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I want to allow user contributed Javascript in areas of my website.

  1. Is this completely insane?
  2. Are there any Javascript sanitizer scripts or good regex patterns out there to scan for alerts, iframes, remote script includes and other malicious Javascript?
  3. Should this process be manually authorized (by a human checking the Javascript)?
  4. Would it be more sensible to allow users to only use a framework (like jQuery) rather than giving them access to actual Javascript? This way it might be easier to monitor.

Thanks

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What do you want to allow your users to do ? –  vlad b. Aug 25 '10 at 23:48
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To create their own widgets, to rearrange or hide page elements to their liking, etc. –  Tom Aug 25 '10 at 23:51
    
If that is what the users are going to be doing with the javascript, you might as well just provide them the functionality in your own code, user preferences, which they toggle within thier account. You could provide them a place to add a widget, which you validate, and then provide the sound widgets to the rest of the community. –  John Aug 26 '10 at 2:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1. Is this completely insane?

Don't think so, but near. Let's see.

2. Are there any Javascript sanitizer scripts or good regex patterns out there to scan for alerts, iframes, remote script includes and other malicious Javascript?

Yeah, at least there are Google Caja and ADSafe to sanitize the code, allowing it to be sandboxed. I don't know up to what degree of trustworthiest they provide, though.

3. Should this process be manually authorized (by a human checking the Javascript)?

It may be possible that sandbox fails, so it would be a sensible solution, depending on the risk and the trade-off of being attacked by malicious (or faulty) code.

4. Would it be more sensible to allow users to only use a framework (like jQuery) rather than giving them access to actual Javascript? This way it might be easier to monitor.

JQuery is just plain Javascript, so if you're trying to protect from attacks, it won't help at all.

If it is crucial to prevent these kind of attacks, you can implement a custom language, parse it in the backend and produce the controlled, safe javascript; or you may consider another strategy, like providing an API and accessing it from a third-party component of your app.

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Host it on a different domain. Same-origin security policy in browsers will then prevent user-submitted JS from attacking your site.

It's not enough to host it on a different subdomain, because subdomains can set cookies on higher-level domain, and this could be used for session fixation attacks.

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It might be safer to design/implement your own restricted scripting language, which can be very similar to JavaScript, but which is under the control of your own interpreter.

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Do you know of any open source projects that may already be doing this? –  John Aug 26 '10 at 2:26

Take a look at Google Caja:

Caja allows websites to safely embed DHTML web applications from third parties, and enables rich interaction between the embedding page and the embedded applications. It uses an object-capability security model to allow for a wide range of flexible security policies, so that the containing page can effectively control the embedded applications' use of user data and to allow gadgets to prevent interference between gadgets' UI elements.

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I think the correct answer is 1.

As soon as you allow Javascript, you open yourself and your users to all kinds of issues. There is no perfect way to clean Javascript, and people like the Troll Army will take it as their personal mission to mess you up.

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Think about all of the things YOU can do with javascript. Then think about the things you would do if you could do it on someone elses site. These are things that people will do just because they can, or to find out if they can. I don't think it is a good idea at all.

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  1. Probably. The scope for doing bad things is going to be much greater than it is when you simply allow HTML but try to avoid alloing JavaScript.
  2. I do not know.
  3. Well, two things: do you really want to spend your time doing this, and if you do this you had better make sure they see the javascript code rather than actual live JavaScript!
  4. I can't see why this would make any difference, unless you do have someone approving posts and that person happens to be more at home with jQuery than plain JavaScript.
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Instead of checking for evil things like script includes, I would go for regex-based whitelisting of the few commands you expect to be used. Then involve a human to authorize and add new acceptable commands to the whitelist.

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