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I have a pattern that repeats for several member functions that looks like this:

int myClass::abstract_one(int sig1)
{
  try {
    return _original->abstract_one(sig1);
  } catch (std::exception& err) {
    handleException(err);
  } catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

bool myClass::abstract_two(int sig2)
{
  try {
    return _original->abstract_two(sig2);
  } catch (std::exception& err) {
    handleException(err);
  } catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

[...]

int myClass::abstract_n(bool sig3a, short sig3b)
{
  try {
    return _original->abstract_n(sig3a, sig3b);
  } catch (std::exception& err) {
    handleException(err);
  } catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

Where abstract one through n are methods of a pure virtual abstract interface for which myClass and _original are concrete implementations.

I don't like that this pattern repeats in the code and would like to find a way to eliminate the repeating try / catch pattern and code as a single abstraction, but I can't think of a good way to do this in C++ without macros. I would think that there is a way with templates to do this better.

Please suggest a clean way to refactor this code to abstract out the repeated pattern.

share|improve this question
    
Macro's are probably your best bet, though it's a bit worrisome you try/throw/catch that often. –  GManNickG Aug 24 '10 at 23:05
2  
@GMan, you may need to do it for a library that has a C interface, or callbacks registered with a C library. –  Alex B Aug 24 '10 at 23:34
    
On another note, have you looked at any Lisp variant? Lisp shines at avoiding structural boilerplate like this. –  Alex B Aug 24 '10 at 23:35
    
removed variadic tag because your functions are not variadic. –  user195488 Aug 24 '10 at 23:56
    
@0A0D The best most concise solution would be variadic, hence the tag. –  WilliamKF Aug 25 '10 at 0:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I asked a very similar conceptual question, see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2466131/is-re-throwing-an-exception-legal-in-a-nested-try.

Basically, you can move the various exception handlers to a separate function by catching all exceptions, calling the handler and rethrowing the active exception.

void handle() {
 try {
  throw;
 } catch (std::exception& err) {
   handleException(err);
 } catch (MyException& err) {
   handleMyException(err);
 } catch (...) {
   handleException();
 }
}

try {
   return _original->abstract_two(sig2);
} catch (...) {
   handle();
}

It scales well with more different exception kinds to differenciate. You can pack the first try .. catch(...) into macros if you like to:

BEGIN_CATCH_HANDLER
return _original->abstract_two(sig2);
END_CATCH_HANDLER
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I like this idea. –  James McNellis Aug 25 '10 at 13:45
    
I should add that, after asking this once on SO, I've used it several times and I always found it quite elegant. So I'm wondering whether this pattern has a name? –  Alexander Gessler Aug 25 '10 at 14:30
3  
I've heard it called the "exception dispatcher idiom". –  GManNickG Aug 27 '10 at 3:43
    
Thanks! :-----) –  Alexander Gessler Aug 27 '10 at 11:27
    
Yeah, GMan's right - here's an example of a place that calls it that: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.15 –  SCFrench Aug 27 '10 at 14:02

One option, if there are a limited number of function arities, would be to use a function template:

template <typename ReturnT, typename ClassT>
ReturnT call_and_handle(ClassT* obj, ReturnT(ClassT::*func)()) 
{
    try {
        return (obj->*func)();
    }
    catch (const std::exception& ex) {
        handleException(ex);
    }
    catch (...) {
        handleException();
    }
    return ReturnT();
}

This assumes that handleException is some non-member function, but it is easy to modify it if it is a member function. You need to decide what call_and_handle returns if an exception is handled; I have it returning an initialized ReturnT as a placeholder.

This reduces your member functions to:

int myClass::abstract_one()
{
    return call_and_handle(_original, &myClass::abstract_one);
}

You would need a separate function template for calling functions that have one parameter, two parameters, etc.

If you have functions that have an unwieldy number of parameters and you were really desperate, you could use a macro (I wouldn't really recommend this, though):

#define CALL_AND_HANDLE(expr)           \
    try {                               \
        return (expr);                  \
    }                                   \
    catch (const std::exception& ex) {  \
        handleException(ex);            \
    }                                   \
    catch (...) {                       \
        handleException();              \
    }

Which can be used as:

int myClass::abstract_one()
{
    CALL_AND_HANDLE(_original->myClass::abstract_one());
}

As an aside, if you catch (...) and do not rethrow the caught exception, you should in most cases terminate the program.

share|improve this answer
    
@James McNellis, yes the exception is being rethrown inside handleException(). –  WilliamKF Aug 24 '10 at 23:13
    
@WilliamKF: In that case, I'd just comment the return ReturnT() line with a "this line is unreachable" comment or something along those lines. –  James McNellis Aug 24 '10 at 23:16
    
@James McNellis so the compiler will give warning or error in such case? In the forthcoming C++0x will there be a way to avoid the return statement to make the compiler happy? –  WilliamKF Aug 24 '10 at 23:18
    
@James McNellis will the ReturnT() work if ReturnT is void? –  WilliamKF Aug 24 '10 at 23:19
    
@WilliamKF: Yes, ReturnT() will work for any type that is default constructible and for void. I'd only include the return at the end to silence warnings about some paths not having a return and because it gives you a good place to document that the exception handler functions will not return. –  James McNellis Aug 24 '10 at 23:21

