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When an error that the PHPunit framework does not expect to occur happens, the testing stops, and PHP throws the error, but PHPunit does not record that it was an error. How do I make sure PHPunit records it as an error.

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Could you expand on that? What kind of errors are you talking about? What is the expected output of phpunit, and what is the actual output? –  janmoesen Aug 25 '10 at 20:25
    
So PHPunit has Assertions, Failures, and Errors from what I understand. So lets say there is a syntax error in the code. An extra comma or missing semi-colon. This will cause a certain test not to be able to run, and the testing will cease, but PHPunit does not report it as an error, and php will output the error, but there is no logging of this by PHPunit. Is there a way to force PHPunit to log something like a syntax error, rather than just logistical code assertions? –  Anthony Aug 25 '10 at 20:50
    
Can you provide a illustrative TestCase for this please (seriously) –  Gordon Aug 25 '10 at 20:53
    
If I have a user class, and within this class I have a register function. I created a TestCase where I register a user. If the syntax is off in the original user class, PHPunit will stop testing the additional tests, and PHP throws an error, while PHPunit records no errors or failures. I apologize for vagueness. –  Anthony Aug 25 '10 at 21:19
    
This is the output (without the actual SQL query) when I run my AllTests script. PHPUnit 3.4.14 by Sebastian Bergmann. ................................mysqlNet::write() Error:insert into table(title,titleSlug,description....) values(...,):table You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near ')' at line 1 –  Anthony Aug 25 '10 at 21:39
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Disclaimer, I'm new to PHPUnit and am trying to figure out the whole 'what happens when an error occurs' too.

From PHPUnit's docs:

When the tested code contains PHP syntax errors, the TextUI test runner might exit without printing error information. The standard test suite loader can optionally check the test suite sourcefile for PHP syntax errors, but not sourcefiles included by the test suite sourcefile.

And the option:

--syntax-check           Try to check source files for syntax errors.
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See my last comment to the original question. (It is hidden by default.) There does not seem to be a PHP syntax error; merely an SQL syntax error. –  janmoesen Aug 31 '10 at 7:55
    
@janmoesen I know, but in the comments the OP also says, "So lets say there is a syntax error in the code. An extra comma or missing semi-colon. This will cause a certain test not to be able to run, and the testing will cease, but PHPunit does not report it as an error, and php will output the error, but there is no logging of this by PHPunit." –  Tim Lytle Aug 31 '10 at 21:10
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What the OP is talking about is a syntax or PHP error will kill PHPUnit. PHP Fatal errors kill the PHP Interpreter (or cause it to halt at least), which means PHPUnit cannot proceed.

If you really wanted to avoid this case you could add some of the following bits in a script. This script assumes the script is in the directory with your tests (./) and that your code tree starts at ../ (similar setup to a normal ZendFramework 1 setup). Dont bother with using code coverage with this script, it will only be correct for the last run unittest:

#!/bin/bash
   for i in $(find ../ -name "*.php"); do
        msg=`php -l $i`
        if [ "$?" != "0" ]; then
            echo $msg;
        fi
    done

   for i in $(find ./ -name "*Test.php"); do
     echo "Running Test: $i";

     phpunit $i
    done

HTH.

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You would need to capture the error using the normal PHP Error capture to avoid the crash to the OS, which happens when the PHP Interpreter encounters the error.

Automated tests should be checked and tested before being committed to your main development stream.

I capture the output from PHPUnit (phpunit ... > PHPUnit.log) which I then parse looking for the status from PHPUnit (Success with Skipped/Incomplete, OK, FAILURE, etc...) and if this is not found, then I know PHPUnit did not complete, and an error occurred. The results of the error will have also been dumped to the terminal since I have my PHP configured to show errors.

On an error, I simply mail this log file to the development team, or the person who last changed the test file, to investigate. Logic for the email may get complex if the scripts try to decide the root cause/person to send the mail to. Usually, the script emails myself to investigate, and the development team is CC'd on the email in case I am away or unavailable to investigate right away.

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