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I have to overload a == operator in C++ for a class with many attributes.
The operator should return true, if and only if all attributes are equal. A shortcut might be useful, if these attributes change over time, to avoid bugs.

Is there a shortcut to compare every attribute in a class?

share|improve this question
    
You can use memcmp if your object is POD or some large part of it POD(on that part) – VladimirS Feb 29 at 16:32
    
You can write a script (in your editor if it supports it. Vim regular expression substitutions could do it, for example) to take a copy of the declaration lines and turn them into element == other.element && – Zan Lynx Feb 29 at 16:34
8  
@user3545806 memcmp won't account for padding, so that won't work. – Barry Feb 29 at 16:35
    
@Barry, will it work if you memset POD part first and then use memcmp? But obviously you are right, my comment has missing that note. – VladimirS Feb 29 at 16:44
1  
@VladimirS (and @Barry) regarding memcmp - I think it's worse than you're stating here. Even with POD, even if the POD is pre-initialized (e.g. zero'd), the user can get burned in a corner case with a discriminated union. Let's say the user has a union with a char and an int (suppose 8 bits and 32 bits), and a "tag" outside the union to discriminate if we should read the char or the int from the union. If the "char" is "active" in the union per the tag, and semantically they are identical, the memcmp could still fail. – Dan Mar 6 at 15:08
up vote 40 down vote accepted

There is no shortcut. You will have to list everything.

Some sources of error can be reduced by introducing a member function named tied() like:

struct Foo {
    A a;
    B b;
    C c;
    ...

private:
    auto tied() const { return std::tie(a, b, c, ...); }
};

So that your operator== can just use that:

bool operator==(Foo const& rhs) const { return tied() == rhs.tied(); }

This lets you only list all your members once. But that's about it. You still have to actually list them (so you can still forget one).


There is a proposal (P0221R0) to create a default operator==, but I don't know if it will get accepted.

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@Downvoter What's up? – Barry Feb 29 at 21:15

Starting in C++11 with the introduction of tuples we also got std::tie(). This will let use make a tuple out of a bunch of variables and call a comparison function against all of them. You can use it like

struct Foo
{
    int a,b,c,d,e,f;
    bool operator==(const Foo& rhs) { return std::tie(a,b,c,d,e,f) == std::tie(rhs.a,rhs.b,rhs.c,rhs.d,rhs.e,rhs.f); }
};

You still have to list all the members you want to check but it makes it easier. You can also use this to make less than and greater than comparisons much easier.

It should also be noted that the variables are checked in the order you provide them to tie. This is important for less than and greater than comparisons.

std::tie(a,b) < std::tie(rhs.a, rhs.b);

Does not have to be the same as

std::tie(b,a) < std::tie(rhs.b, rhs.a);
share|improve this answer

At the moment, there is no shortcut but there are plans to add support for it (P0221R0).

Bjarne Stroustrup recently wrote a blog post about it: A bit of background for the default comparison proposal

In C++14, there is nothing better than listing all members and comparing them, which is error prone. To quote Bjarne:

The killer argument for default comparisons is not actually convenience, but the fact that people get their equality operators wrong.

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The only way of doing it is unfortunatly to check all attributes. The good thing is if you combine all your checks using && it will stop evaluating after the first false statement. (short-circuit evaluation)

So e.g. false && (4 == 4). The program would never evaluate the 4 == 4 part since all statements combined by && need to be true to get true as a final outcome. Does this make sense?

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This is called short-circuit evaluation. There's really no other alternative to it. – erip Feb 29 at 16:43
    
Additionally, concatenated isn't the right word here. – erip Feb 29 at 16:45
    
@erip I'm sorry. I'm no native speaker. What would be a better word in this situation? – muXXmit2X Feb 29 at 16:46
    
Concatenation means append. We need to preceding conjunctions to be true. – erip Feb 29 at 16:55

There is a not to the operator==related solution possible. You can generate the related code from a definition table with the help of so called X-Macro. The table could look like

#define MEMBER_TBL                    \
/*type        ,name ,default*/        \
X(int         ,_(i) ,42     )         \
X(float       ,_(f) ,3.14   )         \
X(std::string ,  t  ,"Hello")         \

The _()stuff is needed to avoid a trailing , on generation the std::tie() call. Make sure that the last element is w.o. _(). The usage to generate the members is:

struct Foo
{
#define _(x) x
#define X(type, name, default) type name{default};
    MEMBER_TBL
#undef X
#undef _
}

This generates:

struct Foo
{
    int i{42}; float f{3.14}; std::string t{"Hello"};
}

To generate the operator==you can use:

bool operator==(Foo const& other) const {
        return  std::tie(
#define _(x) x,
#define X(type, name, default) this->name
            MEMBER_TBL
#undef X
        ) == std::tie(
#define X(type, name, default) other.name
            MEMBER_TBL
#undef X
#undef _
        );
    }

which results into

bool operator==(Foo const& other) const {
    return std::tie(
                     this->i, this->f, this->t
    ) == std::tie(
                  other.i, other.f, other.t
    );
}

To add new members you can add simply a new entry to the first table. Everything else is generated automatically.

Another advantage is, you can add simply a dump() method like

void print(void) const { 
    #define STR(x) #x
    #define _(x) x
    #define X(type, name, default)            \
            std::cout <<                      \
                STR(name) << ": " << name << " ";
            MEMBER_TBL
    #undef X
    #undef _
    #undef STR
            std::cout << std::endl;
        }

which results into

void print() const {
    std::cout << "i" << ": " << i << " "; std::cout << "f" << ": " << f << " "; std::cout << "t" << ": " << t << " ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Every information regarding to the members could be added to the table at one place (single point of information) and extracted elsewhere needed.

A working Demo.

share|improve this answer
    
It is worth mentioning that this technique should be reserved for very expectional cases only. For instance, I used it in one example where I had a class of config parameters. Whenever you had to introduced a new parameter, you had to update several location in the code, which was quite error prone. IMHO using the X Macro approach simplified the maintainance but it remains a bit controversal, so I would only recommend it as a last resort. But knowing that the technique exists, is indeed useful. – Philipp Claßen Mar 3 at 22:12

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