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I encountered a problem when I use TreeMap.

    Map<Integer, Integer> a = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    a.put(5,1);
    a.put(3,2);
    a.put(4,3);
    int target = 7;
    System.out.println(target - a.get(5)); //line 6
    for(Map.Entry b : a.entrySet()){
        System.out.println(target - b.getValue()); //line 8
    }

The code above gave me an compile error. However, when I change the line 8 to this:

    Map<Integer, Integer> a = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    a.put(5,1);
    a.put(3,2);
    a.put(4,3);
    int target = 7;
    System.out.println(target - a.get(5)); //line 6
    for(Map.Entry b : a.entrySet()){
        System.out.println(target - (int) b.getValue()); //line 8
    }

Then it works. Could anyone give me some ideas why I don't need any change in line 6 but need convert an Integer to int in line 8?

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closed as off-topic by Ferrybig, Holger, user902383, Lashane, user1803551 Feb 24 at 18:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Ferrybig, Holger, user902383, Lashane, user1803551
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

up vote 41 down vote accepted

You ignored the "raw type" warning in the for statement. It should be:

    for(Map.Entry<Integer,Integer> b : a.entrySet()) {
        ...

The raw type would cause getValue() to return Object. If you provide the type parameters then the compiler knows it will return Integer, and this will get unboxed automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh!!! Thanks very much! – youngyjd Feb 24 at 7:43
1  
Do you need to define the type there or would the diamond operator (Map.Entry<>) be enough (which was introduced with Java 7) as a.entrySet() already defines the type? Using nothing at all like in the OP of course causes the error. – Thomas Feb 24 at 11:54
2  
@Thomas - You need to define the type. Just using the diamond operator will give you a compile-time error. – Guy G Feb 24 at 12:03
3  
@Thomas one could of course use map.foreach((k, v) -> dostuff), which would not require types. – Boris the Spider Feb 24 at 15:16

There are more than one operations that are underneath (int) b.getValue(). First getValue() returns Object and then that is casted to Integer which is then unboxed to int . a.get() in it's own immediately returns Integer since you declared a with Integer in <> (see https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Map.html#get(java.lang.Object) it returns the V type).

The target - b.getValue() didn't compile because it was int - Object operation which is not defined for operator - . That is why you have to do cast to (int) .

Following wont work even though b is referring to the object that is Integer.

Integer a = 1;
Object  b = a;
System.out.println(3 - b); // compile time error "bad operand types for binary operator '-'"

Following works

Integer a = 1;
Object  b = a;
System.out.println(3 - a);

Also works

Integer a = 1;
Object  b = a;
System.out.println(3 - (int) b); //this is when you say to compiler not to worry since you are sure that object reference refers to the object that is Integer.

Though if at runtime b doesn't refer to int the cast will fail. Even if it did compile in the first place.

Integer a = 1;
String  s = "shouldn't work at runtime";
Object  b = s;
System.out.println(3 - (int) b); //this  will compile but fail at runtime
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