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The following code works fine until I upgrade to .NET 4 (x64)

namespace CrashME
{
    class Program
    {
        private static volatile bool testCrash = false;
        private static void Crash()
        {
            try
            {
            }
            finally
            {
                HttpRuntime.Cache.Insert("xxx", testCrash);
            }

        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Crash();
            // Works on .NET 3.5 , crash on .NET 4
        }
    }
}

Did I just uncover a runtime bug, or is there some issue with my usage?

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1  
+1 for __StackOverflow__Exception :) –  George Chakhidze Dec 30 '10 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This would appear to be a bug in the CLR - you should report it to Microsoft.

Note that the StackOverflowException occurs as the CLR attempts to execute the Crash, not during the execution of the Crash method - the program in fact never enters the method. This would appear to indicate that this is some low-level failure in the CLR. (Also note that the thrown exception also has no stack trace).

This exception is incredibly specific to this situation - changing any one of a number of things fixes this, for example the following code works fine:

private static void Crash()
{
    bool testCrash2 = testCrash;
    try { }
    finally
    {
        HttpRuntime.Cache.Insert("xxx", testCrash2);
    }
}

I would recommend that you report this to Microsoft, but attempt to work around the issue by tweaking your code in the meantime.

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Ok, the CLR team have been notified so we should see a fix for this at some point –  Sam Saffron Aug 26 '10 at 3:45

I can reproduce it on an x86 machine. The following code also fails:

        try
        {
        }
        finally
        {
            var foo = new List<object>();
            foo.Add(testCrash);
        }

However, the following code succeeds:

        try
        {
        }
        finally
        {
            var foo = new List<bool>();
            foo.Add(testCrash);
        }

I thought it might have something to do with the boxing of volatile fields within the finally block, but then I tried the following (which also fails):

        try
        {
        }
        finally
        {
            bool[] foo = new bool[1];
            foo[0] = testCrash;
        }

Very interesting problem...

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