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I keep hearing a lot about functors in C++, can someone give me an overview as to what they are and in what cases they would be useful?

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This subject has been covered in response to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/317450/why-override-operator#317528 –  Luc Touraille Dec 10 '08 at 18:00

16 Answers 16

up vote 396 down vote accepted

A functor is pretty much just a class which defines the operator(). That lets you create objects which "look like" a function:

// this is a functor
struct add_x {
  add_x(int x) : x(x) {}
  int operator()(int y) { return x + y; }

private:
  int x;
};

// Now you can use it like this:
add_x add42(42); // create an instance of the functor class
int i = add42(8); // and "call" it
assert(i == 50); // and it added 42 to its argument

std::vector<int> in; // assume this contains a bunch of values)
std::vector<int> out;
// Pass a functor to std::transform, which calls the functor on every element 
// in the input sequence, and stores the result to the output sequence
std::transform(in.begin(), in.end(), out.begin(), add_x(1)); 
assert(out[i] == in[i] + 1); // for all i

There are a couple of nice things about functors. One is that unlike regular functions, they can contain state. The above example creates a function which adds 42 to whatever you give it. But that value 42 is not hardcoded, it was specified as a constructor argument when we created our functor instance. I could create another adder, which added 27, just by calling the constructor with a different value. This makes them nicely customizable.

As the last lines show, you often pass functors as arguments to other functions such as std::transform or the other standard library algorithms. You could do the same with a regular function pointer except, as I said above, functors can be "customized" because they contain state, making them more flexible (If I wanted to use a function pointer, I'd have to write a function which added exactly 1 to its argument. The functor is general, and adds whatever you initialized it with), and they are also potentially more efficient. In the above example, the compiler knows exactly which function std::transform should call. It should call add_x::operator(). That means it can inline that function call. And that makes it just as efficient as if I had manually called the function on each value of the vector.

If I had passed a function pointer instead, the compiler couldn't immediately see which function it points to, so unless it performs some fairly complex global optimizations, it'd have to dereference the pointer at runtime, and then make the call.

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6  
Can you explain this line, please std::transform(in.begin(), in.end(), out.begin(), add_x(1)); why you write there add_x, not the add42? –  Alecs Sep 12 '11 at 14:48
27  
@Alecs Both would have worked (but the effect would have been different). If I'd used add42, I would have used the functor I created earlier, and added 42 to each value. With add_x(1) I create a new instance of the functor, one which only adds 1 to each value. It is simply to show that often, you instantiate the functor "on the fly", when you need it, rather than creating it first, and keeping it around before you actually use it for anything. –  jalf Sep 12 '11 at 15:12
5  
Great explanation! I read a tutorial about functor and that garbage made me confuse so much until I read your answer –  Anh Tuan Jun 8 '12 at 1:49
2  
Nice explanation, makes functors very clear. Thanks for sharing this info. –  Manju Mar 5 '13 at 3:55
2  
The operator() in this example should be declared const. –  C.R. Apr 19 at 8:23

Little addition. You can use boost::function, to create functors from functions and methods, like this:

class Foo
{
    void operator () (int i) { printf("Foo %d", i); }
};
void Bar(int i) { printf("Bar %d", i); }
Foo foo;
boost::function<void (int)> f(foo);//wrap functor
f(1);//prints "Foo 1"
boost::function<void (int)> b(&Bar);//wrap normal function
b(1);//prints "Bar 1"

and you can use boost::bind to add state to this functor

boost::function<void ()> f1 = boost::bind(foo, 2);
f1();//no more argument, function argument stored in f1
//and this print "Foo 2" (:
//and normal function
boost::function<void ()> b1 = boost::bind(&Bar, 2);
b1();// print "Bar 2"

and most useful, with boost::bind and boost::function you can create functor from class method, actually this is a delegate:

class SomeClass
{
    std::string state_;
public:
    SomeClass(const char* s) : state_(s) {}

    void method( std::string param )
    {
        std::cout << state_ << param << std::endl;
    }
};
SomeClass *inst = new SomeClass("Hi, i am ");
boost::function< void (std::string) > callback;
callback = boost::bind(&SomeClass::method, inst, _1);//create delegate
//_1 is a placeholder it holds plase for parameter
callback("useless");//prints "Hi, i am useless"

You can create list or vector of functors

std::list< boost::function<void (EventArg e)> > events;
//add some events
....
//call them
std::for_each(
        events.begin(), events.end(), 
        boost::bind( boost::apply<void>(), _1, e));

