Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a custom made collection that has many modes of objects generations inside of it.
It can generate everything, one object at a time or N objects at a time.
I would like to have the option to switch between implementations of generation on runtime, and even maybe create new ones.
I am looking for something with this kind of syntax:

foreach(var obj in myCollection.EnumerateAs(new LazyEnumerator())
{
   // ...
}

My problems are:
I don't know what does EnumerateAs() return? I am assuming that it's IEnumerator but will it still be the enumerator of my list?
Does LazyEnumerator inherit from IEnumerator?
How is it aware of myCollection?

share|improve this question
    
Why the downvote? –  the_drow Aug 27 '10 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The return value of your EnumerateAs() should be IEnumerable<T>, where T is the type of object contained in your collection. I recommend reading more about yield return, as this may help you to understand how enumeration works. There is no default class for providing an enumeration 'strategy', but you can easily implement something like this by using yield return on the underlying collection in various ways.

It's not clear from your question exactly how the enumeration strategies would interact with your collection class. It looks like you might be after something like:

public interface IEnumerationStrategy<TCollection, T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> Enumerate(TCollection source);
}

public class Quark {}

public class MyCollection
{
    public IEnumerable<Quark> EnumerateAs(IEnumerationStrategy<MyCollection, Quark> strategy)
    {
        return strategy.Enumerate(this);
    }

    //Various special methods needed to implement stategies go here
}

public class SpecialStrategy : IEnumerationStrategy<MyCollection, Quark>
{
    public IEnumerable<Quark> Enumerate(MyCollection source)
    {
        //Use special methods to do custom enumeration via yield return that depends on specifics of MyCollection
    }
}

Note that you might also replace the strategy class with a simple strategy Func<MyCollection, IEnumerable<T>>, but the above matches your desired syntax most closely.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you show me a simple code example? How would EnumerateAs look like? Shouldn't the yield be in the LazyEnumerator itself? That means that I have to pass the list to the LazyEnumerator, right? –  the_drow Aug 25 '10 at 15:27
    
So the enumeration strategy doesn't inherit from IEnumerator<T>? Thanks for the tip. I will create two overloads so it will also accept delegates :) –  the_drow Aug 25 '10 at 15:35
    
This achieves the goal of your question, but my sense is that this may be more complex than you need. The strategies are tightly coupled to your custom MyCollection class, so there's little extensibility benefit and you might as well make the different enumerations methods of your collection. This would mainly be beneficial if you had a common interface for several special collections (it sounds like they're really more Generators than Collections) and wanted a way to share strategies across them via a standard interface. –  Dan Bryant Aug 25 '10 at 15:52
    
I do have a common interface for all of my collections. If I was talking about one collection I wouldn't need the strategies as you said. I would have just made them member functions. However I need that extensibility since I have many collections that share the same interface and some have unique enumeration/generation combos. –  the_drow Aug 25 '10 at 16:00
    
@the_drow, In that case, you might consider making the custom enumeration strategies extension methods of your common collection interface. This is more in line with the way LINQ works and will thus be more familiar to consumers of your code. –  Dan Bryant Aug 25 '10 at 17:10

I would suggest that you start by creating functions GetEnumeratorInFirstStyle, GetEnumeratorInSecondStyle, etc. (use names suitable to your application, of course), and then create new structures something like (example in vb syntax, but should be easily convertible to C#):

Class enumTest
    Function GetEnumeratorInFirstStyle() As IEnumerator(Of Integer)
        Return Enumerable.Empty(Of Integer)() ' Real code would do something better
    End Function
    Private Structure FirstStyleEnumerable
        Implements IEnumerable(Of Integer)

        Private myEnumTest As enumTest

        Public Function GetEnumerator() As System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator(Of Integer) Implements System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable(Of Integer).GetEnumerator
            Return myEnumTest.GetEnumeratorInFirstStyle
        End Function

        Public Function GetEnumerator1() As System.Collections.IEnumerator Implements System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator
            Return myEnumTest.GetEnumeratorInFirstStyle
        End Function

        Sub New(ByVal newEnumTest As enumTest)
            myEnumTest = newEnumTest
        End Sub
    End Structure
    Public ReadOnly Property AsFirstStyleEnumerable As IEnumerable(Of Integer)
        Get
            Return New FirstStyleEnumerable(Me)
        End Get
    End Property
End Class

Note that a structure is used rather than a class, since using a class would require creating a new heap object and add an extra level of indirection to its access; the real purpose of the structure is to allow it to implement a "different" IEnumerable<T> from the encapsulated object. BTW, it would be possible to use generics with marker classes to avoid having to manually define a new FirstStyleEnumerator structure for each variation on enumeration. I'm not sure whether that would be cleaner or more confusing, though.

