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In Python I can write:

for i, val in enumerate(lst):
    print i, val

The only way I know how to do this in PHP is:

for($i = 0; $i < count(lst); $i++){
    echo "$i $val\n";
}

Is there a cleaner way in PHP?

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

Don't trust PHP arrays, they are like Python dicts. If you want safe code consider this:

<?php
$lst = array('a', 'b', 'c');

// Removed a value to prove that keys are preserved
unset($lst[1]);

// So this wont work
foreach ($lst as $i => $val) {
        echo "$i $val \n";
}

echo "\n";

// Use array_values to reset the keys instead
foreach (array_values($lst) as $i => $val) {
        echo "$i $val \n";
}
?>

-

0 a 
2 c 

0 a 
1 c 
share|improve this answer
2  
+1: the second example using array_values is basically what enumerate does (of course enumerate also accepts iterators, so you'd need a bit more code to handle that case)... – ircmaxell Aug 24 '10 at 22:04
    
In addition to @ircmaxell's comment, PHP has iterator_to_array($iterator, false) which will create an array from the iterator. false tells it to not use the iterator's keys, but to use an incrementing value like array_values generates. – Izkata Apr 23 '12 at 18:11

Use foreach:

foreach ($lst as $i => $val) {
    echo $i, $val;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Only works if the array is not associative and/or the keys are continuous. – Felix Kling Aug 24 '10 at 21:17
    
@Felix Kling: Huh? foreach works for all Traversable objects and arrays. What are you referring to? – ircmaxell Aug 24 '10 at 22:02
2  
@ircmaxell: Python's enumerate() counts from a start value (default 0) to #listElements. You on the other hand are just outputting the keys of the array. If the array is associative, then it is not equivalent to the enumerate() function. See Tomasz answer. – Felix Kling Aug 24 '10 at 22:36

Yes, you can use foreach loop of PHP:

 foreach($lst as $i => $val)
       echo $i.$val;
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I think you were looking for the range function.

One use case could be the pagination where (assume) you have 150 items and you want to show 10 items per page so you have 15 links. So to create those links you can use:

    $curpage=3;$links=15;$perpage=10; //assuming.

    <?php foreach(range(1,$links) as $i):?>
        <?php if($i==$curpage):?>
             <li class="active"><a class="active"><?=$i?></a><li>
        <?php else:?>
             <li><a href="paging_url"><?=$i?></a><li>
        <?php endif ?>
    <?php endforeach ?>
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With the introduction of closures in PHP 5.3 you can also write the following:

array_map(function($i,$e) { /* */ }, range(0, count($lst)-1), $lst);

Of course this only works if the array is stored in a variable.

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In python enumerate has start argument, to define start value of enumeration.

My solution for this in php is:

function enumerate(array $array, $start = 0)
{
    $end = count($array) -1 + $start;

    return array_combine(range($start, $end), $array);
}

var_dump(enumerate(['a', 'b', 'c'], 6000));

The output is:

array(3) {
  [6000]=>
  string(1) "a"
  [6001]=>
  string(1) "b"
  [6002]=>
  string(1) "c"
}
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