There is one problem with all this stuff, compiler error messages is not human readable :)

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2  
Vector of functors -- that's worth two upvotes! –  Kyle Simek Mar 26 '10 at 20:53

A Functor is a object which acts like a function. Basically, a class which defines operator().

class MyFunctor
{
   public:
     int operator()(int x) { return x * 2;}
}

MyFunctor doubler;
int x = doubler(5);

The real advantage is that a functor can hold state.

class Matcher
{
   int target;
   public:
     Matcher(int m) : target(m) {}
     int operator()(int x) { return x == target;}
}

Matcher Is5(5);

if (Is5(n))    // same as if (n == 5)
{ ....}
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5  
Just need to add that they can be used just like a function pointer. –  Loki Astari Dec 10 '08 at 18:04
1  
@LokiAstari - For those that are new to the concept, that could be a bit misleading. Functors can be "used like", but not always "in place of" function pointers. For example, a function that takes a function pointer cannot take a functor in its place even if the functor has the same arguments and return value as the function pointer. But by and large when designing, functors are the preferred and theoretically "more modern" way to go. –  MasonWinsauer Mar 12 at 21:49

Like others have mentioned, a functor is an object that acts like a function, i.e. it overloads the function call operator.

Functors are commonly used in STL algorithms. They are useful because they can hold state before and between function calls, like a closure in functional languages. For example, you could define a MultiplyBy functor that multiplies it's argument by a specified amount:

class MultiplyBy {
private:
    int factor;

public:
    MultiplyBy(int x) : factor(x) {
    }

    int operator () (int other) const {
        return factor * other;
    }
};

Then you could pass a MultiplyBy object to an algorithm like std::transform:

int array[5] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
std::transform(array, array + 5, array, MultiplyBy(3));
// Now, array is {3, 6, 9, 12, 15}

Another advantage of a functor over a pointer to a function is that the call can be inlined in more cases. If you passed a function pointer to transform, unless that call got inlined and the compiler knows that you always pass the same function to it, it can't inline the call through the pointer.

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1  
+1 for mentioning 'inline'; a key difference. –  Richard Corden Dec 10 '08 at 18:20

Used instead of plain function:

Pros:

  • Functor may have state
  • Functor fits into OOP

Cons:

  • There is more typing, a bit longer compilation time etc.


Used instead of function pointer:

Pros:

  • Functor often may be inlined

Cons:

  • Functor can not be swapped with other functor type during runtime (at least unless it extends some base class, which therefore gives some overhead)


Used instead of polymorphism:

Pros:

  • Functor (non-virtual) doesn't require vtable and runtime dispatching, thus it is more efficient in most cases

Cons:

  • Functor can not be swapped with other functor type during runtime (at least unless it extends some base class, which therefore gives some overhead)
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Can you explain these use case in real example? how can we use functors as polymorphism adn funtion pointer? –  Khajavi Feb 21 '13 at 17:40
    
What actually does mean that a functor holds state? –  Erogol Apr 15 '13 at 12:05

For the newbies like me among us: after a little research I figured out what the code jalf posted did.

A functor is a class or struct object which can be "called" like a function. This is made possible by overloading the () operator. The () operator (not sure what its called) can take any number of arguments. Other operators only take two ie. the + operator can only take two values (one on each side of the operator) and return whatever value you have overloaded it for. You can fit any number of arguments inside a () operator which is what gives it its flexibity.

To create a functor first you create your class. Then you create a constructor to the class with a parameter of your choice of type and name. This is followed in the same statement by an initializer list (which uses a single colon operator, something I was also new to) which consructs the class member objects with the previously declared parameter to the constructor. Then the () operator is overloaded. Finally you declare the private objects of the class or struct you have created.

My code (I found jalf's variable names confusing)

class myFunctor
{ 
    public:
        /* myFunctor is the constructor. parameterVar is the parameter passed to
           the constructor. : is the initializer list operator. myObject is the
           private member object of the myFunctor class. parameterVar is passed
           to the () operator which takes it and adds it to myObject in the
           overloaded () operator function. */
        myFunctor (int parameterVar) : myObject( parameterVar ) {}

        /* the "operator" word is a keyword which indicates this function is an 
           overloaded operator function. The () following this just tells the
           compiler that () is the operator being overloaded. Following that is
           the parameter for the overloaded operator. This parameter is actually
           the argument "parameterVar" passed by the constructor we just wrote.
           The last part of this statement is the overloaded operators body
           which adds the parameter passed to the member object. */
        int operator() (int myArgument) { return myObject + myArgument; }

    private: 
        int myObject; //Our private member object.
}; 

If any of this is inaccurate or just plain wrong feel free to correct me!

