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If you happen to have

from <module> import *

in the middle of your program (or module), you would get the warning:

/tmp/foo:100: SyntaxWarning: import * only allowed at module level

I understand why import * is discouraged in general (namespace invisibility), but there are many situations where it would prove convenient, especially where code is not shared with anyone.

So, can anyone explain precisely in detail why from <module> import * should be prohibited in all possible cases?

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which IDE you are using which throws warning? –  avi Feb 5 at 4:50
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I believe by "in the middle of your program" you are talking about an import inside a function definition:

def f():
    from module import *    # not allowed

This is not allowed because it would make optimizing the body of the function too hard. The Python implementation wants to know all of the names of function-local variables when it byte-compiles a function, so that it can optimize variable references into operations on the (CPython) virtual machine's operand stack, or at least to local variable-slot operations rather than lookups in outer namespaces. If you could dump the entire contents of a module into a function's local namespace, then the compiler would have to assume that any name in the function might possibly refer to a module global, because the list of names brought in by from module import * is only known at runtime.

Putting from module import * in between top-level declarations is poor style, but it's allowed:

def f():
    ...

from module import *

def g():
    ...

EDIT April 2013: While looking into something else, I discovered that this restriction was introduced in Python 2.1, as a consequence of the "Nested Scopes" feature (PEP 227). Quoting from the link:

One side effect of the change is that the from module import * and exec statements have been made illegal inside a function scope under certain conditions. The Python reference manual has said all along that from module import * is only legal at the top level of a module, but the CPython interpreter has never enforced this before. As part of the implementation of nested scopes, the compiler which turns Python source into bytecodes has to generate different code to access variables in a containing scope. from module import * and exec make it impossible for the compiler to figure this out, because they add names to the local namespace that are unknowable at compile time. Therefore, if a function contains function definitions or lambda expressions with free variables, the compiler will flag this by raising a SyntaxError exception.

This clarifies the Python 3.x vs 2.x behavior discussed in the comments. It is always contrary to the language specification, but CPython 2.1 through 2.7 only issue an error for from module import * within a function if it might affect the compiler's ability to know whether a variable binds locally or in a containing scope. In 3.x it has been promoted to an unconditional error.

SON OF EDIT: ... and apparently flashk pointed this out years ago in another answer, quoting the same paragraph of "What's New in Python 2.1" yet. Y'all go upvote that now.

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2  
Thanks for analysis, Zack. It seems: (1) import * is allowed in a function body (with a warning) if it isn't, or doesn't have, any nested block; (2) Though Python doc says it isn't allowed except at the top level of a module, it is never enforced (i.e., still possible); (3) If the byte compiler can execute the module so it knows all variables and functions, it won't be a problem for optimization; (4) Just show me an example of what became wrong with the nested scope, Python. –  OTZ Aug 26 '10 at 2:22
    
@Zack - Free variables are those bound in an enclosing scope. So if you have a module global assignment x = 3 and a function def foo(): print x, then x is a free variable of foo. It's not a weasel word - see docs.python.org/reference/executionmodel.html for the definition. "If a variable is used in a code block but not defined there, it is a free variable." –  Jeremy Brown Aug 26 '10 at 2:31
    
@Jeremy: What I meant with "weasel words" is that the language rule is that you can only use "from X import *" in module scope, but the implementation (it seems) only enforces it in limited circumstances. –  Zack Aug 26 '10 at 2:44
    
@otz: The problem is, the module might add more exports between when you byte compile the importing function, and when you execute it, and the language semantics would require all the exports from the newer module to be visible. –  Zack Aug 26 '10 at 2:46
1  
Ok, on this computer I don't have 2.7 either, and I haven't been able to persuade 2.6 to issue anything but a warning. But the 3.1 interpreter raises a SyntaxError for the simple "def f(): from module import *" example. –  Zack Aug 26 '10 at 15:27
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At any lexical level, from amodule import * is a "seemed a good idea at the time" design decision that has proven a real disaster in real life, with the possible exception of handy exploration at the interactive interpreter prompt (even then, I'm not too hot on it -- import module as m forces only two extra characters to use qualified names instead [[just an m. prefix]], and qualified names are always sharper and more flexible than barenames, not to mention the great usefulness in exploratory interactive situations of having m available for help(m), reload(m), and the like!).

This bedraggled construct makes it very hard, for the poor person reading the code (often in a doomed attempt to help debug it) to understand where mysteriously-appearing names are coming from -- impossible, if the construct is used more than once on a lexical level; but even when used just once, it forces laborious re-reading of the whole module every time before one can convince oneself that, yep, that bedraggled barename must come from the module.

Plus, module authors usually don't go to the extreme trouble needed to "support" the horrid construct in question. If somewhere in your code you have, say, a use of sys.argv (and an import sys at the very top of your module, of course), how do you know that sys is the module it should be... or some completely different one (or a non-module) coming from the ... import *?! Multiply that by all the qualified names you're using, and misery is the only end result -- that, and mysterious bugs requiring long, laborious debugging (usually with the reluctant help of somebody who does "get" Python...!-).

