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Enums are generally used to define the state of a particular property of a class, say in an object model of some sort. For some of these properties, the state 'this property is not set' is valid.

In these situations, should I use a zero None enum value, or make the property type nullable?

public MyEnum Property { get; set; }

public enum MyEnum {
    None = 0,
    Value1,
    Value2
}

or

public MyEnum? Property { get; set; }

public enum MyEnum {
    Value1,
    Value2
}
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use MyEnum.None - it is much more expressive, or even MyEnum.Invalid to convey meaning.

You can also set it to other values than 0 - since it is based on int, you can set it to be -1 and the first valid value to 1:

public enum MyEnum {
    InvalidValue = -1,
    Value1 = 1,
    Value2
}

In your code you can easily check for this value being passed in and throw a descriptive exception.

A nullable enum type is not expected and less expressive. It requires users of you code to be aware of this and check for nulls.

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It's hard to answer this conclusively, a lot of factors in your app will influence this. I tend to just define the enum value to 0, but not specify a zero value in the enum.

enum Foo 
{
   A = 1,
   B = 2
}

...

Foo myFoo = (Foo)0;

This gives the benefit of a sentinel value, without polluting the enum.

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I would use the "None" value instead of a nullable enum. If nothing else, to me if(Property == MyEnum.None) is a lot more readable than if(Property == null).

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Another option is to set the first value to 1, since it will be initally 0.

public enum MyEnum {
    Value1 = 1,
    Value2
}

I think both of your situations are acceptable! It will depend upon your situation. When working with a user interface your first example with the 'None' value will probbaly be easier to use. However, the Nullable gives more information about how the variable should be used.

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