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My unsafe method accepts a collection byte[]s. All of these byte[]s are of the same size.

I need to iterate over them all, searching for certain patterns. The search is inherently reinterpret-cast style: at each offset, I need to consider a value as if it were a float, a double, a short, an int, etc. So getting a byte* for each input byte[] and incrementing it on each iteration seems like a natural approach.

Unfortunately I can't find any way to create a collection of byte* - or, more specifically, to initialize it from a collection of arrays. Any ideas?

Here's a somewhat contrived version of the task:

static unsafe void SearchIteration(List<byte[]> arrays, byte[] resultArr)
{
    fixed (byte* resultFix = resultArr)
    {
        byte* resultPtr = resultFix;
        byte*[] pointers = new byte*[arrays.Count];

        <some code to fix all the arrays and store the pointers in "pointers">

        int remaining = resultArr.Length;
        while (remaining > 0)
        {
            <look at resultPtr and each of the pointers and update *resultPtr>

            remaining--;
            for (int i = 0; i < pointers.Length; i++)
                pointers[i]++;
        }
    }
}

Essentially the question is how to initialize pointers with the addresses of arrays, while pinning the arrays so that GC doesn't move them.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is your collection of objects, and what are in the byte[] ? –  Raynos Aug 24 '10 at 20:23
    
Do you really need to have all byte[] in arrays to be pinned at the same time, or could you process them one after another? –  dtb Aug 24 '10 at 20:28
    
@Raynos sorry for confusion, I simplified a bit and forgot to remove one reference to "objects". Gone now. Just byte[]s. –  romkyns Aug 24 '10 at 20:32
    
@dtb yes, I need to compare them all to each other. For example, at a given offset, check if all offsets interpreted as floats represent the same float within a range of, say, +/- 10.0f. –  romkyns Aug 24 '10 at 20:34
    
BitConverter is too slow for your purpose? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  dtb Aug 24 '10 at 20:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use GCHandle.Alloc() from System.Runtime.InteropServices:

var handles = new GCHandle[arrays.Count];
byte*[] pointers = new byte*[arrays.Count];
for(int i = 0; i < arrays.Count; ++i)
{
    handles[i] = GCHandle.Alloc(arrays[i], GCHandleType.Pinned);
    pointers[i] = (byte*)handles[i].AddrOfPinnedObject();
}
try
{
    /* process pointers */
}
finally
{
    for(int i = 0; i < arrays.Count; ++i)
    {
        handles[i].Free();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That pins the objects. But where does the pointer point to (the array content or the CLR object header of the array object)? –  dtb Aug 24 '10 at 20:37
    
it points to exatly what you are expecting - first array element –  max Aug 24 '10 at 20:37
    
Thanks max, this works. Forgot to accept earlier. –  romkyns Oct 11 '10 at 23:58

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