Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am very new to python and just installed Eric6 I am wanting to search a folder (and all sub dirs) to print the filename of any file that has the extension of .pdf I have this as my syntax, but it errors saying

The debugged program raised the exception unhandled FileNotFoundError
"[WinError 3] The system can not find the path specified 'C:'"
File: C:\Users\pcuser\EricDocs\Test.py, Line: 6

And this is the syntax I want to execute:

import os

results = []
testdir = "C:\Test"
for folder in testdir:
  for f in os.listdir(folder):
    if f.endswith('.pdf'):
        results.append(f)

print (results)
share|improve this question
    
Is "C:\Test" your actual real directory name, or are you anonymizing it because the real directory is "C:\users\your_real_name" or something? – Kevin Feb 29 at 15:18
    
Why for folder in testdir ??? .. You are looping through tesdir string instead not each folder in testdir – Iron Fist Feb 29 at 15:19
    
@Kevin - that is the real directory I am wanting to scan. I created a "Test" directory and placed a few diff file types in it to run this snippet on. – Michael Mormon Feb 29 at 15:20
    
@IronFist - I am needing to do a recursive search, and once pushed to production environment the direcotry may/may not contain sub directories. – Michael Mormon Feb 29 at 15:21
    
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use the glob module.

The glob module finds all the pathnames matching a specified pattern

import glob, os
parent_dir = 'path/to/dir'
for pdf_file in glob.glob(os.path.join(parent_dir, '*.pdf')):
    print (pdf_file)

This will work on Windows and *nix platforms.


Just make sure that your path is fully escaped on windows, could be useful to use a raw string.

In your case, that would be:

import glob, os
parent_dir = r"C:\Test"
for pdf_file in glob.glob(os.path.join(parent_dir, '*.pdf')):
    print (pdf_file)

For only a list of filenames (not full paths, as per your comment) you can do this one-liner:

results = [os.path.basename(f) for f in glob.glob(os.path.join(parent_dir, '*.pdf')]
share|improve this answer
    
This code executes perfectly! One question, can you use single or double quotes in python? – Michael Mormon Feb 29 at 15:25
    
You can use either, it's just convention. – Inbar Rose Feb 29 at 15:26
    
I also added in this as I only wanted filenames not full dir info (but I didn't say that in my question) print (os.path.basename(pdf_file)) – Michael Mormon Feb 29 at 15:35
    
@MichaelMormon: If you're going to print your code use single quotes because this will use less ink. :-) – Matthias Feb 29 at 16:14

Right now, you search each character string inside of testdir's variable.

so it's searching the folder for values "C", ":", "\", "T" etc. You'll want to also escape your escape character like "C:\...\...\"

You probably was to use os.listdir(testdir) instead.

share|improve this answer

Try running your Python script from C:. From the Command Prompt, you might wanna do this:

> cd C:\    
> python C:\Users\pcuser\EricDocs\Test.py

As pointed out by Tony Babarino, use r"C:\Test" instead of "C:\Test" in your code.

share|improve this answer

There are a few problems in your code, take a look at how I've modified it below:

import os

results = []
testdir = "C:\\Test"
for f in os.listdir(testdir):
    if f.endswith('.pdf'):
        results.append(f)

print (results)

Note that I have escaped your path name, and removed your first if folder.... That wasn't getting the folders as you expected, but rather selecting a character of the path string one at a time.

You will need to modify the code to get it to look through all folders, this currently doesn't. Take a look at the glob module.

share|improve this answer

You will need to escape the backslash on windows and you can use os.walk to get all the pdf files.

   for root,dirs,files in os.walk(testdir):
       for f in files:
           if f.endswith('.pdf'):
            results.append(f)
   print (results)
share|improve this answer

You are basically iterating through the string testdir with the first for loop then passing each character to os.listdir(folder) does not make any sense then, just remove that first for loop and use fnmatch method from fnmatch module:

import os
from fnmatch import fnmatch

ext = '*.pdf'
results = []
testdir = "C:\Test"
for f in os.listdir(testdir):
    if fnmatch(f, ext):
        results.append(f)

print (results)
share|improve this answer

Try testdir = r"C:\Test" instead of testdir = "C:\Test". In python You have to escape special characters like for example \. You can escape them also with symbol '\' so it would be "C:\\Test". By using r"C:\Test", You are telling python to use raw string.

Also for folder in testdir: line doesn't make sense because testdir is a string so You are basically trying to iterate over a string.

share|improve this answer
    
Using raw strings to avoid accidental escape characters is a good idea in general, but I don't think it's responsible for the error here. "\T" doesn't escape to a tab character if the T is in caps. – Kevin Feb 29 at 15:19
    
Changing it to r"C:\Test" produces the same error. – Michael Mormon Feb 29 at 15:21
    
delete for folder in testdir: line and it will work – Tony Babarino Feb 29 at 15:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.