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I'd like to write an extension method to the String class so that if the input string to is longer than the provided length N, only the first N characters are to be displayed.

Here's how it looks like:

public static string TruncateLongString(this string str, int maxLength)
{
    if (str.Length <= maxLength)
        return str;
    else
        //return the first maxLength characters                
}

What String.*() method can I use to get only the first N characters of str?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 140 down vote accepted
public static string TruncateLongString(this string str, int maxLength)
{
    return str.Substring(0, Math.Min(str.Length, maxLength));
}
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4  
Is the Math.Min needed? I thought Substring knew that if the second parameter was greater than the length, it just plugged in the length? –  Martin Aug 25 '10 at 14:27
6  
I believe it is: System.String.InternalSubStringWithChecks would throw ArgumentOutOfRange. –  Paul Ruane Aug 25 '10 at 14:29
1  
@Martin: not that I can see, startIndex > (this.Length - length) throws an ArgumentOutOfRangeException. –  user7116 Aug 25 '10 at 14:31
2  
I was going to suggest checking if Math.Min(str.Length, maxLength) == str.Length in case you end up creating an unnecessary string to return "the first str.Length characters of str", but Substring does that check for you and just does return this if you've asked for the whole string. –  stevemegson Aug 25 '10 at 14:37
1  
+1 for using Math.Min –  kalyan Feb 25 '14 at 22:14
string truncatedToNLength = new string(s.Take(n).ToArray());  

This solution has a tiny bonus in that if n is greater than s.Length, it still does the right thing.

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you can use linq str.Take(n) or string.SubString str.Substring(0, n)

mind you the linq version will return a char[] whereas Substring returns a string, so you'd have to convert the char[] to string if you wanna use linq: new string(s.Take(n).ToArray())

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substring(int startpos, int lenght);
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public static string TruncateLongString(this string str, int maxLength)
{
    return str.Length <= maxLength ? str : str.Remove(maxLength);
}
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Also, note that you could also make the extension method null-safe by changing the condition to str == null || str.Length <= maxLength –  kbrimington Aug 25 '10 at 14:29
3  
For anyone wondering whether Remove or Substring is better, there's no difference. Remove(maxLength) just calls Substring(0,maxLength) after a bit of bounds checking. Which you prefer depends on whether you think of the truncation as "take the first maxLength characters" or "throw away everything after maxLength characters". Of course, it's really both so it's up to you. –  stevemegson Aug 25 '10 at 14:45

Simply:

public static String Truncate(String input,int maxLength)
{
   if(input.Length > maxLength)
      return input.Substring(0,maxLength);
   return input;
}
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if we are talking about validations also why we have not checked for null string entries. Any specific reasons?

I think below way help since IsNullOrEmpty is a system defined method and ternary operators have cyclomatic complexity = 1 while if() {} else {} has value 2.

public static string Truncate(string input, int truncLength) {

        return (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(input) && input.Length >= truncLength)
                   ? input.Substring(0, truncLength)
                   : input;

    }
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string.Substring(0,n); // 0 - start index and n - number of characters

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1  
Unlike the accepted answer, this can result in index out of bounds errors. –  Servy Sep 30 '13 at 17:50

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