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Given the benefits of composable events as offered by the Reactive Extensions (Rx) framework, I'm wondering whether my classes should stop pushing .NET events, and instead expose Rx observables.

For instance, take the following class using standard .NET events:

public class Foo
{
   private int progress;
   public event EventHandler ProgressChanged;

   public int Progress
   {
      get { return this.progress; }
      set
      {
         if (this.progress != value)
         {
            this.progress = value;

            // Raise the event while checking for no subscribers and preventing unsubscription race condition.
            var progressChanged = this.ProgressChanged;
            if (progressChanged != null)
            {
                progressChanged(this, new EventArgs());
            }
         }
      }
   }
}

Lot of monotonous plumbing.

This class could instead use some sort of observable to replace this functionality:

public class Foo
{
   public Foo()
   {
       this.Progress = some new observable;
   }

   public IObservable<int> Progress { get; private set; }
}

Far less plumbing. Intention is no longer obscured by plumbing details. This seems beneficial.

My questions for you fine StackOverflow folks are:

  1. Would it good/worthwhile to replace standard .NET events with IObservable<T> values?
  2. If I were to use an observable, what kind would I use here? Obviously I need to push values to it (e.g. Progress.UpdateValue(...) or something).
share|improve this question
3  
If it's acceptable to the clients of your code to have a dependency on Rx, then it seems like a good idea to me. Some shops are hesitant to use software still in experimental development, though my experience with the MS DevLabs stuff has been that it's pretty stable (I've seen 'production' code in much worse shape.) –  Dan Bryant Aug 25 '10 at 17:04
2  
Actually, it wouldn't force them to use Rx. IObserver/IObservable are part of the standard .NET framework. Of course if you want all the sexy syntax sugar, extension methods, etc, you'll want the full RX framework. So you're right in that regard. Thanks for the comment. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 17:18
    
Damn, if only this question had obeyed the SRP - the first half is the interesting bit being ducked :D –  Ruben Bartelink Jul 3 at 14:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I don't recommend managing your own subscriber list when there are built in subjects that can do that for you. It also removes the need for carrying your own mutable copy of T.

Below is my (commentless) version of your solution:

public class Observable<T> : IObservable<T>, INotifyPropertyChanged 
{ 
    private readonly BehaviorSubject<T> values; 

    private PropertyChangedEventHandler propertyChanged; 

    public Observable() : this(default(T))
    {
    } 

    public Observable(T initalValue) 
    { 
        this.values = new BehaviorSubject<T>(initalValue);

        values.DistinctUntilChanged().Subscribe(FirePropertyChanged);
    }

    public T Value 
    { 
        get { return this.values.First(); } 
        set { values.OnNext(value); } 
    }

    private void FirePropertyChanged(T value)
    {
        var handler = this.propertyChanged;

        if (handler != null)
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Value"));
    }

    public override string ToString() 
    { 
        return value != null ? value.ToString() : "Observable<" + typeof(T).Name + "> with null value."; 
    } 

    public static implicit operator T(Observable<T> input) 
    { 
        return input.Value; 
    } 

    public IDisposable Subscribe(IObserver<T> observer) 
    { 
        return values.Subscribe(observer);
    } 

    event PropertyChangedEventHandler INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged 
    { 
        add { this.propertyChanged += value; } 
        remove { this.propertyChanged -= value; } 
    } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nifty! Thank you, Richard. –  Judah Himango Sep 13 '10 at 15:02
    
Updated your code to remove the line "this.value = x" inside the DistinctUntilChanged subscription, as there is no value field. –  Judah Himango Oct 3 '10 at 20:29

For #2, the most straightforward way is via a Subject:

Subject<int> _Progress;
IObservable<int> Progress {
    get { return _Progress; }
}

private void setProgress(int new_value) {
    _Progress.OnNext(new_value);
}

private void wereDoneWithWorking() {
    _Progress.OnCompleted();
}

private void somethingBadHappened(Exception ex) {
    _Progress.OnError(ex);
}

With this, now your "Progress" can not only notify when the progress has changed, but when the operation has completed, and whether it was successful. Keep in mind though, that once an IObservable has completed either via OnCompleted or OnError, it's "dead" - you can't post anything further to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I'm unfamiliar with Subject. I see it's what I need as far as being able to update it. Still, I don't like the foo.SetProgress(42) call. I'd rather do something like foo.Progress.Value = 42; Maybe a custom Observable is what I really need here. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 17:05
    
I guess my objection to using subject boils down to putting more work in the callee -- now I have to provide a separate setter method for each observable in my class. I'm definitely leaning towards a custom observer now. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 17:07
    
You don't have to use a separate setter, I just wanted to make it more clear - if you want your class to directly fiddle with the Subject, you can do that too –  Paul Betts Aug 25 '10 at 18:01
    
Paul, just saw your MVVM + RX framework on the RX forums. Very interesting indeed. My reason for asking this whole question is for use in view models in Silverlight. Maybe I should take a hard look at your framework. –  Judah Himango Aug 26 '10 at 18:20
4  
I'm not particularly worried about that - it's like worrying that people will use Reflection to access private fields, I don't think clients of my code are actively out to get me –  Paul Betts Sep 2 '10 at 1:28

Ok guys, seeing as how I think it's at least worth a shot to try this, and seeing as how RX's Subject<T> isn't quite what I'm looking for, I've created a new observable that fits my needs:

  • Implements IObservable<T>
  • Implements INotifyPropertyChange to work with WPF/Silverlight binding.
  • Provides easy get/set semantics.

I call the class Observable<T>.

