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In Android programming, what exactly is a Context class and what is it used for? I read about it on the developer site, but I am unable to understand it clearly.

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5  
Related to this question –  Christopher Perry Jan 25 '13 at 6:41
    
@user1773784 "Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist. " –  Marian Paździoch Jun 17 at 10:14
    
By example Context : grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/ext/… –  Abdellah Sep 3 at 15:02
    

20 Answers 20

up vote 415 down vote accepted

Putting it simply:

As the name suggests, its the context of current state of the application/object. It lets newly created objects understand what has been going on. Typically you call it to get information regarding another part of your program (activity, package/application)

You can get the context by invoking getApplicationContext(), getContext(), getBaseContext() or this (when in the activity class).

Typical uses of context:

  • Creating New objects: Creating new views, adapters, listeners:

    TextView tv = new TextView(getContext());
    ListAdapter adapter = new SimpleCursorAdapter(getApplicationContext(), ...);
    
  • Accessing Standard Common Resources: Services like LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE, SharedPreferences:

    context.getSystemService(LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE)   
    getApplicationContext().getSharedPreferences(*name*, *mode*);
    
  • Accessing Components Implicitly: Regarding content providers, broadcasts, intent

    getApplicationContext().getContentResolver().query(uri, ...);
    
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In your example context.getSystemService(LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE), where and how is context defined? –  Dennis Dec 4 '12 at 21:47
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i think context there should be Context (the context class) –  ibaguio Dec 30 '12 at 16:38

Definition of Context::

  • Context represents environment data
  • It provides access to things such as databases

Simpler terms ::

  • Consider Person-X is the CEO of a start-up software company

  • There is a lead architect present in the company, this lead architect does all the work in the company which involves such as database, UI etc

  • Now the CEO Hires a new Developer

  • It is the Architect who tells the responsibility of the new hired person based on the skills of the new person that whether he will work on Database or UI etc

Simpler terms ::

  • Its like access of android-activity to app's resource

  • Its similar to a when you visit a hotel, you want breakfast, lunch & dinner in suitable timings right ?

  • There are many other things you like during the time of stay How you get these things?

  • You ask the room-service person to brring the things for you

  • Here room-service person is the context considering you are the single activity & hotel to be your app finally the breakfast, lunch & dinner to be the resources


Things that involve context are:

  1. Loading a resource.
  2. Launching a new activity.
  3. Creating views.
  4. obtaining system service.

Context is the base class for Activity, Service, Application .... etc

Another way to describe is, consider context as remote of a TV & channel's in the television are resources, services, using intents etc - - - Here remote acts as an access to get access to all the different resources into foreground.

  • So, Remote has access to channels such as resources, services, using intents etc ....
  • Likewise ..... Whoever has access to remote naturally has access to all the things such as resources, services, using intents etc

Different invoking methods by which you can get context

  • getApplicationContext()
  • getContext()
  • getBaseContext()
  • or this (when in the activity class)

Example:

TextView TV=new TextView(this);

this -> refers to the context of current activity

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This is a great way to introduce the idea of Context. Absolutely loved the examples. –  ChallengeAccepted Dec 26 '13 at 5:37
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This is the best example of the entire list of answers. +1 –  Subby Jan 22 at 11:13
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+1 for your company example –  Aaron Aug 18 at 17:41

A Context is a handle to the system; it provides services like resolving resources, obtaining access to databases and preferences, and so on. An android app has activities. It's like a handle to the environment your application is currently running in. The activity object inherits the Context object.

For more information look here.

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The link's content seems to have changed. Try Section "5.8. Context". But not much info there. –  avenmore Sep 8 '12 at 8:59
    
It has been 2 years since I wrote this answer. It has moved to section 5.4. Have updated my answer to reflect.. –  giulio Nov 30 '12 at 0:47
    
I think it is now 7.4. I would edit the answer if there wasn't a character minimum. –  ecbrodie May 14 '13 at 5:42
    
As new editions for Android come out, new features etc, Google will shuffle the doco around. Thanks for the update. –  giulio May 15 '13 at 2:15

ANDROID AND CONTEXT If you look through the various Android APIs, you’ll notice that many of them take an android.content.Context object as a parameter. You’ll also see that an Activity or a Service is usually used as a Context. This works because both of these classes extend from Context.

