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I founded a way to get inherited members via class.getDeclaredFields(); and acces to private members via class.getFields() But i'm looking for private inherited fields. How can i achieve this?

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17  
"private inherited fields" does not exist. If a field is private, it is not inherited, and remains only to the scope of the parent class. To access parent private fields, you have to access parent class first (cf. aioobe's response) –  Benoit Courtine Aug 25 '10 at 15:22
3  
that said, protected fields are inherited, but you have to do the same to get them by reflection. –  Bozho Aug 25 '10 at 16:14
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7 Answers

This should demonstrate how to solve it:

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

class Super {
    private int i = 5;
}

public class B extends Super {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        B b = new B();
        Field[] fs = b.getClass().getSuperclass().getDeclaredFields();
        fs[0].setAccessible(true);
        System.out.println(fs[0].get(b));
    }
}

Output:

5
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getDeclaredFields() for the one I was looking for. thx –  shkschneider Dec 8 '12 at 23:12
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The best approach here is using the Visitor Pattern do find all fields in the class and all super classes and execute a callback action on them.


Implementation

Spring has a nice Utility class ReflectionUtils that does just that: it defines a method to loop over all fields of all super classes with a callback: ReflectionUtils.doWithFields()

Documentation:

Invoke the given callback on all fields in the target class, going up the class hierarchy to get all declared fields.

Parameters:
- clazz - the target class to analyze
- fc - the callback to invoke for each field
- ff - the filter that determines the fields to apply the callback to

Sample code:

ReflectionUtils.doWithFields(RoleUnresolvedList.class,
    new FieldCallback(){

        @Override
        public void doWith(final Field field) throws IllegalArgumentException,
            IllegalAccessException{

            System.out.println("Found field " + field + " in type "
                + field.getDeclaringClass());

        }
    },
    new FieldFilter(){

        @Override
        public boolean matches(final Field field){
            final int modifiers = field.getModifiers();
            // no static fields please
            return !Modifier.isStatic(modifiers);
        }
    });

Output:

Found field private transient boolean javax.management.relation.RoleUnresolvedList.typeSafe in type class javax.management.relation.RoleUnresolvedList
Found field private transient boolean javax.management.relation.RoleUnresolvedList.tainted in type class javax.management.relation.RoleUnresolvedList
Found field private transient java.lang.Object[] java.util.ArrayList.elementData in type class java.util.ArrayList
Found field private int java.util.ArrayList.size in type class java.util.ArrayList
Found field protected transient int java.util.AbstractList.modCount in type class java.util.AbstractList

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2  
that is not a "visitor pattern", but it is still a very nice tool if you have the Spring virus in your code. thanks for sharing it :) –  jose.diego Aug 28 '13 at 0:27
    
@jose.diego I'm pretty sure you could argue about that. It visits a class hierarchy rather than an object tree, but the principle remains the same –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 28 '13 at 14:43
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This'll do it:

private List<Field> getInheritedPrivateFields(Class<?> type) {
    List<Field> result = new ArrayList<Field>();

    Class<?> i = type;
    while (i != null && i != Object.class) {
        result.addAll(i.getDeclaredFields());
        i = i.getSuperclass();
    }

    return result;
}

If you use a code coverage tool like EclEmma, you have to watch out: they add a hidden field to each of your classes. In the case of EclEmma, these fields are marked synthetic, and you can filter them out like this:

private List<Field> getInheritedPrivateFields(Class<?> type) {
    List<Field> result = new ArrayList<Field>();

    Class<?> i = type;
    while (i != null && i != Object.class) {
        for (Field field : i.getDeclaredFields()) {
            if (!field.isSynthetic()) {
                result.add(field);
            }
        }
        i = i.getSuperclass();
    }

    return result;
}
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Thanks for your remark about synthetic fields, EMMA does the same. –  Anatoliy May 22 '12 at 9:04
    
this gets declared and inherited fields of the argument class so should be named getDeclaredAndInheritedPrivateFields. perfect though thanks! –  Peter Hawkins Jan 7 '13 at 19:58
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

In fact i use a complex type hierachy so you solution is not complete. I need to make a recursive call to get all the private inherited fields. Here is my solution

 /**
 * Return the set of fields declared at all level of class hierachy
 */
public Vector<Field> getAllFields(Class clazz) {
    return getAllFieldsRec(clazz, new Vector<Field>());
}

private Vector<Field> getAllFieldsRec(Class clazz, Vector<Field> vector) {
    Class superClazz = clazz.getSuperclass();
    if(superClazz != null){
        getAllFieldsRec(superClazz, vector);
    }
    vector.addAll(toVector(clazz.getDeclaredFields()));
    return vector;
}
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However, his solution did get you on the right path, didn't it? –  aperkins Aug 25 '10 at 15:55
    
Vector is bad old code. Please use a current data structure from the collections framework (ArrayList is adequate in most cases) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 25 '10 at 15:58
    
@aperkins the answer of aioobe look like mine, but i found it and then i saw the answer. @seanizer Vector is not that old, and it'a a member of the collection API –  BenZen Aug 25 '10 at 17:53
    
"As of the Java 2 platform v1.2, this class has been retrofitted to implement List, so that it becomes a part of Java's collection framework." retrofitted in 1.2? if that's not old then what is? Source: download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Vector.html –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 25 '10 at 19:04
4  
Vector has a huge overhead because everything is synchronized. And where you need synchronization, there are better classes in java.util.concurrent. Vector, Hashtable and StringBuffer should in most cases be replaced by ArrayList, HashMap and StringBuilder –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 25 '10 at 19:09
show 1 more comment
private static Field getField(Class<?> clazz, String fieldName) {
    Class<?> tmpClass = clazz;
    do {
        for ( Field field : tmpClass.getDeclaredFields() ) {
            String candidateName = field.getName();
            if ( ! candidateName.equals(fieldName) ) {
                continue;
            }
            field.setAccessible(true);
            return field;
        }
        tmpClass = tmpClass.getSuperclass();
    } while ( clazz != null );
    throw new RuntimeException("Field '" + fieldName +
        "' not found on class " + clazz);
}
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public static Field getField(Class<?> clazz, String fieldName) {
    Class<?> tmpClass = clazz;
    do {
        try {
            Field f = tmpClass.getDeclaredField(fieldName);
            return f;
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            tmpClass = tmpClass.getSuperclass();
        }
    } while (tmpClass != null);

    throw new RuntimeException("Field '" + fieldName
            + "' not found on class " + clazz);
}

(based on this answer)

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+1, thank you very much! –  Bernicc May 27 '13 at 11:40
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I needed to add support for inherited fields for blueprints in Model Citizen. I derived this method that is a bit more concise for retrieving a Class' fields + inherited fields.

private List<Field> getAllFields(Class clazz) {
    List<Field> fields = new ArrayList<Field>();

    fields.addAll(Arrays.asList( clazz.getDeclaredFields() ));

    Class superClazz = clazz.getSuperclass();
    if(superClazz != null){
        fields.addAll( getAllFields(superClazz) );
    }

    return fields;
}
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