Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this value:

double headingAngle = 135.34375;

I would like to convert it to HEX and print the HEX to the console. I have already converted a string and int into their respective HEX values, but a double seems to be much more tricky. Can someone point me in the right direction?

share|improve this question
1  
One reason there is no ready-made function for this is because it is utterly useless. Who can (and wants to) read a double as hex? –  Henk Holterman Aug 25 '10 at 18:33
2  
@Henk There's nothing inherently less useful about representing a non-integer value in hex than in decimal or any other base. We're just more used to decimal. –  Jakob Borg Aug 25 '10 at 18:37
1  
Using headingAngle.ToString("X") works for ints and longs, but when I try to use it for a double the compiler states: "Format specifier was invalid". –  rross Aug 25 '10 at 18:43
1  
@Henk: The hardware I'm working with requires all data to be represented in hex values. I could not answer beyond that. –  rross Aug 25 '10 at 18:45
12  
just answer the question or point him to the direction which does. why bully him? –  Rahul Aug 25 '10 at 18:51
show 9 more comments

5 Answers

Well, I googled for a minute or two and according to this here is a quite ellegant solution

    double d = 12.09;
    Console.WriteLine("Double value: " + d.ToString());
    byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(d);
    Console.WriteLine("Byte array value:");
    Console.WriteLine(BitConverter.ToString(bytes));
share|improve this answer
    
I know this question is quite old, but it's probably worth pointing out that this code won't convert the value of the double to its hexadecimal representation. Rather, it'll write out the hex representation of the bits that are used to store the number internally. For a floating point number, the two are different things! –  Simon Robinson Jul 10 '13 at 11:10
    
Point taken. Although I didn't heard of any standard of hex notation for representation of floating point values. Of course it is important to remember about the hardware spec and all the big/low endian stuff. However standard IEEE 754 is very popular and widely used. So.. –  Bart Jul 12 '13 at 12:23
add comment

Assuming you want to convert to hexadecimal base/radix, the following should do the trick:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine(Base16(135.34375, 10));
    Console.ReadLine();
}

private static string Base16(double number, int fractionalDigits)
{
    return Base(number, fractionalDigits, new char[]{
        '0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9',
        'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F' });
}

private static string Base(double number, int fractionalDigits, params char[] characters)
{
    int radix = characters.Length;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    // The 'whole' part of the number.
    long whole = (long)Math.Floor(number);
    while (whole > 1)
    {
        sb.Insert(0, characters[whole % radix]);
        whole = whole / radix;
    }

    // The fractional part of the number.
    double remainder = number % 1;
    if (remainder > Double.Epsilon || remainder < -Double.Epsilon)
    {
        sb.Append('.');

        double nv;
        for (int i = 0; i < fractionalDigits; i++)
        {
            nv = remainder * radix;
            if (remainder < Double.Epsilon && remainder > -Double.Epsilon)
                break;
            sb.Append(characters[(int)Math.Floor(nv)]);
            remainder = nv % 1;
        }
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

The hexadecimal conversion of 135.34375 is 87.58.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can convert base 10 to base 16 by continually multiplying the fraction by 16, stripping out the 'whole' number, and repeating with the remainder.

So to convert 0.1 Decimal to Hex

0.1 * 16
= 1.6

So 1 becomes the first hex value. Keep going with the remaining 0.6

0.6 * 16 = 9.6

So 9 becomes the second hex value. Keeping going with the remaining 0.6

0.6 * 16 = 9.6

etc.

So 0.1 Decimal = 0.19999.. recurring hex

From memory this works for any radix. Obviously in hex a whole value of 10 would be A etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try adding in the DoubleToHex function found here: http://www.codeproject.com/answers/62658/Double-to-Hex-conversion-Using-Csharp.aspx

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this:

public static string Format(double number, double @base)
{
    StringBuilder format = new StringBuilder();
    if(number < 0)
    {
        format.Append('-');
        number = -number;
    }
    double log = Math.Log(number, @base);
    bool frac = false;
    double order;
    if(log < 0)
    {
        frac = true;
        format.Append(digits[0]);
        format.Append('.');
        order = 1/@base;
    }else{
        order = Math.Pow(@base, Math.Floor(log));
    }
    while(number != 0 || order >= 1)
    {
        double digit = Math.Floor(number/order);
        if(digit >= @base) break;
        number = number-digit*order;
        number = Math.Round(number, 15);
        if(order < 1 && !frac)
        {
            format.Append('.');
            frac = true;
        }
        order /= @base;
        if(digit >= 10)
        {
            format.Append((char)('A'+(digit-10)));
        }else{
            format.Append((char)('0'+digit));
        }
    }
    return format.ToString();
}

Use it like Format(headingAngle, 16). You can also comment out number = Math.Round(number, 15); for more interesting results. ☺

Result is in culture-invariant format. For 135.34375, it returns 87.58.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.