Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Best way to center a <div> element on a page both vertically and horizontally?

I know that margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; will center on the horizontal, but what is the best way to do it vertically, too?

share|improve this question
    
Here's a simple, clean and stable way to center divs in a container using only CSS. stackoverflow.com/a/31977476/3597276 – Michael_B Aug 13 '15 at 0:19

19 Answers 19

The best and most flexible way

My demo on dabblet.com

The main trick in this demo is that in the normal flow of elements going from top to bottom, so the margin-top: auto is set to zero. However, an absolutely positioned element acts the same for distribution of free space, and similarly can be centered vertically at the specified top and bottom (does not work in IE7).

This trick will work with any sizes of div.

HTML:

<div></div>

CSS:

div {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: red;

    position: absolute;
    top:0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;

    margin: auto;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This is awesome. I have wondered for so long how to do this. I had tried it with top: 0; and left: 0;, but it seems that the addition of bottom: 0; and right: 0; make the difference. Thank you. – user981178 Jan 11 '13 at 3:45
3  
@vladimir-starkov Great solution. Of the CSS solutions presented, this one seems to be the best and most elegant. Keen to test on other browsers. – Prembo Jan 11 '13 at 16:34
48  
This solution only works if your element has a fixed height. See tombul's answer for two solutions that do not change the element's natural height. – Stuart P. Bentley Oct 8 '13 at 21:50
8  
@FlashThunder and please do not edit other answers in such offensive ways: such information is for answers or comments, not for editing – Vladimir Starkov Jan 10 '15 at 3:21
10  
@FlashThunder - Vladimir's right. Your edit defaced this answer and was completely inappropriate. Please don't do that ever again. – Brad Larson Jan 12 '15 at 5:04

Even though this did not work when the OP asked this question, I think, for modern browsers at least, the best solution is to use display: flex or pseudo classes.

You can see an example in the following fiddle. Here is the updated fiddle.

For pseudo classes an example could be:

.centerPseudo {
    display:inline-block;
    text-align:center;
}

.centerPseudo::before{
    content:'';
    display:inline-block;
    height:100%;
    vertical-align:middle;
    width:0px;
}

The usage of display: flex, according to css-tricks and MDN is as follows:

.centerFlex {
  align-items: center;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}

There are other attributes available for flex, which are explained in above mentioned links, with further examples.

If you have to support older browsers, which don't support css3, then you should probably use javascript or the fixed width/height solution shown in the other answers.

share|improve this answer
4  
Pretty sure this needs to be updated for the modern flexbox (display:flex). – Stuart P. Bentley Oct 4 '14 at 1:03
    
Thanks for the reminder, just came around to it. – tombul Jun 10 '15 at 14:11
1  
All browsers from 2012–2013 upwards support flex boxes. From today’s standpoint it should be safe enough to use it for new applications under most circumstances. The only situation I can think of where the older model should be preferred are business customers who rely on older infrastructure and can’t upgrade. – Rafael Aug 23 '15 at 15:56

Simplicity of this technique is stunning:
(This method has its implications though, but if you only need to center element regardless of flow of the rest of the content, it's just fine. Use with care)

Markup:

<div>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum accumsan tellus purus, et mollis nulla consectetur ac. Quisque id elit at diam convallis venenatis eget sed justo. Nunc egestas enim mauris, sit amet tempor risus ultricies in. Sed dignissim magna erat, vel laoreet tortor bibendum vitae. Ut porttitor tincidunt est imperdiet vestibulum. Vivamus id nibh tellus. Integer massa orci, gravida non imperdiet sed, consectetur ac quam. Nunc dignissim felis id tortor tincidunt, a eleifend nulla molestie. Phasellus eleifend leo purus, vel facilisis massa dignissim vitae. Pellentesque libero sapien, tincidunt ut lorem non, porta accumsan risus. Morbi tempus pharetra ex, vel luctus turpis tempus eu. Integer vitae sagittis massa, id gravida erat. Maecenas sed purus et magna tincidunt faucibus nec eget erat. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nunc nec mollis sem.</div>

And CSS:

div {
  background:red;
  position:absolute;
  color:#fff;
  top:50%;
  left:50%;
  padding:15px;
  -ms-transform: translateX(-50%) translateY(-50%);
  -webkit-transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
  transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
}   

This will center element horizontally and vertically too. No negative margins, just power of transforms. Also we should already forget about IE8 shouldn't we?

share|improve this answer
1  
Best answer for dynamically sized content. Thanks! – pmont Sep 6 '15 at 19:36
2  
Yes, I used a lot this method... but, problem come if element is much higher then screen height (where height is unknown) ... top of centered element would be cut. Even if element is putted in parent element where overflow is set to auto or scroll. Same problem using flex. Unfortunately, like last resort I use table to override this problem. Only when centered element will be much, much higher (dynamically populated). – nelek Oct 27 '15 at 6:59
    
I had to set position to relative, probably because my div floats right. – Souradeep Nanda Feb 28 at 3:22
    
by far the best. I just wanted a simple div in the middle without 20 rules lol – codyc4321 May 2 at 21:19

I think there are two ways to make a dive center align through CSS.

