Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to have my scripts keep track of thier last date of revision internally as a comment. Is this possible? It seems to me that it would need to grab the date and then open its script file for an append, write the data and save the file.

Thanks Everone, great answsers one and all. Based on the code snippet left by GreenMatt I threw this together...

#!/usr/bin/perl -w 

my ($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year,$wday,$yday,$isdst) = localtime time;
$year += 1900;
$mon +=1;

open SELF, ">> letterhome.pl" or die "Unable to open self"; 
#print SELF "# ran/modified at " . join(' ', localtime(time)) . "\n"; 
print SELF "# ran/modified at $hour:$min:$sec on $mon/$mday/$year.\n"; 
close(SELF); 

# ran/modified at 31 48 23 24 7 110 2 235 1  
# unformated result of using localtime(time)  

#Results using formated time/date 
# ran/modified at 0:1:43 on 8/25/2010.
# ran/modified at 0:2:40 on 8/25/2010.
# ran/modified at 0:4:35 on 8/25/2010.
share|improve this question
2  
Sounds like you already know how to do it. If it is a perl script on a unix/linux box then permissions should not be an issue, if it is on a windows box it might not let you as the file is in use. –  John Aug 25 '10 at 3:11
1  
Filesystems usually store the last modification time stored as metadata. If what the OS does is not exactly what you want, you can modify the metadata, no need to store it inside a comment in the sourcecode. That would work under both Windows and Linux. –  Vinko Vrsalovic Aug 25 '10 at 3:15
1  
@John:dude, if you put that exact comment as an answer, I would vote it up, and it would probably be accepted. –  Matt Briggs Aug 25 '10 at 3:15
2  
I'm more curious about why you would want to do this? Emacs and other editors have special variables that you use. If you're trying to use some sort of version control, I suggest you look at SVN, GIT, or Mercurial. –  vol7ron Aug 25 '10 at 3:24
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is possible, but that doesn't make it a good idea. For one thing, it wouldn't update the date until you ran it.

If you're using a good editor, it may have a way to insert a timestamp automatically when you save the file. For example, I set up Emacs to do that in HTML files using write-contents-hooks. (It would need some modification to work with Perl code, but cjm-html-timestamp in cjm-misc.el would give you a starting point.)

share|improve this answer
    
You are absolutely correct! I should have realized that before I ever created the post, that will teach me to post while running a low grade fever. I suppose it may be useful in certain circumstances to track the last date of execution within the script itself. Although a good log would seem to be the prefered method. Thanks, I appreaciate the quickness of your answer! –  jwhalen72 Aug 25 '10 at 3:26
    
jwhalen72 might not read comments, but cjm does :) –  vol7ron Aug 25 '10 at 3:59
    
Lol... I read the comments, grocking is another thing entirely ;) btw... your comment sounds like a "Chicks on Speed" reference... –  jwhalen72 Aug 25 '10 at 4:11
add comment

You can get your version control system to do this automatically.

But if you are using version control then this step is really not nesaccery in the first place.

share|improve this answer
2  
Well, that depends on your VC. Git doesn't do keyword expansion. (Well, it can, but it's not trivial to set up and not recommended.) –  cjm Aug 25 '10 at 3:37
add comment

By request adding my comment as an answer.

Sounds like you already know how to do it. If it is a perl script on a unix/linux box then permissions should not be an issue, if it is on a windows box it might not let you as the file is in use.

share|improve this answer
add comment
#! /usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use autodie;

{
  open my $self, '>>', $0;
  my $time = localtime;
  print {$self} "# ran on $time\n";
}

__END__
# ran on Wed Aug 25 16:41:05 2010
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! it's interesting how the var when printed yields the nice format "Wed Aug 25 16:41:05 2010" while when invoked directly as in "print localtime;" it yields "21411925711032361" –  jwhalen72 Aug 25 '10 at 23:44
    
localtime is not a variable, it is a subroutine. print scalar localtime would yield the same result. –  Brad Gilbert Aug 29 '10 at 18:03
add comment

The following worked on a FreeBSD system. It appends to the end, which sounds acceptable to you, but doesn't conform to the "normal" way of documenting changes within a file - at least for me, as I've almost always seen it done at the beginning. You'll probably want to change the way the date/time is displayed.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
open SELF, ">> selfModify.pl" or die "Unable to open self";
print SELF "# ran/modified at " . join(' ', localtime()) . "\n";
close(SELF);

Whether this is wise or not I'll leave for you to decide.

share|improve this answer
    
I added a bit to put the timestamp in a more readable format... not sure if this has to do with running strawberry Perl on my windows PC or if it is simply how the "localtime(time) function works... –  jwhalen72 Aug 25 '10 at 4:06
    
localtime(time) is pointless localtime() calls time for you. –  Brad Gilbert Aug 25 '10 at 21:49
    
@Brad Gilbert: It seems you're right. I modified the answer. –  GreenMatt Sep 16 '10 at 17:10
add comment

Sounds like you already know how to do it. If it is a perl script on a unix/linux box then permissions should not be an issue, if it is on a windows box it might not let you as the file is in use

-- John

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.