Declaration:

/// <summary>
/// Represents a value whose changes can be observed.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of value.</typeparam>
public class Observable<T> : IObservable<T>, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private T value;
    private readonly List<AnonymousObserver> observers = new List<AnonymousObserver>(2);
    private PropertyChangedEventHandler propertyChanged;

    /// <summary>
    /// Constructs a new observable with a default value.
    /// </summary>
    public Observable()
    {
    }

    public Observable(T initalValue)
    {
        this.value = initialValue;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the underlying value of the observable.
    /// </summary>
    public T Value
    {
        get { return this.value; }
        set
        {
            var valueHasChanged = !EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(this.value, value);
            this.value = value;

            // Notify the observers of the value.
            this.observers
                .Select(o => o.Observer)
                .Where(o => o != null)
                .Do(o => o.OnNext(value))
                .Run();

            // For INotifyPropertyChange support, useful in WPF and Silverlight.
            if (valueHasChanged && propertyChanged != null)
            {
               propertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Value"));
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Converts the observable to a string. If the value isn't null, this will return
    /// the value string.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The value .ToString'd, or the default string value of the observable class.</returns>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return value != null ? value.ToString() : "Observable<" + typeof(T).Name + "> with null value.";
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Implicitly converts an Observable to its underlying value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="input">The observable.</param>
    /// <returns>The observable's value.</returns>
    public static implicit operator T(Observable<T> input)
    {
        return input.Value;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Subscribes to changes in the observable.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="observer">The subscriber.</param>
    /// <returns>A disposable object. When disposed, the observer will stop receiving events.</returns>
    public IDisposable Subscribe(IObserver<T> observer)
    {
        var disposableObserver = new AnonymousObserver(observer);
        this.observers.Add(disposableObserver);
        return disposableObserver;
    }

    event PropertyChangedEventHandler INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged
    {
        add { this.propertyChanged += value; }
        remove { this.propertyChanged -= value; }
    }

    class AnonymousObserver : IDisposable
    {
        public IObserver<T> Observer { get; private set; }

        public AnonymousObserver(IObserver<T> observer)
        {
            this.Observer = observer;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            this.Observer = null;
        }
    }
}

Usage:

Consuming is nice and easy. No plumbing!

public class Foo
{
    public Foo()
    {
        Progress = new Observable<T>();
    } 

    public Observable<T> Progress { get; private set; }
}

Usage is simple:

// Getting the value works just like normal, thanks to implicit conversion.
int someValue = foo.Progress;

// Setting the value is easy, too:
foo.Progress.Value = 42;

You can databind to it in WPF or Silverlight, just bind to the Value property.

<ProgressBar Value={Binding Progress.Value} />

Most importantly, you can compose, filter, project, and do all the sexy things RX lets you do with IObservables:

Filtering events:

foo.Progress
   .Where(val => val == 100)
   .Subscribe(_ => MyProgressFinishedHandler());

Automatic unsubscribe after N invocations:

foo.Progress
   .Take(1)
   .Subscribe(_ => OnProgressChangedOnce());

Composing events:

// Pretend we have an IObservable<bool> called IsClosed:
foo.Progress
   .TakeUntil(IsClosed.Where(v => v == true))
   .Subscribe(_ => ProgressChangedWithWindowOpened());

Nifty stuff!

share|improve this answer
4  
I wouldn't recommend managing subjects yourself due to threading issues, etc. See my answer –  Richard Szalay Sep 13 '10 at 12:40
    
I definitely second Richard's comment and answer and would add that the Subject is much more optimised than your solution (in addition to being thread-safe) –  Slugart Feb 11 at 10:11

I'll keep it short and simple:

  1. yes
  2. BehaviorSubject

:)

share|improve this answer

Apart from the fact that your existing eventing code could be terser:

    public event EventHandler ProgressChanged = delegate {};

    ...
       set {
          ... 
          // no need for null check anymore       
          ProgressChanged(this, new EventArgs());
   }

I think by switching to Observable<int> you are just moving complexity from the callee to the caller. What if I just want to read the int?

-Oisin

share|improve this answer
1  
That has the downside of creating an extra object on the heap, as well as raising ProgressChanged even if progress really didn't change. Also, I lose composability using standard events. This actually puts a great burden on the caller, e.g. subscribe to just one event? Caller has to keep track of the event and unsubscribe after invocation. Handler goes out of scope? Caller has to make sure to unhook the event or we get memory leak. Want to compose 2 events together like MouseDown and MouseMove for drag/drop? Caller has to coordinate that whole mess. Composability is good. Rx makes it easy. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 16:15
    
To read the int, I'd be providing some custom observable such that you could say Progress.Value or something. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 16:16
    
@Judah - I suppose it depends on your audience and the more importantly, the overall purpose of your class and the needs of its consumers. Btw, your original code also has a race condition where it checks if the delegate is null; you should take a copy of ProgressChanged in a local and test that for null. I didn't bother pointing it out but if you insist on talking about the heap etc, I figure I should bring it up ;-) –  x0n Aug 25 '10 at 16:29
    
I'm aware of that race condition, see my workaround here: stackoverflow.com/questions/248072/… Nonetheless, a proper check for that race condition only adds yet more humdrum plumbing. Yuck! I'm liking Rx more and more. I just would like to hear the RX community's take on this. –  Judah Himango Aug 25 '10 at 16:33
    
@Judah - sure. I agree, the race condition only bolsters your case. I'm sure the RX community will say "yeah, go for it," but like I said, Observables are more complex to work with than simple events, so your classes' consumers are probably more important to ask. –  x0n Aug 25 '10 at 16:36

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