.middleDiv {
    position : absolute;    
    width    : 200px;
    height   : 200px;
    left     : 50%;
    top      : 50%;
    margin-left : -100px; /* half of the width  */
    margin-top  : -100px; /* half of the height */
}

This is the simple and best way. for the demo please visit below link:

http://w3webpro.blogspot.in/2013/07/how-to-make-div-horizontally-and.html

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was searching for (Y) – Sarz Dec 10 '14 at 15:37
    
Sorry -1 as it is not fair that there are better answers with lower points... for example this one based on same solution, but much more universal. – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:34
5  
@FlashThunder that is a reason to upvote the others, but not really a reason to downvote this answer. – ANeves Jul 1 '15 at 13:39

Here is a script i wrote a while back (it is written using the jQuery library):

var centerIt = function (el /* (jQuery element) Element to center */) {
    if (!el) {
    	return;
    }
    var moveIt = function () {
        var winWidth = $(window).width();
        var winHeight = $(window).height();
        el.css("position","absolute").css("left", ((winWidth / 2) - (el.width() / 2)) + "px").css("top", ((winHeight / 2) - (el.height() / 2)) + "px");
    }; 
    $(window).resize(moveIt);
    moveIt();
};
share|improve this answer
8  
Sadly, OP did not ask for a JavaScript/jQuery solution. – Blazemonger Jul 1 '14 at 13:31
1  
Isn't it better to use outerHeight(true) and outerWidth(true) instead of height() and width(), since "outer" takes account of all possible margin & padding – John Lee Sep 6 '14 at 16:42
    
Very handy when you don't know the height/width of the div in advance. :o) – Miros Jan 6 '15 at 12:44

If you are looking at the new browsers(IE10+),

then you can make use of transform property to align a div at the center.

<div class="center-block">this is any div</div>

And css for this should be:

.center-block {
  top:50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate3d(-50%,-50%, 0);
  position: absolute;
}

The catch here is that you don't even have to specify the height and width of the div as it takes care by itself.

Also, if you want to position a div at the center of another div, then you can just specify the position of outer div as relative and then this CSS starts working for your div.

How it works:

When you specify left and top at 50%, the div goes at the the bottom right quarter of the page with its top-left end pinned at the center of the page. This is because, the left/top properties(when given in %) are calculated based on height of the outer div(in your case, window).

But transform uses height/width of the element to determine translation, so you div will move left(50% width) and top(50% its height) since they are given in negatives, thus aligning it to the center of the page.

If you have to support older browsers(and sorry including IE9 as well) then the table cell is most popular method to use.

share|improve this answer

Simple solution taking advantage of Flex Display

CSS

 .flexme{
      display: -webkit-box;
      display: -moz-box;
      display: -ms-flexbox;
      display: -webkit-flex;
      display: flex;
    }     

HTML

 <div class = 'flexme' style = 'position:absolute; top:0; bottom:0; right:0; left:0; '>
      <div id = 'div_you_want_centered' style = 'margin:auto;'> 
           This will be Centered 
      </div>
 </div>

Check out http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox/

The first div takes up the whole screen and has a display:flex set for every browser. The second div (centered div) takes advantage of the display:flex div where margin:auto works brilliantly.

Note IE11+ compatibility. (IE10 w/ prefix).

Additionally: Here are some cross browser compatible classes for FlexBox's that I use in my projects so things wont break. Maybe it'll save you some headaches.