What’s Context exactly? Per the Android reference documentation, it’s an entity that represents various environment data. It provides access to local files, databases, class loaders associated to the environment, services including system-level services, and more. Throughout this book, and in your day-to- day coding with Android, you’ll see the Context passed around frequently. From: "Android in Practice" book.

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As long as your going to be thinking anyway, think big.

Activity diagram

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Can you please explain the graph or share some resource explaining the same. –  Prateek Oct 10 '13 at 10:04
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Question was already answered. The idea of following graph is to show that Context class is start point of big hierarchy structure which lead to Activity class. –  Dmytro Danylyk Oct 10 '13 at 13:14
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I would agree with @Prateek , while I can possibly infer some things from the graph, without any reference or further explanation, this graph only helps those who already clearly understand what a Context is. –  Mike Williamson Dec 6 '13 at 20:26

An Android Context is an "interface" that allows access to application specific resources and class and information about application environment.

If your android app was a web app, your context would be something similar to ServletContext ( I am not making an exact comparison here)

Your activities and services also extend Context to they inherit all those methods to access the environment information in which the app is running.

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AS per Android 4.1 Context is an abstract class, which provide various method to access the application environment. –  Rakesh Sep 10 '12 at 15:43
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As of API Level 1 Context is an abstract class not as of 4.1 –  Sankar V Oct 23 '13 at 13:05
    
It's an abstract class... –  Luis Alberto Mar 2 at 15:11
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People, when I quote "interface" I don't mean a java interface, but interface in a general sense. –  naikus Mar 3 at 5:05
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Obviously, some novices just don't understand what an "interface" is. They just think it as a java interface. For their reference, I've added a link. Please think before you downvote –  naikus Mar 3 at 5:12

Think of it as the VM that has siloed the process the app or service is running in. The siloed environment has access to a bunch of underlying system information and certain permitted resources. You need that context to get at those services.

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context is a reference to current object as this.also context allows access to information about application environment

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simply put nice ! –  Duraiamuthan.H May 31 at 15:20

The class android.content.Context provides the connection to the Android system and the resources of the project. It is the interface to global information about the application environment.

The Context also provides access to Android Services, e.g. the Location Service.

Activities and Services extend the Context class.

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This article has detailed explanation of what Context is really in android. Worth a read if you are trying to understand context in android.

http://levinotik.com/demystifying-context-in-android/

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Just to push you in 1000+ category –  Aexyn Sep 16 '13 at 11:15
    
Ha Ha Ha !!! Thx ... !!! –  Sourab Sharma Sep 16 '13 at 11:17
    
your posted link is dead, here is live one –  Alexander Malakhov Sep 30 at 8:28
    
Thanks Alexander. I have updated the link in my answer too. –  Sourab Sharma Oct 1 at 7:20

Context is basically for resource access and getting the environment details of the application(for application context) or activity (for activity context) or any other...

In order to avoid memory leak you should use application context for every components that needs a context object.... for more click here

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Interface to global information about an application environment. This is an abstract class whose implementation is provided by the Android system. It allows access to application-specific resources and classes, as well as up-calls for application-level operations such as launching activities, broadcasting and receiving intents, etc.

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This is one good and recent article about Context in Android. http://www.doubleencore.com/2013/06/context/

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Just putting it out there for newbies;

So First understand Word Context :

In english-lib. it means:

"The circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood and assessed."

"The parts of something written or spoken that immediately precede and follow a word or passage and clarify its meaning."

Now take the same understanding to programming world:

context of current state of the application/object. It lets newly created objects understand what has been going on. Typically you call it to get information regarding another part of your program (activity, package/application)

You can get the context by invoking getApplicationContext(), getContext(), getBaseContext() or this (when in the activity class).

