Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What happens when I do the following?

(define ((func x) y)
    (if (zero? y)
        ((func x) 1)
        12))

I understand that I can do this:

(define curried (func 5))

And now I can use curried. What I'm curious about is in the definition of the function. Does the line

((func x) 1)

create a new lambda with x as the argument, and then invoke it on 1? Or is it smarter than that and it just re-uses the existing one. (For example, if I do (curried 0), the ((func x) 1) line would be equivalent to (curried 1) - does PLAI Scheme do this?)

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In the Scheme standard it is specified that

(define (f x) 42) is short for (define f (lambda (x) 42)) .

The natural (non-standard) generalization implies:

(define ((f x) y) (list x y)) is short for (define (f x) (lambda (y) (list x y)))
                which is short for (define f (lambda (x) (lambda (y) (list x y))))

To test it, let's try the example in DrScheme

Welcome to DrScheme, version 4.1.3.3-svn5dec2008 [3m]. Language: Module; memory limit: 384 megabytes.

(define ((f x) y) (list x y)) (f 1)

((f 1) 2) (1 2)

If we name the temporary value, it might be easier to see what happens:

(define h (f 1)) (h 2) (1 2) (h 3) (1 3)

Since "PLAI Scheme" is implemented in DrScheme, I believe it inherits this shortcut notation.

share|improve this answer
    
gotcha. to answer my question now - this expansion will happen even in the function 'f', right? –  Claudiu Dec 11 '08 at 17:21
    
Which f are talking about now? –  soegaard Dec 12 '08 at 8:35

It's been too long since I worked with scheme, but you might find this article helpful. It describes the implementation of two macros, c-lambda and c-define which allow implicit curried definitions of lambda expressions.

share|improve this answer
1  
hmm, an interesting article, but this behavior i'm asking about is built-in to plai scheme, and i want to know how it is implemented - the article implements a different version of currying. –  Claudiu Dec 10 '08 at 20:35

soegaard's answer is correct - this is the traditional expansion. However, drscheme is smart!

The following code I've found to be equivalent in running time:

Original source:

(define ((substitute lv value) e)
  (cond [(LogicVar? e)
	 (type-case LogicVar e
	   [lv-any (id) (if (symbol=? id (lv-any-id lv))
			    value
			    e)]
	   [lv-cons (f r) 
		    (lv-cons ((substitute lv value) f)
			     ((substitute lv value) r))])]
	[(cons? e)
	 (cons ((substitute lv value) (car e))
	       ((substitute lv value) (cdr e)))]
	[else e]))

Attempt at optimization:

(define (substitute lv value)
  (local ([define inner
	    (lambda (e)
	      (cond [(LogicVar? e)
		     (type-case LogicVar e
		       [lv-any (id) (if (symbol=? id (lv-any-id lv))
					value
					e)]
		       [lv-cons (f r) 
				(lv-cons (inner f)
					 (inner r))])]
		    [(cons? e)
		     (cons (inner (car e))
			   (inner (cdr e)))]
		    [else e]))])
    inner))

Code which heavily uses this function (multiple times, not just once) runs at 1800 ms for both versions. More interestingly, this version (my visualization of what was happening):

(define (substitute lv value)
  (local ([define inner
	    (lambda (e)
	      (cond [(LogicVar? e)
		     (type-case LogicVar e
		       [lv-any (id) (if (symbol=? id (lv-any-id lv))
					value
					e)]
		       [lv-cons (f r) 
				(lv-cons ((substitute lv value) f)
					 ((substitute lv value) r))])]
		    [(cons? e)
		     (cons ((substitute lv value) (car e))
			   ((substitute lv value) (cdr e)))]
		    [else e]))])
    inner))

Runs at 2000 ms. So there is definitely a slow-down if the calls to substitute within substitute were each creating a lambda, but it appears this is not the case with the shortcut notation.

share|improve this answer
    
If you benchmark in DrScheme remember to turn debugging of (in the language menu, choose "Details") - or try the timings in MzScheme. –  soegaard Dec 12 '08 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.