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In case when static polymorphism is used, especially in templates (e.g. with policy/strategy pattern), it may be required to call base function member, but you don't know was instantiated class actually derived from this base or not.

This easily can be solved with old good C++ ellipsis overload trick:

#include <iostream>

template <class I>
struct if_derived_from
{
    template <void (I::*f)()>
    static void call(I& x) {  (x.*f)(); }

    static void call(...) { }
};

struct A    { void reset() { std::cout << "reset A" << std::endl; } };
struct B    { void reset() { std::cout << "reset B" << std::endl; } };
struct C    { void reset() { std::cout << "reset C" << std::endl; } };
struct E: C { void reset() { std::cout << "reset E" << std::endl; } };
struct D: E {};

struct X: A, D {};

int main()
{
    X x;
    if_derived_from<A>::call<&A::reset>(x);
    if_derived_from<B>::call<&B::reset>(x);
    if_derived_from<C>::call<&C::reset>(x);
    if_derived_from<E>::call<&E::reset>(x);
    return 0;
}

The question is:

  • Is there any better simple way (e.g. SFINAE doesn't look so) to achieve same result in C++11/C++14?
  • Would empty call of ellipsis parameter function be elided by optimizing compiler? Hope such case is not special against any "normal" function.
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

One option is to introduce two overloads of different priorities and to equip the preferred one with an expression SFINAE.

#include <utility>

template <typename T, typename... Args, typename C, typename R, typename... Params>
auto call_impl(int, R(C::*f)(Args...), T&& t, Params&&... params)
    -> decltype((std::forward<T>(t).*f)(std::forward<Params>(params)...))
{
    return (std::forward<T>(t).*f)(std::forward<Params>(params)...);
}

template <typename T, typename... Args, typename C, typename R, typename... Params>
void call_impl(char, R(C::*)(Args...), T&&, Params&&...)
{
}

template <typename T, typename... Args, typename C, typename R, typename... Params>
auto call(R(C::*f)(Args...), T&& t, Params&&... params)
    -> decltype(call_impl(0, f, std::forward<T>(t), std::forward<Params>(params)...))
{
    return call_impl(0, f, std::forward<T>(t), std::forward<Params>(params)...);
}

Test:

int main()
{
    X x;
    call(&B::reset, x);
}

DEMO

The upper function will be selected first by overload resolution (due to an exact match of 0 against int), and possibly excluded from the set of viable candidates if (t.*f)(params...) is not valid. In the latter case, the call to call_impl falls back to the second overload, which is a no-op.


Given that &A::reset may fail for multiple reasons, and you may not necessarily want to explicitly specify the function's signature, and, on top of that, you want the call to fail if the member function exists, but it does not match function call arguments, then you can exploit generic lambdas:

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename B, typename T, typename F
        , std::enable_if_t<std::is_base_of<B, std::decay_t<T>>{}, int> = 0>
auto call(T&& t, F&& f)
    -> decltype(std::forward<F>(f)(std::forward<T>(t)))
{
    return std::forward<F>(f)(std::forward<T>(t));
}

template <typename B, typename T, typename F
        , std::enable_if_t<!std::is_base_of<B, std::decay_t<T>>{}, int> = 0>
void call(T&& t, F&& f)
{
}

Test:

int main()
{
    X x;
    call<A>(x, [&](auto&& p) { return p.A::reset(); });
    call<B>(x, [&](auto&& p) { return p.B::reset(); });
}

DEMO 2

share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick with 0 exact/implicit match, thanks! The only gotcha with this solution is that it wouldn't fail to compile in case when X is derived from A and A has reset() function member but with different signature, e.g. A::reset(int). In this case it would just silently omit the A::reset() call which can be undesirable. – Rost Mar 1 at 9:20
    
@Rost then you'd call it like call(&A::reset, x, 42);, but you want a compile error for call(&A::reset, x); ? – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 1 at 9:21
    
Piotr, yes, that is desirable. – Rost Mar 1 at 9:26
    
@Rost like here ? – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 1 at 9:39
    
Piotr, yes, this does the trick, but unfortunately simplicity escaped... Anyway, thanks! – Rost Mar 1 at 10:10

what about something like:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

struct A    { void reset() { std::cout << "reset A" << std::endl; } };
struct B    { void reset() { std::cout << "reset B" << std::endl; } };

struct X :public A{};

template <typename T, typename R, typename BT>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<BT, T>::value, R>::type
call_if_possible(T & obj, R(BT::*mf)())
{
    return (obj.*mf)();
}

template <typename T, typename R, typename BT>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_base_of<BT, T>::value, R>::type
call_if_possible(T & obj, R(BT::*mf)()) { }

int main()
{
    X x;

    call_if_possible(x, &A::reset);
    call_if_possible(x, &B::reset);
}

ideone

edit

maybe more readable way:

template <typename T, typename R, typename BT>
R call_if_possible_impl(T & obj, R(BT::*mf)(), std::false_type){}

template <typename T, typename R, typename BT>
R call_if_possible_impl(T & obj, R(BT::*mf)(), std::true_type)
{
    return (obj.*mf)();
}

template <typename T, typename R, typename BT>
R call_if_possible(T & obj, R(BT::*mf)())
{
    return call_if_possible_impl(obj, mf, typename std::is_base_of<BT, T>::type());
}

ideone

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, SFINAE works, but looks too ugly :-( – Rost Mar 1 at 8:55
    
it could be more readable using std::void_t (I will try to write that) ... I'm not sure how to get rid the redundant enable_if in 2nd specialization – relaxxx Mar 1 at 9:01
2  
@IsmaelMiguel that's because it's not C or C# ;) – relaxxx Mar 1 at 10:43
1  
@IsmaelMiguel it "is" stackoverflow.com/questions/4326045/… – relaxxx Mar 1 at 11:11
1  
I used member function instead of a lambda to answer your question as closely as possible ;) – relaxxx Mar 1 at 14:26

Basing on previously provided answers by @PiotrSkotnicki and @relaxxx I would like to combine the most simple and readable solution, without SFINAE and other blood-from-the-eyes things. It's just for reference, will not be accepted anyway:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <class Base, class Derived>
using check_base = typename std::is_base_of<Base, Derived>::type;

template <class Base, class Derived, typename Func>
void call(Derived& d, Func&& f)
{
    call<Base>(d, std::forward<Func>(f), check_base<Base, Derived>());
}

template <class Base, typename Func>
void call(Base& b, Func&& f, std::true_type)
{
    f(b);
}

template <class Base, class Derived, typename Func>
void call(Derived&, Func&&, std::false_type)
{
}

struct A    { void reset(int i) { std::cout << "reset A: " << i << std::endl;} };
struct B    { void reset()      { std::cout << "reset B" << std::endl;} };
struct C    { void reset()      { std::cout << "reset C" << std::endl;} };
struct E: C { void reset()      { std::cout << "reset E" << std::endl;} };

struct D: A, E {};

int main()
{
    D d;
    int i = 42;
    call<A>(d, [&](auto& p) { p.reset(i); } );
    call<B>(d, [](auto& p)  { p.reset(); } );
    call<C>(d, [](auto& p)  { p.reset(); } );
    call<E>(d, [](auto& p)  { p.reset(); } );
}

Live at: http://cpp.sh/5tqa

share|improve this answer
3  
Note that there's a difference between static_cast<Base&>(d).reset() and d.Base::reset(), the former involves late binding, the latter does not – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 1 at 13:26
    
@PiotrSkotnicki, yes, I understand, but it's not intended to be used with virtual functions. It's about static polymorphism only. – Rost Mar 1 at 13:33

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