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+1 Good to know what distinguishes operator() from others: any number of arguments. Good newbie explanation! –  Chap Aug 11 '13 at 23:30
    
The () operator is called the function-call operator. I guess you could also call it the parentheses operator. –  Gautam Oct 12 '13 at 20:19

Here's an actual situation where I was forced to use a Functor to solve my problem:

I have a set of functions (say, 20 of them), and they are all identical, except each calls a different specific function in 3 specific spots.

This is incredible waste, and code duplication. Normally I would just pass in a function pointer, and just call that in the 3 spots. (So the code only needs to appear once, instead of twenty times.)

But then I realized, in each case, the specific function required a completely different parameter profile! Sometimes 2 parameters, sometimes 5 parameters, etc.

Another solution would be to have a base class, where the specific function is an overridden method in a derived class. But do I really want to build all of this INHERITANCE, just so I can pass a function pointer????

SOLUTION: So what I did was, I made a wrapper class (a "Functor") which is able to call any of the functions I needed called. I set it up in advance (with its parameters, etc) and then I pass it in instead of a function pointer. Now the called code can trigger the Functor, without knowing what is happening on the inside. It can even call it multiple times (I needed it to call 3 times.)


That's it -- a practical example where a Functor turned out to be the obvious and easy solution, which allowed me to reduce code duplication from 20 functions to 1.

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If your functor called different specific functions, and these other functions varied in the number of parameters they accept, does this mean your functor accepted a variable number of arguments for dispatching to these other functions? –  OpenLearner Feb 28 at 6:09

Except for used in callback, C++ functors can also help to provide a Matlab liking access style to a matrix class. There is a example.

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Functors are used in gtkmm to connect some GUI button to an actual C++ function or method.


If you use the pthread library to make your app multithreaded, Functors can help you.
To start a thread, one of the arguments of the pthread_create(..) is the function pointer to be executed on his own thread.
But there's one inconvenience. This pointer can't be a pointer to a method, unless it's a static method, or unless you specify it's class, like class::method. And another thing, the interface of your method can only be:

void* method(void* something)

So you can't run (in a simple obvious way), methods from your class in a thread without doing something extra.

A very good way of dealing with threads in C++, is creating your own Thread class. If you wanted to run methods from MyClass class, what I did was, transform those methods into Functor derived classes.

Also, the Thread class has this method: static void* startThread(void* arg)
A pointer to this method will be used as an argument to call pthread_create(..). And what startThread(..) should receive in arg is a void* casted reference to an instance in heap of any Functor derived class, which will be casted back to Functor* when executed, and then called it's run() method.

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See this article. Essentially, a functor is a wrapper around a function pointer. They are functions with a state.

Excerpt: "Functors are functions with a state. In C++ you can realize them as a class with one or more private members to store the state and with an overloaded operator () to execute the function. Functors can encapsulate C and C++ function pointers employing the concepts templates and polymorphism. You can build up a list of pointers to member functions of arbitrary classes and call them all through the same interface without bothering about their class or the need of a pointer to an instance. All the functions just have got to have the same return-type and calling parameters. Sometimes functors are also known as closures. You can also use functors to implement callbacks."

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To add on ,I have used function objects to fit an existing legacy method to the command pattern; (only place where the beauty of OO paradigm true OCP I felt ); Also adding here the related function adapter pattern.

Suppose your method has the signature:

int CTask::ThreeParameterTask(int par1, int par2, int par3)

We will see how we can fit it for the Command pattern - for this, first, you have to write a member function adapter so that it can be called as a function object.

Note - this is ugly, and may be you can use the Boost bind helpers etc., but if you can't or don't want to, this is one way.

