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Can you briefly list the differences between <%= %>, <%# %> and <%$ %> by giving a simple example?

Maybe one that requires only one of those expressions to be used?

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Did you read the documentation ? IIRC it's quite explicit on this subject –  Thomas Levesque Aug 25 '10 at 12:26
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You missed <%: %> –  SLaks Aug 25 '10 at 12:26
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I wish VS gave a little more direction via intellisense or tooltips on what these mean. –  Greg Aug 25 '10 at 13:10
    
Related (duplicate?): When should I use # and = in ASP.NET controls?. –  Peter Mortensen Mar 30 '11 at 9:52
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1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

<% %>

<% this.CallMethod() %> - Basic code block that executes the statements inside.


<%= %>

<%= "text" %> - Embedded code syntax. Same as writing <% Response.Write("text") %>.


<%: %>

<%: "text" %> - Same as above except it's a shorthand for <%= Server.HtmlEncode("text") %>. This was introduced in ASP.NET 4 and is the default syntax used.


<%# %>

<%# Eval("ColumnName") %> - Used for databinding.


<%$ %>

<%$ AppSettings: settingName %> - The expression syntax has a prefix such as AppSettings, ConnectionStrings, or Resources and then a : followed by the actual expression. It can be used as a shorthand to access resources inline. You can even create your own syntax used here (Thanks @Thomas Levesque). Also see MSDN for more info.


<%@ %>

<%@ Page language="C#" %> - The directive syntax useful for page/control settings.


<%-- --%>

<%-- This is a comment --%> - Server-side comment syntax. This differs from the HTML <!-- a comment --> syntax in that it won't be rendered in the output.

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It's interesting to note that you can create your own expression syntax extensions for use with <%$ %>, although it isn't very well documented –  Thomas Levesque Aug 25 '10 at 12:56
    
@Thomas - I found a great article and MSDN info about the custom expressions (updated my post). You've opened a whole new world! –  TheCloudlessSky Aug 25 '10 at 13:14
    
Tank you very much guys! –  pencilCake Aug 30 '10 at 7:43
    
we have used this weblogs.asp.net/infinitiesloop/archive/2006/08/09/… expression builder for years, allows you to put any code you like in :) –  Richard Friend Mar 30 '11 at 9:54
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