CSS

.flexme{
    display: -webkit-box;      /* OLD - iOS 6-, Safari 3.1-6 */
    display: -moz-box;         /* OLD - Firefox 19- (buggy but mostly works) */
    display: -ms-flexbox;      /* TWEENER - IE 10 */
    display: -webkit-flex;     /* NEW - Chrome */
    display: flex;             /* NEW, Spec - Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
    }
 .flexrow { 
    display: -webkit-box;      /* OLD - iOS 6-, Safari 3.1-6 */
    display: -moz-box;         /* OLD - Firefox 19- (buggy but mostly works) */
    display: -ms-flexbox;      /* TWEENER - IE 10 */
    display: -webkit-flex;     /* NEW - Chrome */
    display: flex;             /* NEW, Spec - Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
    -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
    flex-flow: row wrap;
}   
 .flexcol { 
    display: -webkit-box;      /* OLD - iOS 6-, Safari 3.1-6 */
    display: -moz-box;         /* OLD - Firefox 19- (buggy but mostly works) */
    display: -ms-flexbox;      /* TWEENER - IE 10 */
    display: -webkit-flex;     /* NEW - Chrome */
    display: flex;             /* NEW, Spec - Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
    -webkit-flex-flow: column wrap;
    flex-flow: column wrap;
}   
 .flex1 {
     -webkit-box-flex: 1;      /* OLD - iOS 6-, Safari 3.1-6 */
     -moz-box-flex: 1;         /* OLD - Firefox 19- */
     -webkit-flex: 1;          /* Chrome */
     -ms-flex: 1;              /* IE 10 */
     flex: 1;                  /* NEW, Spec - Opera 12.1, Firefox 20+ */
 }

I also have classes flexcolnowrap and flexrownowrap (in which the word wrap is replaced with nowrap), as well as flex2, flex3, and up to 6 for convenience.

share|improve this answer
1  
Whoah... IE11+! No thank you! – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:17
1  
Best solution from all! Thanks a lot!!!! – Lichtamberg Mar 4 '15 at 13:36
    
Absolutely, the best solution, thanks – fray88 Nov 3 '15 at 21:36
div {
    border-style: solid;
    position: fixed;
    width: 80%;
    height: 80%;
    left: 10%;
    top: 10%;
}

Adjust left and top with respect to width and height, that is (100% - 80%) / 2 = 10%

share|improve this answer
1  
This is kinda' awesome! +10 (well i can't, sorry only +1) – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:22

There is actually a solution, using css3, which can vertically center a div of unknown height. The trick is to move the div down by 50%, then use transformY to get it back up to the middle. The only prerequisite is that the to-be-centered element has a parent. Example:

<div class="parent">
    <div class="center-me">
        Text, images, whatever suits you.
    </div>
</div>

.parent { 
    /* height can be whatever you want, also auto if you want a child 
       div to be responsible for the sizing */ 
    height: 200px;
}

.center-me { 
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    /* prefixes needed for cross-browser support */
    -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
}

Supported by all major browsers, and IE 9 and up (don't bother about IE 8, as it died together with win xp this autumn. Thank god.)

JS Fiddle Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Most browsers didn't fully support unitl novaday versions, thats why this solution (at least in my opinion) is totally usless, sorry. – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:32
    
Ehrm... I actually don't really understand what you're saying. As browsers "didn't" fully support, it was (not totally) useless imo. As current browsers (all major ones and IE9+) do fully support it, this is a viable solution right now, isn't it? Also checkout CanIUse. – giorgio Jan 12 '15 at 8:48
    
This is an elegant solution that works with any sized content, even if the DIV element dimensions dynamically change (e.g. if you use jQuery to modify the contents and the DIV height has to readjust). HOWEVER, there are still bugs in some environments where using transform causes the text to appear blurry. Please take care in using this solution. – Bao Thien Ngo Jan 27 '15 at 17:55
    
Thanks @BaoNgo, a valuable addition. Do you perhaps know in which kind of environments (browser? os? device?) this problem arises? I will alter the answer accordingly! – giorgio Jan 28 '15 at 12:43

I know I am late to the party but here is a way to center a div with unknown dimension inside a parent of unknown dimension.

style:

<style>

    .table {
      display: table;
      height: 100%;
      margin: 0 auto;
    }
    .table-cell {
      display: table-cell;
      vertical-align: middle;      
    }
    .centered {
      background-color: red;
    }
  </style>

HTML:

<div class="table">
    <div class="table-cell"><div class="centered">centered</div></div>
</div>

DEMO:

Check out this demo.

share|improve this answer
    
I like it, but using real table feels to be "cleaner" and more valid - generates, although, a bit more code. – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:27

This solution worked for me

    .middleDiv{
        position : absolute;
        height : 90%;
        bottom: 5%;
    }

(or height : 70% / bottom : 15%

height : 40% / bottom :30% ...)

share|improve this answer
    
Not to be unfair, this is kinda' awesome! +10 (well i can't, sorry only +1)... – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:23
2  
No it's not - it doesn't center element horizontally. It's half-solution to the problem. – robjez Jan 16 '15 at 16:16

if you Guys are using jquery ui, you can do this by using .position();

