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I am making my own installer and it's almost complete. The only thing lacking is the sound when installation is complete. Is that a windows API call or I will need to find that audio file and play that from the source code?

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I am sure you do, but as there are still too many products that don't: please, please, please respect the sound settings of the machine and user on/for which you are running your installer. There is little I abhor more in an (install)app than making unwanted sounds and no means of turning them off. If you go the route of a custom sound: please respect the setting of a system sound for a similar event. –  Marjan Venema Aug 26 '10 at 7:43
5  
I've never heard a Windows installer play a sound when it finished. Since when does that happen? Mac installers do it all the time, but Windows installers should not endeavor to pretend to be Mac installers, and vice versa. Besides, Rajeem, why are you making your own installer when there are already so many installer tools out there already that have already solved a lot of common installer tasks that you probably haven't even thought of yet? –  Rob Kennedy Aug 26 '10 at 7:52
    
Actually, it's a plugin installer and it will be used to configure the INI and Registry that's why I chose to make my own installer. There are so many installers that do play sound. Try executing this sound in Delphi - MessageBeep(MB_ICONINFORMATION). I think this is the most commonly used sound to notify the user that the installation is completed. –  rajeemcariazo Aug 26 '10 at 8:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the MessageBeep function.

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Thanks, I've used MessageBeep(MB_ICONINFORMATION); –  rajeemcariazo Aug 26 '10 at 7:45

This Small Collection of Functions Will Load, Playback, Stop, and Dump (Free Memory) for any MCI Supported Sound Files. [*.wav, *.mp3, *.wma, etc...]

uses MMSystem;

function LoadMediaFile(absoluteFile,clipName: String): Integer;
var
  pc2: PChar;
  pc3: String;
    begin
      pc3 := '"'+absoluteFile+'"';
      pc2 := PChar('Open ' + pc3 + ' Alias '+ clipName);
      Result := mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0);
    end;

function StartMediaFile(clipName: String) : Integer;
var
  pc2: PChar;
    begin
      pc2 := PChar('Play ' + clipName + ' From ' + '0');
      Result := mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0);
    end;

function StopMediaFile(clipName: String): Integer;
var
  pc2: PChar;
  i: Integer;
    begin
      pc2 := PChar('Stop ' + clipName + ' wait');
      i := 0;
      while (mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0)<>0) and (i < 250) do
        begin
          Result := mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0); i := i + 1;
        end;
    end;

function DumpMediaFile(clipName: String): Integer;
var
  pc2,pc3: PChar;
  i: Integer;
    begin
      pc2 := PChar('Stop ' + clipName + ' wait');
      pc3 := PChar('Close ' + clipName + ' Wait');
      i := 0;
      while (mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0)<>0) and (i < 250) do
        begin
          mciSendString(pc2, PChar(0), 0, 0); i := i + 1;
        end;
      i := 0;
      while (mciSendString(pc3, PChar(0), 0, 0)<>0) and (i < 250) do
        begin
          Result := mciSendString(pc3, PChar(0), 0, 0); i := i + 1;
        end;
    end;

Use them like this:

ResultInteger1 := LoadMediaFile('X:\Path\To\File.WAV', 'ClipName');
ResultInteger2 := StartMediaFile('ClipName');
Sleep(3000);
ResultInteger3 := StopMediaFile('ClipName');
ResultInteger4 := DumpMediaFile('ClipName');

Will Play 3 Seconds of The X:\Path\To\File.WAV file.

You can use:

if ResultInteger2 <> 0 then ShowMessage('ClipName did not play.');
//or
if ResultInteger2 = 0 then ShowMessage('ClipName did play.');
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You can easily play the default system sounds by using:

System.Media.SystemSounds.Beep.Play();
System.Media.SystemSounds.Asterisk.Play();
System.Media.SystemSounds.Exclamation.Play();
System.Media.SystemSounds.Hand.Play();
System.Media.SystemSounds.Question.Play();
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1  
Looks like a .Net code, I am actually using Native Delphi, sorry for not tagging Delphi –  rajeemcariazo Aug 26 '10 at 7:12
    
But you did tag Win32 and WinAPI, thus indicating that you are working with the native Windows API, and not .NET. –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 26 '10 at 7:23
1  
So, as Andreas answered, use the MessageBeep (user32.dll). If you want the different sound types use: Asterisk = 0x40, Beep = 0, Exclamation = 0X30, Hand = 0x10, Question = 0x20. –  Nissim Aug 26 '10 at 7:39
2  
No, @Nissim, do as the documentation says and use Asterisk = MB_ICONASTERISK, Beep = MB_OK, Exclamation = MB_ICONWARNING, Hand = MB_ICONHAND, and Question = MB_ICONQUESTION. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 26 '10 at 7:50
1  
@Rob: Documentation are for wussies (: –  Nissim Aug 26 '10 at 8:27

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