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I have a SQL query:

SELECT b . * , CONCAT( GROUP_CONCAT( c.name ) ) categories, CONCAT( GROUP_CONCAT( c.id ) ) cids
FROM books b
JOIN categories_of_books cb ON b.id = cb.book_id
JOIN categories c ON c.id = cb.category_id
GROUP BY b.id

And it returns to me in categories alias all categories of books and in cids all categories ids.

And when i adding WHERE clause like this:

WHERE c.id = 10

In categories I`ll have only one category and it is clear. But how can i write SQL query which will return me all categories of books in categories alias with limiting condition:

WHERE c.id = 10

[EDIT 1]

Only variant:

SELECT b . * , GROUP_CONCAT( c.name ) categories, GROUP_CONCAT(CAST(c.id AS CHAR)) cid
FROM books b
JOIN categories_of_books cb ON b.id = cb.book_id
JOIN categories c ON c.id = cb.category_id
WHERE b.id in (SELECT categories_of_books.book_id FROM categories_of_books join categories on categories_of_books.category_id = categories.id WHERE categories.id = 10)
GROUP BY b.id

Do you know other better variants?

share|improve this question
    
Please add context to the title of your question. "Is it possible?" means nothing. –  Armbrat Aug 24 '10 at 21:10
    
Ok, I added context. –  Dmitry Krasun Aug 24 '10 at 21:12
    
I think you might be trying to do too much in a single query. Focus your efforts on writing a query that just SELECTs all categories WHERE book_id = 10. –  Robert Harvey Aug 24 '10 at 21:20
    
no, query must return books and categories of each book and when category equals 10 or other –  Dmitry Krasun Aug 24 '10 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you're asking for, which is basically (if I've interpreted your requirements correctly):

  • For all the records in the books table, return one row
  • If a book has more than one category assigned, for the column categories to contain "category_1, category_2, category3", i.e. the concatenation of all category names
  • Only if one of the categories is categories.id = 10

What you need to do is start by selecting all books that are in the category with id = 10:

SELECT cb.book_id 
FROM   categories_of_books cb
WHERE  cb.category_id = 10

Now you want all books where they're in that subset:

SELECT b.*
FROM   books b
WHERE  b.id IN
(
    SELECT cb.book_id 
    FROM   categories_of_books cb
    WHERE  cb.category_id = 10
)

Now you can transform it back into your complicated grouping query:

SELECT b.*, 
       CONCAT(GROUP_CONCAT(c.name)) categories, 
       CONCAT(GROUP_CONCAT(c.id)) cids
FROM   books b
JOIN   categories_of_books cb 
       ON b.id = cb.book_id
JOIN   categories c 
       ON c.id = cb.category_id
WHERE  b.id IN
(
    SELECT cb.book_id 
    FROM   categories_of_books cb
    WHERE  cb.category_id = 10
)
GROUP BY b.id

There's really no tidier/simpler way that I can think of to achieve this. As an aside, it's worth taking the time to lay your code out using whitespace as I've done above as it's generally considered easier to read that way, anyone who has to maintain your code in the future will probaly thank you for it =)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but what the difference between my second query(edit1) and your last query? Can it be more optimal? –  Dmitry Krasun Aug 24 '10 at 21:31
    
@DimaKrasun, I've just seen your edit and there's no real way to make the query any different to be honest, although it's worth pointing out that I don't worry about joining categories_of_books to categories in my sub-query, as it's not actually necessary, which may make it slightly more optimal =) –  Rob Aug 24 '10 at 21:33
    
ok, one second, i`ll try your query –  Dmitry Krasun Aug 24 '10 at 21:34
    
thanks, it works fine –  Dmitry Krasun Aug 24 '10 at 21:35

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