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I found the following thread:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/777617/calculate-broadcast-address-from-ip-and-subnet-mask and there the link to http://lpccomp.bc.ca/netmask/netmask.c

Could someone please explain the following line, I don't understand:

for ( maskbits=32 ; (mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits))) == 0 ; maskbits-- )

especially mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits))

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

<< is the bitwise left shift operator; it shifts the bits of a value left by the given amount. Thus 1L<<(32-maskbits) shifts the value 1 to the left 32-maskbits times.

& is the bitwise AND operator.

So the loop expression mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits)) == 0 tests all the bits within the value of mask, from lower to higher. The loop will stop on the first (lowest) nonzero bit of mask, at which point maskbits will contain the number of bits above (and including) that bit.

E.g.

  • if mask == 0xFFFF mask == 0xFFFFFFFF (== binary 11111111111111111111111111111111), the loop will stop on the first iteration, and maskbits will be 32
  • if mask == 0x0001 mask == 0x00000001 (== binary 00000000000000000000000000000001), the loop will again stop on the first iteration, and maskbits will be 32
  • if mask == 0x1000 mask == 0x01000000 (== binary 00000001000000000000000000000000), the loop will stop on the 24th iteration, and maskbits will be 8
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question: I get the bitwise AND operation to check when to stop the bits counting, I don't get why using the left shifting with a long int. 1 was not enough? –  dierre Aug 26 '10 at 10:21
    
thanks for the explanation! –  mspoerr Aug 26 '10 at 10:21
1  
@dierre, to avoid integer overflow. On some platforms an int is only 16 bits long, where if you left shift any int value by more than 16, the result is undefined (can be 0). Declaring the value as long ensures it is at least 32 bits long. –  Péter Török Aug 26 '10 at 10:28
    
one more question: I am a bit confused about the "1L" statement. What is it exactly? –  mspoerr Aug 26 '10 at 10:32
1  
Shift of signed values is tricky and can lead to undefined behavior. In the example if long has width 32, for the value of maskbits being 1 the shift reads 1L << 31 which may be UB. So here the`1L` should be replaced at least with a 1UL to obtain an unsigned long value for the mask. Even better would be to use UINT32_C(1) for it. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 26 '10 at 11:40

Have a look at bitwise operators, specifically left shift.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#Shifts_in_C.2C_C.2B.2B_and_Java

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To see what's happening: run it.

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

char *binary (unsigned int v) {
static char binstr[33] ;
int i ;

binstr[32] = '\0' ;
for (i=0; i<32; i++) {
binstr[31-i] = v & 1 ? '1' : '0' ;
v = v / 2 ;
}

return binstr ;
}

int main(void){  

  unsigned long maskbits,mask;  

mask = 0x01000000;
cout << "MASK IS: " << binary(mask) << "\n";
cout << "32 is: " << binary(32) << "\n\n";
for ( maskbits=32 ; (mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits))) == 0 ; maskbits-- ) {
cout << "maskbits: " << binary(maskbits) << "\n";
cout << "\t(32-maskbits): " << binary((32-maskbits)) << "\n";
cout << "\t1L<<(32-maskbits): " << binary((1L<<(32-maskbits))) << "\n";
cout << "\t(mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits))): " << binary((mask & (1L<<(32-maskbits)))) << "\n\n";

}

cout << "\nFinal maskbits: " << maskbits;

return 0;
}

http://ideone.com/eB8Kp

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thank you for the great example! –  mspoerr Aug 26 '10 at 11:11

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