To Get Context Anywhere in application use following code:

Create new class AppContext inside your android application

public class AppContext extends Application {

    private static Context context;

    public void onCreate(){
        super.onCreate();
        AppContext.context = getApplicationContext();
    }

    public static Context getAppContext() {
        return AppContext.context;
    }
}

Now any time you want application context in non-activity class, call this method and you have application context.

Hope this help ;)

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Context is context of current state of the application/object.Its an entity that represents various environment data . Context helps the current activity to interact with out side android environment like local files, databases, class loaders associated to the environment, services including system-level services, and more.

A Context is a handle to the system . It provides services like resolving resources, obtaining access to databases and preferences, and so on. An android app has activities. It’s like a handle to the environment your application is currently running in. The activity object inherits the Context object.

Different invoking methods by which you can get context 1. getApplicationContext(), 2. getContext(), 3. getBaseContext() 4. or this (when in the activity class).

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Instances of the the class android.content.Context provide the connection to the Android system which executes the application. For example, you can check the size of the current device display via the Context.

It also gives access to the resources of the project. It is the interface to global information about the application environment.

The Context class also provides access to Android services, e.g., the alarm manager to trigger time based events.

Activities and services extend the Context class. Therefore they can be directly used to access the Context.

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Context is Instances of the the class android.content.Context provide the connection to the Android system which executes the application. For example, you can check the size of the current device display via the Context.

It also gives access to the resources of the project. It is the interface to global information about the application environment.

The Context class also provides access to Android services, e.g., the alarm manager to trigger time based events.

Activities and services extend the Context class. Therefore they can be directly used to access the Context.

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Context in Android is an interface to global information about an application environment. This is an abstract class whose implementation is provided by the Android system. It allows access to application-specific resources and classes, as well as up-calls for application-level operations such as launching activities, broadcasting and receiving intents, etc.

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I hope you didn't just copy and paste that from a Google search. Being somewhat optimistic, we'll have the base assumption that the OP already tried googling a definition but came here to get a more cohesive and detailed description of a Context with hopefully some examples provided. And not a google-found text book definition. –  Subby Jan 22 at 11:16
    
@Subby Amusingly, he did: developer.android.com/reference/android/content/Context.html –  Poldie Feb 1 at 14:52
    
@Poldie From Google docs as well... Oh dear oh dear. –  Subby Feb 3 at 11:12

A Context is what most of us would call Application. It's made by the Android system and is able to do only what an application is able to. In Tomcat, a Context is also what I would call an application.

Obviously, some will say that it doesn't fit because of this or that, but saying that a Context is your current application will help you to understand what you are putting in method parameters.

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Context objects are so common, and get passed around so frequently, it can be easy to create a situation you didn’t intend. i.e. Loading resources, launching a new Activity, obtaining a system service, getting internal file paths, and creating views all require a Context (and that’s not even getting started on the full list!) to accomplish the task.

Context Types

Not all Context instances are created equal. Depending on the Android application component, the Context you have access to varies slightly: Application – is a singleton instance running in your application process. It can be accessed via methods like getApplication() from an Activity or Service, and getApplicationContext() from any other object that inherits from Context. Regardless of where or how it is accessed, you will always receive the same instance from within your process.

Activity/Service

inherit from ContextWrapper which implements the same API, but proxies all of its method calls to a hidden internal Context instance, also known as its base context. Whenever the framework creates a new Activity or Service instance, it also creates a new ContextImpl instance to do all of the heavy lifting that either component will wrap. Each Activity or Service, and their corresponding base context, are unique per-instance.

BroadcastReceiver

BroadcastReceiver is not a Context in and of itself, but the framework passes a Context to it in onReceive() each time a new broadcast event comes in. This instance is a ReceiverRestrictedContext with two main functions disabled; calling registerReceiver() and bindService(). These two functions are not allowed from within an existing BroadcastReceiver.onReceive(). Each time a receiver processes a broadcast, the Context handed to it is a new instance.

ContentProvider

ContentProvider is also not a Context but is given one when created that can be accessed via getContext(). If the ContentProvider is running local to the caller (i.e. same application process), then this will actually return the same Application singleton. However, if the two are in separate processes, this will be a newly created instance representing the package the provider is running in.

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