// a template class for converting a member function of the type int        function(int,int,int)
//to be called as a function object
template<typename _Ret,typename _Class,typename _arg1,typename _arg2,typename _arg3>
class mem_fun3_t
{
  public:
explicit mem_fun3_t(_Ret (_Class::*_Pm)(_arg1,_arg2,_arg3))
    :m_Ptr(_Pm) //okay here we store the member function pointer for later use
    {}

//this operator call comes from the bind method
_Ret operator()(_Class *_P, _arg1 arg1, _arg2 arg2, _arg3 arg3) const
{
    return ((_P->*m_Ptr)(arg1,arg2,arg3));
}
private:
_Ret (_Class::*m_Ptr)(_arg1,_arg2,_arg3);// method pointer signature
};

Also, we need a helper method mem_fun3 for the above class to aid in calling.

template<typename _Ret,typename _Class,typename _arg1,typename _arg2,typename _arg3>
mem_fun3_t<_Ret,_Class,_arg1,_arg2,_arg3> mem_fun3 ( _Ret (_Class::*_Pm)          (_arg1,_arg2,_arg3) )
{
  return (mem_fun3_t<_Ret,_Class,_arg1,_arg2,_arg3>(_Pm));

}

Now, in order to bind the parameters, we have to write a binder function. So, here it goes:

template<typename _Func,typename _Ptr,typename _arg1,typename _arg2,typename _arg3>
class binder3
{
public:
//This is the constructor that does the binding part
binder3(_Func fn,_Ptr ptr,_arg1 i,_arg2 j,_arg3 k)
    :m_ptr(ptr),m_fn(fn),m1(i),m2(j),m3(k){}

 //and this is the function object 
 void operator()() const
 {
        m_fn(m_ptr,m1,m2,m3);//that calls the operator
    }
private:
    _Ptr m_ptr;
    _Func m_fn;
    _arg1 m1; _arg2 m2; _arg3 m3;
};

And, a helper function to use the binder3 class - bind3:

//a helper function to call binder3
template <typename _Func, typename _P1,typename _arg1,typename _arg2,typename _arg3>
binder3<_Func, _P1, _arg1, _arg2, _arg3> bind3(_Func func, _P1 p1,_arg1 i,_arg2 j,_arg3 k)
{
    return binder3<_Func, _P1, _arg1, _arg2, _arg3> (func, p1,i,j,k);
}

Now, we have to use this with the Command class; use the following typedef:

typedef binder3<mem_fun3_t<int,T,int,int,int> ,T* ,int,int,int> F3;
//and change the signature of the ctor
//just to illustrate the usage with a method signature taking more than one parameter
explicit Command(T* pObj,F3* p_method,long timeout,const char* key,
long priority = PRIO_NORMAL ):
m_objptr(pObj),m_timeout(timeout),m_key(key),m_value(priority),method1(0),method0(0),
method(0)
{
    method3 = p_method;
}

Here is how you call it:

F3 f3 = PluginThreadPool::bind3( PluginThreadPool::mem_fun3( 
      &CTask::ThreeParameterTask), task1,2122,23 );

Note: f3(); will call the method task1->ThreeParameterTask(21,22,23);.

The full context of this pattern at the following link

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A functor is a higher-order function that applies a function to the parametrized(ie templated) types. For example, we could define a functor for std::vector like this:

template<class F, class T, class U=decltype(std::declval<F>()(std::declval<T>()))>
std::vector<U> fmap(F f, const std::vector<T>& vec)
{
    std::vector<U> result;
    std::transform(vec.begin(), vec.end(), std::back_inserter(result), f);
    return result;
}

This function takes a std::vector<T> and returns std::vector<U> when given a function F that takes a T and returns a U. A functor doesn't have to be defined over container types, it can be defined for any templated type as well, including std::shared_ptr:

template<class F, class T, class U=decltype(std::declval<F>()(std::declval<T>()))>
std::shared_ptr<U> fmap(F f, const std::shared_ptr<T>& p)
{
    return std::shared_ptr<U>(new U(f(*p)));
}

Heres a simple example that converts the type to a double:

double to_double(int x)
{
    return x;
}

std::shared_ptr<int> i(new int(3));
std::shared_ptr<double> d = fmap(to_double, i);

std::vector<int> is = { 1, 2, 3 };
std::vector<double> ds = fmap(to_double, is);

There are two laws that functors should follow. The first is the identity law, which states that if the functor is given an identity function, it should be the same as applying the identity function to the type, that is fmap(identity, x) should be the same as identity(x):

struct identity_f
{
    template<class T>
    T operator()(T x) const
    {
        return x;
    }
};
identity_f identity = {};

std::vector<int> is = { 1, 2, 3 };
// These two statements should be equivalent.
// is1 should equal is2
std::vector<int> is1 = fmap(identity, is);
std::vector<int> is2 = identity(is);

The next law is the composition law, which states that if the functor is given a composition of two function, it should be the same as applying the functor for the first function and then again for the second function. So, fmap(std::bind(f, std::bind(g, _1)), x) should be the same as fmap(f, fmap(g, x)):

double to_double(int x)
{
    return x;
}

struct foo
{
    double x;
};

foo to_foo(double x)
{
    foo r;
    r.x = x;
    return r;
}

std::vector<int> is = { 1, 2, 3 };
// These two statements should be equivalent.
// is1 should equal is2
std::vector<foo> is1 = fmap(std::bind(to_foo, std::bind(to_double, _1)), is);
std::vector<foo> is2 = fmap(to_foo, fmap(to_double, is));
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The Command Pattern suggests many problem/solution domains in which functors may be useful.

