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I'm doing Zed Shaw's fantastic Learn Python The Hard Way, but an extra question has me stumped: Line 9--10 could be written in one line, how? I've tried some different thoughts, but to no avail. I could move on, but what would the fun in that be?

from sys import argv
from os.path import exists

script, from_file, to_file = argv

print "Copying from %s to %s" % (from_file, to_file)

# we could do these two on one line too, how?
input = open(from_file)
indata = input.read()

print "The input file is %d bytes long" % len(indata)

print "Does the output file exist? %r" % exists(to_file)
print "Ready, hit RETURN to continue, CTRL-C to abort."
raw_input()

output = open(to_file, 'w')
output.write(indata)

print "Alright, all done."

Zed also writes that he could do the whole script in one line. I'm not exactly sure what he means by that.

Feel free to help me however you want: by giving the answer or merely hinting---and perhaps including a collapsed or hidden answer to the question.

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For more difficult expressions, you should avoid stuffing as much as possible on one line. –  leoluk Aug 24 '10 at 21:58
    
If you don't have any indented blocks, you can just string every line together, terminated with a semicolon. Very bad form, but if you're hell-bent on it... –  Nick T Aug 24 '10 at 21:59
1  
Or if you genuinely want to be a pain-in-the-ass: effbot.org/pyfaq/… –  Nick T Aug 24 '10 at 22:05
    
Also see the discussion on author's website: learnpythonthehardway.org/book/ex17.html –  Steve Koch Nov 23 '12 at 23:36

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted
indata = open(from_file).read()
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This can also be done when writing. –  Kironide Aug 24 '10 at 21:46
11  
yeah - though this (as well as the two-line solution) will leave the file open longer than needed, so you should avoid this in real code (a better way to do it in one line is with open(from_file) as f: indata = f.read(), if you want to save lines just for the hell of it) –  delnan Aug 24 '10 at 21:48
    
This seems the closest to the Python been taught up until that exercise. I just don't see how anyone would be able to infer such a solution from a completely new background - I also know some Java, but would not have thought of something like that. Is there a special terminology for this specific measure? I can't figure out how someone would figure this out, but maybe the extra questions are just aimed at a higher level than I presumed. Regardless, thanks a bunch. I would probably not have figured it out without the explicit solution. The same applies to everyone else's help. –  Kiwi Aug 24 '10 at 22:31
    
@Kiwi You would notice that input is set once and used once immediately after and therefore you can remove the temporary variable by using the expression itself. –  alternative Oct 31 '10 at 13:19
2  
@delnan: I think the intent here is not to save lines for the "hell of it", but to get folks used to the idea of being able to chain function/method calls together like this. @Kiwi: invoking a method on an expression that returns an object is a pretty common pattern in Java too. Consider for example one (now deprecated) Java way to print the current date: "new Date().toGMTString()". –  Owen S. Feb 16 '11 at 5:46

shutil is the way to do one-liner file copies in Python:

shutil.copy(sys.argv[1], sys.argv[2])

Putting the import shutil, sys on the same line as this one (with a semicolon in-between, of course) would however be stylistically goofy;-).

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This doesn't seem to address the question, though? Usually programming tutorials focus on concepts, so answers using different concepts seem less valuable to the student. –  dash-tom-bang Aug 24 '10 at 22:15
    
"Less valuable" than what? ';'.join of all the non-comment lines?-) –  Alex Martelli Aug 25 '10 at 0:17

Well you can just do "algebraic substitution," right? ...assuming you don't care about the "UI"...

open(to_file, 'w').write(open(from_file).read())
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1  
remember to_file = argv[2], etc! –  PreludeAndFugue Aug 24 '10 at 22:22
    
Exercise left for the reader? :) –  dash-tom-bang Aug 24 '10 at 22:24
from sys import argv
open(argv[2], 'w').write(open(argv[1]).read())
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This is as close as I could get too. I suppose import statement could be on same line but I don't know how to do that yet / plus 2 lines seems good enough :) –  Steve Koch Nov 23 '12 at 23:33

I agree with the algebraic substitution mentioned by @dash-tom-bang. My functioning Exercise 17 extra credit has 5 lines. The operation is being conducted on one line.

open(to_file, 'w').write(open(from_file).read())

followed by a simple 'print' for verification feedback

print "File %s copied to %s" % (from_file, to_file)

I should have a 6th line that replaces the original ''output.close'' but I am confused about how to do this without the ''output'' variable? Ahh, since I now have no output variable there is nothing to close.

btw- It is a little spooky for me to see the same exact line typed here that I have worked out and entered myself in gedit. Great stuff, I am really enjoying the mental challenge and community support.

Edit:answered my own question

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try the following code:

import shutil, sys; shutil.copy(sys.argv[0], sys.argv[2])
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He answers this below in the section "Common Student Questions"

No way you can make this one line!

That ; depends ; on ; how ; you ; define ; one ; line ; of ; code.

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output = open(to_file, 'w')
output.write(indata) 

can be written as

open(to_file, 'w').write(indata)
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  zishe Jun 19 at 3:23

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