Interface IQualifiedEnumerable(Of T, U)
    Function GetEnumerator() As IEnumerable(Of U)
End Interface

Structure QualifiedEnumerableWrapper(Of T, U)
    Implements IEnumerable(Of U)
    Private myEnumerable As IQualifiedEnumerable(Of T, U)

    Public Function GetEnumerator() As System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator(Of U) Implements System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable(Of U).GetEnumerator
        Return myEnumerable.GetEnumerator
    End Function

    Public Function GetEnumerator1() As System.Collections.IEnumerator Implements System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator
        Return myEnumerable.GetEnumerator
    End Function

    Sub New(ByVal newEnumerable As IQualifiedEnumerable(Of T, U))
        myEnumerable = newEnumerable
    End Sub
End Structure

Class EnumTest2
    Implements IQualifiedEnumerable(Of FirstEnumerationStyle, Integer)
    Implements IQualifiedEnumerable(Of SecondEnumerationStyle, Integer)

    Private Class FirstEnumerationStyle     ' Marker classes for generics
    End Class
    Private Class SecondEnumerationStyle
    End Class

    Private Function GetFirstStyleEnumerator() As System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable(Of Integer) Implements IQualifiedEnumerable(Of FirstEnumerationStyle, Integer).GetEnumerator
        Return Enumerable.Empty(Of Integer)()
    End Function

    Private Function GetSecondStyleEnumerator() As System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable(Of Integer) Implements IQualifiedEnumerable(Of SecondEnumerationStyle, Integer).GetEnumerator
        Return Enumerable.Empty(Of Integer)()
    End Function

    Public ReadOnly Property AsFirstStyleEnumerable As IEnumerable(Of Integer)
        Get
            Return New QualifiedEnumerableWrapper(Of FirstEnumerationStyle, Integer)
        End Get
    End Property

    Public ReadOnly Property AsSecondStyleEnumerable As IEnumerable(Of Integer)
        Get
            Return New QualifiedEnumerableWrapper(Of SecondEnumerationStyle, Integer)
        End Get
    End Property
End Class

Here, the definitions of the interface and the structure are entirely general-purpose; adding each additional method of enumeration to a class would require adding a function to return its enumerator, and a property to return a QualifiedEnumerableWrapper of the appropriate type.

share|improve this answer
public class AltEnumerator : System.Collections.IEnumerable
{

    private System.Collections.IEnumerator _base;

    public AltEnumerator(System.Collections.IEnumerator _pbase)
    {
        _base = _pbase;
    }


    #region IEnumerable Members

    public System.Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _base ;
    }

    #endregion
}

in your class you can:

    public AltEnumerator Iterate(IterDIrection How )
    {
        switch (How)
        {
            case TwoDimArray<T>.IterDIrection.RghtLeftTopBottom:
                return new AltEnumerator(GetRightLeft());
        }
        return new AltEnumerator(GetEnumerator());
    }

    private System.Collections.IEnumerator GetRightLeft()
    {
        for (int cndx = PutSlotArray.GetLength(1) - 1; cndx >= 0; cndx--)
            for (int rndx = 0; rndx < PutSlotArray.GetLength(0); rndx++)
                if (PutSlotArray[rndx, cndx] != null)
                    yield return PutSlotArray[rndx, cndx];
    }

    #region IEnumerable Members

    public System.Collections.IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach (T ps in PutSlotArray)
            if (ps != null)
                yield return ps;
    }

    #endregion

very flexable.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please explain your code and show an example? –  quantum Oct 21 '12 at 3:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.