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I'm trying to write a basic DST converter. I have a segmented control with 3 choices, their titles (surprisingly) are Distance, Speed and Time. I have 2 input text fields and a calculate button, as well as 2 labels for each text field with the type of measurement required and it's units. Making a selection on the segmented control should update the view accordingly. The variables have all been declared as IBOutlets, @property, @synthesize, and the code sits in an IBAction method, which is connected to the segmented control. The following code does not work, am I missing something completely obvious? (NSLog shows the correct title)

NSString *choice;    
choice = [dstChoiceSegmentedControl titleForSegmentAtIndex: dstChoiceSegmentedControl.selectedSegmentIndex];
    NSLog(@"Choice |%@|", choice);
    if (choice == @"Distance") {
        firstLabel.text = @"Speed:";
        firstUnitsLabel.text = @"kts";
        secondLabel.text = @"Time:";
        secondUnitsLabel.text = @"hrs";
        answerUnitsLabel.text = @"nm";
    } else if (choice == @"Speed") {
        firstLabel.text = @"Distance:";
        firstUnitsLabel.text = @"nm";
        secondLabel.text = @"Time:";
        secondUnitsLabel.text = @"hrs";
        answerUnitsLabel.text = @"kts";
    } else if (choice == @"Time") {
        firstLabel.text = @"Distance:";
        firstUnitsLabel.text = @"nm";
        secondLabel.text = @"Speed:";
        secondUnitsLabel.text = @"kts";
        answerUnitsLabel.text = @"hrs";
    }

Thanks for your help (and I hope it's not some silly error that is staring me right in the face)!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You cannot compare strings this way. You need to do:

[choice isEqualToString:@"Distance"];

But if I were you, I'd check for the indicies instead.

edit: To explain it further: what you're doing with choice == @"Distance" is comparing a pointer with a string, which will not work. You need to call the string objects comparing method as shown above.

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Well, the string itself is also a pointer. –  Jacob Relkin Aug 26 '10 at 11:46
    
Thanks, that worked a treat. As I'm relatively new to programming, why is it better to check for the indicies (which I'm now doing) rather than whether the strings match? –  churchill614 Aug 26 '10 at 11:51
    
It takes up less ressources to compare integers then it takes to compare strings and thus may be a little bit faster. You propably wouldn't feel the difference, though. –  Toastor Aug 26 '10 at 11:57
    
Thanks for your help. And that's 2 new things I've learnt so far today! –  churchill614 Aug 26 '10 at 11:59

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