Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Parameter pack expansion is reversed by the VS2015 compiler.

I have the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>


template <typename... T>
void f_Swallow(T &&...)
{
}

template <typename... T>
std::vector<int> f(T ...arg)
{
    std::vector<int> result;
    f_Swallow
    (
        [&]()
        {

            result.push_back(arg);
            return true;
        }
        ()...
    ) ;
    return result;
}


using namespace std;
int main()
{
    auto vec = f(1,2,3,4);

    for (size_t i = 0; i < vec.size(); ++i)
        cout << vec[i] << endl;
}

When I run this code in XCode (clang-700.1.81), I get this result:

1
2
3
4

But the same code run in VS2015 produces this output:

4
3
2
1

Why are the parameter packs expanded differently depending on the compiler? Is there a way to fix it without checking the platform and compiler version? Doesn't the standard guarantee anything about expansion order?

share|improve this question
9  
Isn't this just unspecified evaluation order? (side note: typically in swallow idiom array brace initializer is used just to avoid this problem) – milleniumbug Feb 29 at 14:39
    
@milleniumbug, you are correct. And you should post that as an answer (albeit with some more explaining). – StoryTeller Feb 29 at 14:40
2  
The correct way to do this is with an initializer list, which guarantees the order of construction: auto dummy = {(result.push_back(arg), 0)...}; Demo – Igor Tandetnik Feb 29 at 14:43
    
Heh. Nice.​​​​​ – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 29 at 14:45
    
Why your code fails with gcc: goo.gl/uTtFiC – Al Bundy Mar 3 at 8:22
up vote 44 down vote accepted

It's not the order of parameter pack expansion which is different, it's the order of function argument evaluation.

f_Swallow
(
    [&]()
    {

        result.push_back(arg);
        return true;
    }
    ()...
) ;

For sake of brevity, lets just give that lambda the name funcN where N is the parameter number. Given four arguments, the parameter pack will be expanded by any conforming compiler into this:

f_Swallow(func1(), func2(), func3, func4()) ;

The order of evaluation of function arguments is unspecified in C++. The compiler could evaluate them in-order (like your version of Clang), in reverse order (like your version of MSVC), or in any order it likes. You cannot count on the evaluation order.

To get what you want, you could put the expressions into a context in which the order of evaluation is specified. For example:

template <typename... T>
std::vector<int> f(T ...arg)
{
    std::vector<int> result;
    (void)std::initializer_list<int> { (result.push_back(arg), 0)... };
    return result;
}

In C++17, you'll be able to do the following with fold expressions:

template <typename... T>
std::vector<int> f(T ...arg)
{
    std::vector<int> result;
    (result.push_back(arg), ...);
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

I figured that it could be also written just like this:

template <typename... T>
std::vector<int> f(T ...arg)
{
    std::vector<int> result{ arg... };
    return result;
}

No need to create dummy std::initializer_list

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, yes, that's the best solution for the case when you just want to create a std::vector from your parameters. – TartanLlama Feb 29 at 16:02
    
Out of interest, what is useful about this, vs. vector's own initializer_list constructor, which it calls anyway? Currently it looks to me like all it does is waste lines of text, but I might be missing something obvious. – underscore_d Feb 29 at 23:51
    
In my case, the function was used in like this auto vec = f(); in many places, so it was easier to fix the function, rather changing all calls. – ALEXANDER KONSTANTINOV Mar 1 at 7:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.