Keys = [];
    this.Values = [];
}

// Check if dictionary extensions aren't implemented yet.
// Returns value of a key
if (!JSdict.prototype.getVal) {
    JSdict.prototype.getVal = function (key) {
        if (key == null) {
            return "Key cannot be null";
        }
        for (var i = 0; i < this.Keys.length; i++) {
            if (this.Keys[i] == key) {
                return this.Values[i];
            }
        }
        return "Key not found!";
    }
}


// Check if dictionary extensions aren't implemented yet.
// Updates value of a key
if (!JSdict.prototype.update) {
    JSdict.prototype.update = function (key, val) {
        if (key == null || val == null) {
            return "Key or Value cannot be null";
        }
        // Verify dict integrity before each operation
        if (keysLength != valsLength) {
            return "Dictionary inconsistent. Keys length don't match values!";
        }
        var keysLength = this.Keys.length;
        var valsLength = this.Values.length;
        var flag = false;
        for (var i = 0; i < keysLength; i++) {
            if (this.Keys[i] == key) {
                this.Values[i] = val;
                flag = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (!flag) {
            return "Key does not exist";
        }
    }
}



// Check if dictionary extensions aren't implemented yet.
// Adds a unique key value pair
if (!JSdict.prototype.add) {
    JSdict.prototype.add = function (key, val) {
        // Allow only strings or numbers as keys
        if (typeof (key) == "number" || typeof (key) == "string") {
            if (key == null || val == null) {
                return "Key or Value cannot be null";
            }
            if (keysLength != valsLength) {
                return "Dictionary inconsistent. Keys length don't match values!";
            }
            var keysLength = this.Keys.length;
            var valsLength = this.Values.length;
            for (var i = 0; i < keysLength; i++) {
                if (this.Keys[i] == key) {
                    return "Duplicate keys not allowed!";
                }
            }
            this.Keys.push(key);
            this.Values.push(val);
        }
        else {
            return "Only number or string can be key!";
        }
    }
}

// Check if dictionary extensions aren't implemented yet.
// Removes a key value pair
if (!JSdict.prototype.remove) {
    JSdict.prototype.remove = function (key) {
        if (key == null) {
            return "Key cannot be null";
        }
        if (keysLength != valsLength) {
            return "Dictionary inconsistent. Keys length don't match values!";
        }
        var keysLength = this.Keys.length;
        var valsLength = this.Values.length;
        var flag = false;
        for (var i = 0; i < keysLength; i++) {
            if (this.Keys[i] == key) {
                this.Keys.shift(key);
                this.Values.shift(this.Values[i]);
                flag = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (!flag) {
            return "Key does not exist";
        }
    }
}

The above implementation can now be used to simulate a dictionary as:

var dict = new JSdict();

dict.add(1, "one")

dict.add(1, "one more")
"Duplicate keys not allowed!"

dict.getVal(1)
"one"

dict.update(1, "onne")

dict.getVal(1)
"onne"

dict.remove(1)

dict.getVal(1)
"Key not found!"

This is just a basic simulation. It can be further optimized by implementing a better running time algorithm to work in atleast O(nlogn) time complexity or even less. Like merge/quick sort on arrays and then some B-search for lookups. I Didn't give a try or searched about mapping a hash function in JS.

Also, Key and Value for the JSdict obj can be turned into private variables to be sneaky.

Hope this helps!

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Use JavaScript objects. You can access their properties like keys in a dictionary. This is the foundation of JSON. The syntax is similar to Python dictionaries. See: JSON.org

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An old question but I recently needed to do an AS3>JS port, and for the sake of speed I wrote a simple AS3-style Dictionary object for JS:

http://jsfiddle.net/MickMalone1983/VEpFf/2/

If you didn't know, the AS3 dictionary allows you to use any object as the key, as opposed to just strings. They come in very handy once you've found a use for them.

It's not as fast as a native object would be, but I've not found any significant problems with it in that respect.

API:

//Constructor
var dict = new Dict(overwrite:Boolean);

//If overwrite, allows over-writing of duplicate keys,
//otherwise, will not add duplicate keys to dictionary.

dict.put(key, value);//Add a pair
dict.get(key);//Get value from key
dict.remove(key);//Remove pair by key
dict.clearAll(value);//Remove all pairs with this value
dict.iterate(function(key, value){//Send all pairs as arguments to this function:
    console.log(key+' is key for '+value);
});


dict.get(key);//Get value from key
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1  
Nice and useful library! I have added a get function, which I thought was missing and fixed some minor syntax issues (missing semicolon etc). Here's the modified fiddle: Dictionary in JSFiddle –  Matt Oct 7 '13 at 13:21
    
Good job mate, dunno why that wasn't in there! –  MickMalone1983 May 12 at 13:34

Firefox 13+ provides an experimental implementation of the map object similar to the dict object in python. Specifications here.

It's only avaible in firefox, but it looks better than using attributes of a new Object(). Citation from the documentation :

  • An Object has a prototype, so there are default keys in the map. However, this can be bypassed using map = Object.create(null).
  • The keys of an Object are Strings, where they can be any value for a Map.
  • You can get the size of a Map easily while you have to manually keep track of size for an Object.
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