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I have a Python class C which should have two pseudo-dicts a and b. The term pseudo-dicts means that the dictionaries don't actually exist and that they are “recomputed” each time a key is accessed.

In pseudocode this would look like this:

class C:
    def a.__getitem__(self, key):
        return 'a'
    def b.__getitem__(self, key):
        return 'b'

>>> c = C()
>>> c.a['foo']
'a'
>>> c.b['bar']
'b'

I could implement a class for a and b, but since both have just a few short methods, I wonder whether there is a more elegant and compact way to do this.

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4  
Why is this community wiki? –  gnibbler Aug 26 '10 at 7:05
    
The question was not precisely articulated and I wasn't sure if there is an answer at all, so I thought it's not worth any reputation. Moreover, this makes it possible for others (at best native speakers) to clarify my question more easily. –  user141335 Aug 26 '10 at 11:40
    
A bit of curiosity. Why do you need this at all? What is the scenario? –  Muhammad Alkarouri Aug 26 '10 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just define your own class?

class PseudoDict(object):
    def __init__(self, c):
        self.c = c

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return self.c.somethingmagical()

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = PseudoDict(self)
        self.b = PseudoDict(self)

c = C()
print c.a['foo']
print c.b['bar']

I'm not sure where the values for these 'pseudo-dicts' are coming from, so you'll have to update the __getitem__ method.

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1  
The values from the pseudo-dicts are coming from C, so this approach would PseudoDict require to have access to “private” variables of C. –  user141335 Aug 26 '10 at 6:35
1  
@ott, I'm still not sure where the values are coming from, but I updated the example. –  carl Aug 26 '10 at 6:37
1  
@ott, you could also pass the function to be used to retrieve the value from C to the PseudoDict constructor, so that a and b are actually capable of providing different values. –  Daniel Beck Aug 26 '10 at 8:06
2  
If PseudoDict is using "private" variables of C (ie tightly coupled) it's probably more appropriate to define PseudoDict inside the scope of C to reflect the tight coupling –  gnibbler Aug 26 '10 at 8:24
1  
You might want to use a weak reference to C, to avoid reference cycles. –  jchl Aug 26 '10 at 8:54

Like this?

from collections import defaultdict
class C:
    a = defaultdict(lambda:'a')
    b = defaultdict(lambda:'b')

c=C()
print c.a['foo']
print c.b['bar']

Or maybe like this for real calculation functions?

from collections import defaultdict

class C:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = defaultdict(self.geta)
        self.b = defaultdict(self.getb)
    def geta(self):
        return 'a'
    def getb(self):
        return 'b'

c=C()
print c.a['foo']
print c.b['bar']
share|improve this answer
    
They aren't supposed to return constants. Furthermore they should support multiple keys. –  user141335 Aug 29 '10 at 9:43
    
Could you give real example of the use and why the pseudodict is needed? –  Tony Veijalainen Aug 29 '10 at 10:18

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