Within a function, a way to add and override arbitrary local names would be even worse. As an elementary but crucial optimization, the Python compiler looks around the function's body for any assignment or other binding statements on each barename, and deems "local" those names it sees thus assigned (the others must be globals or built-ins). With an import * (just like with an exec somestring without explicit dicts to use as namespaces), suddenly it becomes a total mystery which names are local, which names are global -- so the poor compiler would have to resort to the slowest possible strategy for each name lookup, using a dict for local variables (instead of the compact "vector" it normally uses) and performing up to three dict look-ups for each barename referenced, over and over.

Go to any Python interactive prompt. Type import this. What do you see? The Zen of Python. What's the last and probably greatest bit of wisdom in that text...?

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

By forcing the use of barenames where qualified names are so vastly preferable, you're essentially doing the very opposite of this wise recommendation: instead of admiring the greatness and honkingtude of namespaces, and doing more of those, you're breaking down two perfectly good and ready-to-use namespaces (that of the module you're importing, and that of the lexical scope you're importing it in) to make a single, unholy, buggy, slow, rigid, unusable mess.

If I could go back and change one early design decision in Python (it's a hard choice, because the use of def and especially lambda for what Javascript so much more readably calls function is a close second;-), I would retroactively wipe out the import * idea from Guido's mind. No amount of alleged convenience for exploration at the interactive prompt can balance the amount of evil it's wrought...!-)

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+1 honkingtude :P –  Jeremy Brown Aug 26 '10 at 2:34
    
But, but! Practically speaking, it is soooo**100 useful. Assume you have a canonical, general-purpose utility library, e.g., 'aima/utils.py' by Peter Norvig. I do not want to append 'm.' dozens of times in all interactive sessions and in any script I'm writing extemporaneously to refer to util functions in the library. I'm saying: if you are sure nothing will and would conflict with the local namespace by import * and if you are fully aware of all the modules imported, why eliminate the convenience? Of course, it should be discouraged in a project of more than one engineers. –  OTZ Aug 26 '10 at 2:41
4  
"why eliminate the convenience?" -- it's known as an "attractive nuisance" in legal circles: an alleged "convenience" that lures people to their undoing (and, in this case, runs exactly contrary to key Python principles, as I showed). Python is normally pretty good at that, but ... import * is an unfortunate exception. Just look at all of its occurrences on SO, for example, and you'll start seeing what a breeding ground for bugs, difficulties and perplexities it is. You want conciseness at all costs? Then Python is not for you -- power, clarity, elegance, yes, extreme conciseness, no. –  Alex Martelli Aug 26 '10 at 4:26
    
In my own code I tend to use "from X import A, B, C" a lot, which I think is a good tradeoff between convenience and namespace pollution. I hardly ever put imports inside functions, though. –  Zack Aug 27 '10 at 23:42
    
@Zack, I guess we disagree (a lot;-) on namespace pollution: while not as bad (by a long shot) as ... import *, I far prefer to always import a module (never a package, never a class or function from within a module) -- Google's style guide for Python agrees, by the way, and it makes "navigation" through a shared codebase of millions of lines of code incredibly easier (on yourself, and on tools like ctags that in turn help you much better that way;-). –  Alex Martelli Aug 28 '10 at 3:14
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The release notes for Python 2.1 seem to explain why this limitation exists:

One side effect of the change is that the from module import * and exec statements have been made illegal inside a function scope under certain conditions. The Python reference manual has said all along that from module import * is only legal at the top level of a module, but the CPython interpreter has never enforced this before. As part of the implementation of nested scopes, the compiler which turns Python source into bytecodes has to generate different code to access variables in a containing scope. from module import * and exec make it impossible for the compiler to figure this out, because they add names to the local namespace that are unknowable at compile time. Therefore, if a function contains function definitions or lambda expressions with free variables, the compiler will flag this by raising a SyntaxError exception.

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OK. So wouldn't import * be made possible if the byte compiler runs the <module> in from <module> import * at compile time so it knows all variables and functions contained in the module? Why wouldn't it do it? –  OTZ Aug 26 '10 at 2:11
    
For one thing, the <module> may not exist when the code containing the import statement is compiled. Or the set of variables to be imported may change between "compile time" and "run time". –  David Z Aug 26 '10 at 2:33
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It's not prohibited, because...

... it's handy for quick scripts and shell exploring.

...but you should not keep it in any serious code

  1. it can lead in importing names you don't know about and erase local names
  2. you can't know what's in use in your code, it's hard to know a script dependencies
  3. code completions won't work correctly anymore
  4. IDE convenient checks like "this var has not been declared" can't work anymore
  5. it make easier to create circular imports
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It's not prohibited at all. It works fine, but you get a warning because it's generally a bad idea (for reasons others have gone into). You can, if you like, suppress the warning; the warnings module is what you want for that.

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others have given in-depth answers, I'll give a short overview answer of my understanding.. when using from you are making it so you can directly call any function in that module you imported without doing modulename.functioname (you can just call "functionname") this creates problems if you have 2 functions of the same name in different modules and also can create confusion when dealing with a lot of functions as you don't know what object/module it belongs to (from point of view of someone looking over already written code that isn't familiar with it)

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