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What is the best way to read an unsigned 24-bit integer from a C# stream using BinaryReader?

So far I used something like this:

private long ReadUInt24(this BinaryReader reader)
{
    try
    {
        return Math.Abs((reader.ReadByte() & 0xFF) * 256 * 256 + (reader.ReadByte() & 0xFF) * 256 + (reader.ReadByte() & 0xFF));
    }
    catch
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

Is there any better way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Some quibbles with your code

  • You question and signature say unsigned but you return a signed value from the function
  • Byte in .Net is unsigned but you're using signed values for arithmetic forcing a later use of Math.Abs. Use all unsigned calculations to avoid this.
  • IMHO it's cleaner to shift bits using shift operators instead of multiplication.
  • Silently catching the exception is likely the wrong idea here.

I think it's more readable to do the following

private static uint ReadUInt24(this BinaryReader reader) {
    try {
        var b1 = reader.ReadByte();
        var b2 = reader.ReadByte();
        var b3 = reader.ReadByte();
        return 
            (((uint)b1) << 16) |
            (((uint)b2) << 8) |
            ((uint)b3);
    }
    catch {
        return 0u;
    }
}
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Yes, more readable, but I wonder whether it is really a good idea to silently catch an exception here? (Of course, I don't know how the method is going to be used, but it doesn't leave a good feeling). –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Aug 24 '10 at 17:35
    
@0xA3 agree it's likely the wrong idea and noted in my edit. –  JaredPar Aug 24 '10 at 17:37
    
Thanks, but why is sliently catching the exception likely the wrong idea here? –  Alon Gubkin Aug 24 '10 at 17:42
    
@Alon because it treats error conditions, such as IOExceptions, no differently than valid reads of the value 0. The two are indistinguishable from the perspective of the caller. This may be your intent but it's not clear –  JaredPar Aug 24 '10 at 17:48
    
This is great. Now I just need the opposite method for writing a 24 bit value to a stream. –  CoderDennis Sep 4 at 20:10

This looks pretty elegant to me.

private static long ReadUInt24(this BinaryReader reader)
{
  try
  {
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4];
    reader.Read(buffer, 0, 3);
    return (long)BitConverter.ToUInt32(buffer, 0);
  }
  catch 
  { 
    // Swallowing the exception here might not be a good idea, but that is a different topic.
    return 0;
  }
}
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The main reason I prefer JaredPar's answer is the explicit placement of the bytes. If, for example, the bytes were in a different order his solution is easy to fix, but this one would cause some problems trying to fix that up. –  Dolphin Aug 24 '10 at 18:06
    
JaredPar's answer executes faster as well. –  Brian Gideon Aug 24 '10 at 18:22

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