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How do I call the parent function from a derived class using C++? For example, I have a class called parent, and a class called child which is derived from parent. Within each class there is a print function. In the definition of the child's print function I would like to make a call to the parents print function. How would I go about doing this?

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All the above solutions are assuming that your print function is a static method. Is this the case? If the method is not static then the above solutions are not relevant. –  hhafez Dec 11 '08 at 10:51
3  
hhafez, you are mistaken the base::function() syntax looks like static method call syntax but it works for instance methods in this context. –  Motti Dec 13 '08 at 18:59
1  
I wouldn't use the MSVC __super since it's platform specific. Although your code may not run on any other platform, I'd use the other suggestions since they do it as the language intended. –  Teaser Oct 13 '10 at 23:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 224 down vote accepted

I'll take the risk of stating the obvious, you call the function, if it's defined in the base class it's automatically available in the derived class (unless it's private).

If there is a function with the same signature in the derived class you can disambiguate it by adding the base class's name followed by two colons base_class::foo(...). You should note that unlike Java and C#, C++ does not have a keyword for "the base class" (super or base) since C++ supports multiple inheritance which may lead to ambiguity.

class left {
public:
    void foo();
};

class right {
public:
    void foo();
};

class bottom : public left, public right {
public:
    void foo()
    {
        //base::foo();// ambiguous
        left::foo();
        right::foo();
    }
};

Incidentally, you can't derive directly from the same class twice since there will be no way to refer to one of the base classes over the other.

class bottom : public left, public left { // Illegal
};
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3  
+1 one for the incidentally comment :) –  Mihai Timar Sep 14 '12 at 14:33
2  
Why would you like to inherit from the same class twice ? –  bluesm Oct 5 '13 at 18:39
8  
@bluesm: in classic OOP it makes no much sense, but in generic programming template<class A, class B> class C: public A, public B {}; can come to two types being the same for reasons depending on how your code is used (that makes A and B to be the same), may be two or three abstraction layer way from someone not aware of what you did. –  Emilio Garavaglia Nov 18 '13 at 18:37

Do something like this:

void child::print(int x)
{
    parent::print(x);
}
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If your base class is called Base, and your function is called FooBar() you can call it directly using Base::FooBar()

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In MSVC there is a Microsoft specific keyword for that: __super


MSDN: Allows you to explicitly state that you are calling a base-class implementation for a function that you are overriding.

// deriv_super.cpp
// compile with: /c
struct B1 {
   void mf(int) {}
};

struct B2 {
   void mf(short) {}

   void mf(char) {}
};

struct D : B1, B2 {
   void mf(short) {
      __super::mf(1);   // Calls B1::mf(int)
      __super::mf('s');   // Calls B2::mf(char)
   }
};


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1  
This works if the functions are virtual too. Nice tip. –  Danny Parker Jan 15 '10 at 11:29
3  
Eh, I'd prefer typdefing the parent as something like super. –  Thomas Eding Nov 1 '11 at 19:06
13  
I won't try to justify usage of __super; I mentioned it here as an alternative suggestion. Developers should know their compiler and understand pros and cons of its capabilities. –  Andrey Jan 30 '12 at 1:56
    
I'd rather discourage anyone from using it, as it severely hinders portability of the code. –  Erbureth Mar 13 at 13:42
struct a{
 int x;

 struct son{
  a* _parent;
  void test(){
   _parent->x=1; //success
  }
 }_son;

 }_a;

int main(){
 _a._son._parent=&_a;
 _a._son.test();
}

Reference example.

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