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Like has been repeated, functors are classes that can be treated as functions (overload operator ()).

They are most useful for situations in which you need to associate some data with repeated or delayed calls to a function.

For example, a linked-list of functors could be used to implement a basic low-overhead synchronous coroutine system, a task dispatcher, or interruptable file parsing. Examples:

/* prints "this is a very simple and poorly used task queue" */
class Functor
{
public:
    std::string output;
    Functor(const std::string& out): output(out){}
    operator()() const
    {
        std::cout << output << " ";
    }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    std::list<Functor> taskQueue;
    taskQueue.push_back(Functor("this"));
    taskQueue.push_back(Functor("is a"));
    taskQueue.push_back(Functor("very simple"));
    taskQueue.push_back(Functor("and poorly used"));
    taskQueue.push_back(Functor("task queue"));
    for(std::list<Functor>::iterator it = taskQueue.begin();
        it != taskQueue.end(); ++it)
    {
        *it();
    }
    return 0;
}

/* prints the value stored in "i", then asks you if you want to increment it */
int i;
bool should_increment;
int doSomeWork()
{
    std::cout << "i = " << i << std::endl;
    std::cout << "increment? (enter the number 1 to increment, 0 otherwise" << std::endl;
    std::cin >> should_increment;
    return 2;
}
void doSensitiveWork()
{
     ++i;
     should_increment = false;
}
class BaseCoroutine
{
public:
    BaseCoroutine(int stat): status(stat), waiting(false){}
    void operator()(){ status = perform(); }
    int getStatus() const { return status; }
protected:
    int status;
    bool waiting;
    virtual int perform() = 0;
    bool await_status(BaseCoroutine& other, int stat, int change)
    {
        if(!waiting)
        {
            waiting = true;
        }
        if(other.getStatus() == stat)
        {
            status = change;
            waiting = false;
        }
        return !waiting;
    }
}

class MyCoroutine1: public BaseCoroutine
{
public:
    MyCoroutine1(BaseCoroutine& other): BaseCoroutine(1), partner(other){}
protected:
    BaseCoroutine& partner;
    virtual int perform()
    {
        if(getStatus() == 1)
            return doSomeWork();
        if(getStatus() == 2)
        {
            if(await_status(partner, 1))
                return 1;
            else if(i == 100)
                return 0;
            else
                return 2;
        }
    }
};

class MyCoroutine2: public BaseCoroutine
{
public:
    MyCoroutine2(bool& work_signal): BaseCoroutine(1), ready(work_signal) {}
protected:
    bool& work_signal;
    virtual int perform()
    {
        if(i == 100)
            return 0;
        if(work_signal)
        {
            doSensitiveWork();
            return 2;
        }
        return 1;
    }
};

int main()
{
     std::list<BaseCoroutine* > coroutineList;
     MyCoroutine2 *incrementer = new MyCoroutine2(should_increment);
     MyCoroutine1 *printer = new MyCoroutine1(incrementer);

     while(coroutineList.size())
     {
         for(std::list<BaseCoroutine *>::iterator it = coroutineList.begin();
             it != coroutineList.end(); ++it)
         {
             *it();
             if(*it.getStatus() == 0)
             {
                 coroutineList.erase(it);
             }
         }
     }
     delete printer;
     delete incrementer;
     return 0;
}

Of course, these examples aren't that useful in themselves. They only show how functors can be useful, the functors themselves are very basic and inflexible and this makes them less useful than, for example, what boost provides.

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Functor can also be used to simulate defining a local function within a function. Refer to the question and another.

But a local functor can not access outside auto variables. The lambda (C++11) function is a better solution.

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I have "discovered" a very interesting use of functors: I use them when I have not a good name for one method, as a functor is a method without name ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you describe a functor as a "method without name"? –  Anderson Green Jan 8 '13 at 3:05
    
A function without out a name is called a lambda. –  Paul Aug 18 '13 at 15:21

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