<div class="positionthis"></div>

CSS

.positionthis {
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    position: absolute;
    background:blue;
}

Jquery

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('.positionthis').position({
        of: $(document),
        my: 'center center',
        at: 'center center',
        collision: 'flip flip'
    });
});

I hope this Helps.

jsfiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/vx9gV/

share|improve this answer
    
OP asked for a CSS solution. – Blazemonger Jul 1 '14 at 13:33
    
Sorry, -1, as above. – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:23

One more method (bulletproof) taken from here utilizing 'display:table' rule:

Markup

<div class="container">
  <div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
      <div class="centered">
        ...
      </div>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.outer {
  display: table;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
}
.inner {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
}
.centered {
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;

  width: 50%;
  padding: 1em;
  background: orange;
  color: white;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know that it is the same comment as below, but it is simple duplicate answer, so... I like it, but using real table feels to be "cleaner" and more valid - generates, although, a bit more code. – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:30
2  
@FlashThunder - update your knowledge (I got second answer with new technique utilizing transforms, underneath) and eventually stop using tables for layout ;) – robjez Jan 16 '15 at 16:05

I was looking at Laravel's view file and noticed that they centered text perfectly in the middle. I remembered about this question immediately. This is how they did it:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Laravel</title>

    <!--<link href='//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:100' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>-->

    <style>
        .container {
            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;
            width: 100%;
            height: 100%;
            display: table;

        }

        .inside {
            text-align: center;
            display: table-cell;
            vertical-align: middle;
        }


    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="container">
            <div class="inside">This text is centered</div>
    </div>
</body>

Result looks so:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I guess it only works when it's the only thing. Add more div and other content, and it doesn't seem to work any more. – ADTC Aug 25 '15 at 16:17

My prefered way to center a box both vertically and horizontally, is the following technique :

The outher container

  • should have display: table;

The inner container

  • should have display: table-cell;
  • should have vertical-align: middle;
  • should have text-align: center;

The content box

  • should have display: inline-block;
  • should re-adjust the horizontal text-alignment to eg. text-align: left; or text-align: right;, unless you want text to be centered

The elegance of this technique, is that you can add your content to the content box without worrying about its height or width!

Demo

body {
    margin : 0;
}

.outer-container {
    position : absolute;
    display: table;
    width: 100%; /* This could be ANY width */
    height: 100%; /* This could be ANY height */
    background: #ccc;
}

.inner-container {
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

.centered-content {
    display: inline-block;
    text-align: left;
    background: #fff;
    padding : 20px;
    border : 1px solid #000;
}
<div class="outer-container">
   <div class="inner-container">
     <div class="centered-content">
        You can put anything here!
     </div>
   </div>
</div>

See also this Fiddle!

share|improve this answer

An alternative answer would be this.

<div id="container"> 
    <div id="centered"> </div>
</div>

and the css:

#container {
    height: 400px;
    width: 400px;
    background-color: lightblue;
    text-align: center;
}

#container:before {
    height: 100%;
    content: '';
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
}

#centered {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: blue;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Solution only for IE9+ ... not that good ... +0 – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:24

Sorry for late reply best way is

  div {
      position: fixed;
      top: 50%;
      left: 50%;
      margin-top: -50px;
      margin-left: -100px;
    }

margin-top and margin-left should be according to your div box size

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't margins be in percent and 25% both? Sorry but this solution seems not to be working (at lest for now), -1 – Flash Thunder Jan 9 '15 at 21:28
    
@FlashThunder Intended answer for just to show the logic, one can make changes according to its need. – Ashish Jan 17 '15 at 16:28

Is the browser supports it, using translate is powerful.

position: absolute;
background-color: red;

width: 70%;     
height: 30%; 

/* The translate % is relative to the size of the div and not the container*/ 
/* 21.42% = ( (100%-70%/2) / 0.7 ) */
/* 116.666% = ( (100%-30%/2) / 0.3 ) */
transform: translate3d( 21.42%, 116.666%, 0);
share|improve this answer

translate may be better than translate3d in some scenarios due to it being supported by a greater number of browsers. http://caniuse.com/#search=translate

.centered {
  position: fixed;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  transform: -webkit-translate(-50%, -50%);
  transform: -ms-translate(-50%, -50%);
}
<div class="centered">This div is centered</div>



This is an edited copy of an answer by someone else that was just deleted while I was editing it, so now I am re-posting the answer.

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Sep 21 '14 at 22:08

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?