My answer is conceptually similar to James McNellis', except that I use boost::bind to do the heavy lifting:

using boost::bind;

class myClass
{
public:
  myClass(origClass * orig) : orig_(orig) {}

  int f1(bool b) { return wrapper(bind(&origClass::f1, orig_, b)); }
  bool f2(int i) { return wrapper(bind(&origClass::f2, orig_, i)); }
  void f3(int i) { return wrapper(bind(&origClass::f3, orig_, i)); }
private:
  origClass * orig_;

  template <typename T> 
  typename T::result_type wrapper(T func)
  {
    try {
      return func();
    } 
    catch (std::exception const &e) {
      handleError(e);
    }
    catch (...) {
      handleError();
    }
  }
};

Note that I wouldn't use a boost::function here as it can interfere with inlining.

share|improve this answer

I don't have an answer except to suggest that you might be better off avoiding exception handling altogether and relying instead on Smart Pointers and Boost Scope Exit to do all your resource clean up. That way you won't have to catch exceptions unless you can do something about them, which is rarely the case. Then you can do all exception handling in one centralized place higher up the call chain for error reporting and such.

share|improve this answer
1  
in this case the exceptions being thrown are in a 3rd party library that provides a concrete implementation of the abstract interface and thus cannot be avoided. –  WilliamKF Aug 24 '10 at 23:08

Use boost::function and boost::bind. Works with any function signature so long as the return type matches;

#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>

using boost::function;
using boost::bind;

template<typename T>
T exception_wrapper(boost::function<T()> func)
{
  try {
    return func();
  } catch (std::exception& err) {
    handleException(err);
  } catch (...) {
    handleException();
  }
}

// ways to call
int result = exception_wrapper<int>(bind(libraryFunc, firstParam));
// or a member function
LibraryClass* object;
result = exception_wrapper<int>(bind(&LibraryClass::Function, object, firstParam));

// So your wrapping class:
class YourWrapper : public SomeInterface
{
public:
    int abstract_one(int sig1)
    {
        return exception_wrapper<int>(bind(&LibraryClass::concrete_one, m_pObject, sig1));
    }

    bool abstract_two(int sig1, int sig2)
    {
        return exception_wrapper<bool>(bind(&LibraryClass::concrete_two, m_pObject, sig1, sig2));
    }

    // ...

private:
   LibraryClass* m_pObject;
};
share|improve this answer
    
You're missing a return in exception_wrapper in the case that func() throws. –  uckelman Oct 21 '11 at 15:32

As a variant on Alexander Gessler's solution you can omit some of the braces that make this implementation a little long. It does exactly the same thing, just with a little less { } verbage.

void handle() try 
{ 
  throw;
}
  catch (std::exception& err) 
{
  handleException(err);
}
  catch (MyException& err)
{
  handleMyException(err);
}
  catch (...)
{
  handleException();
}



int myClass::abstract_one(int sig1) try 
{
  return _original->abstract_one(sig1);
}
  catch (...)
{
  handle();
  return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I've never seen making try the outer most expression of a function body, this is standard syntax? –  WilliamKF Aug 25 '10 at 14:42
1  
@WilliamKF Its called a "function try block" and is covered lightly in the 15.1.4 section of my copy of the draft standard [N1905=05-0165] from 2005. –  Michael Anderson Aug 26 '10 at 2:54
    
So what does the compiler do if you exit the catch block without throwing, what is the return value? –  WilliamKF Aug 26 '10 at 4:12
    
From memory the catch block can return something (and in my example should - so I've updated it), or the handle() must rethrow something . –  Michael Anderson Aug 27 '10 at 2:49

My answer is: do nothing at all. The first code example as shown is fine. So what is there's repetition? It is plain and clear, and does what it looks like it does. It can be understood with no extra mental burdens past the code seen and general knowledge of C++.

Consider your motive for asking this question.

Where I'm coming from is past projects where code had to be examined by others - not PhD Comp Sci experts, but federal inspectors, mechanical engineers, self-taught programmers, scientists, etc. Smart people, all of them (or most of them), but only an off-the-deep-end chrome dome PhD, or a younger programmer out to impress everyone with their hi IQ, would appreciate the clever "solutions" to this question. For the places I've been, nothing beats plain clear code that does what it says, with no mental burden of having to keep in mind the meaning of dozens of classes, macros, etc. and recognizing "design pattern" understood properly only be experienced software engineers.

Increasingly, I find C++ (and Java and C#) code becoming more sophisticated in a coding sense, but needing to be understood by non-experts in C++.

Of course YMMV, depending on the intended audience and source of potential future maintenence programmers. Sometimes clever coding is necessary to achieve certain goals. Is your case an example?

share|improve this answer
    
I feel the accepted solution is a reasonable balance between obfuscation and reduced code to maintain and understand. –  WilliamKF Aug 29 '10 at 21:36
    
So what if there's repetition? So complying with my client's coding standards, I end up with dozens of instances of similar code that is a pain to maintain and a bigger pain to attempt to read! That's what... –  sage Jun 15 '13 at 23:21

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