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The size and range of the integer value types in C++ are platform specific. Values found on most 32-bit systems can be found at Variables. Data Types. - C++ Documentation. How do you determine what the actual size and range are for your specific system?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 36 down vote accepted

C Style

limits.h contains the min and max values for ints as well as other data types which should be exactly what you need:

#include <limits.h> // C header
#include <climits> // C++ header

// Constant containing the minimum value of a signed integer (–2,147,483,648)
INT_MIN; 

// Constant containing the maximum value of a signed integer (+2,147,483,647)
INT_MAX;

For a complete list of constants and their common values check out: Wikipedia - limits.h


C++ Style

There is a template based C++ method as other commenters have mentioned using:

  #include <limits>

  std::numeric_limits

which looks like:

  std::numeric_limits<int>::max();

and it can even do craftier things like determine the number of digits possible or whether the data type is signed or not:

  // Number of digits for decimal (base 10)
  std::numeric_limits<char>::digits10;

  // Number of digits for binary
  std::numeric_limits<char>::digits;

  std::numeric_limits<unsigned int>::is_signed;
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1  
+1 for being wickedly fast. I had my answer ready but got distracted for a minute. :) –  Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 21:19
1  
I would find the route of using numeric_limits to be preferable. –  Jon Trauntvein Dec 10 '08 at 21:21
1  
beware when using ::digits. you will get the amount of bits (excluding the sign bit), that is the dual digits :). ::digits10 will give you the num of decimal digits. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 10 '08 at 21:53
2  
beware in win32 if you also include windows.h, max is defined as a macro and you will get strange compilation behavior. –  Doug T. Dec 10 '08 at 22:16
1  
@Doug T.: Use (std::numeric_limits<int>::max)() instead, or undefine max before this call. –  Jasper Bekkers Dec 10 '08 at 22:26

Take a look at std::numeric_limits

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That's interesting. I wasn't aware of it before. –  Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 21:29
    
both have their uses. macros from climits can be used in preprocessor tests and can be passed as template arguments. while numeric_limits offer some other fine bits of possibilities besides the range checking stuff. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 10 '08 at 21:31

Why not just be sure and use boost's numeric types?

ie:

boost::uint32_t
boost::int32_t

etc

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That's a good alternative. –  Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 21:29
1  
That's good, I'd say the only real problem is the dependency on the boost library. –  BobbyShaftoe Dec 10 '08 at 21:37

You can use the types defined in stdint.h (or cstdint, if you are using C++), which are part of the C99 standard. It defines types with such names as *int32_t*, *uint8_t*, *int64_t*, an so on, which are guaranteed to be portable and platform independent.

For more information: stdint.h

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Thanks. It's good to know a platform independent alternative. –  Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 21:41
    
Unfortunately, stdint.h and cstdint are not shipped with Microsoft Visual Studio (2008). The WikiPedia entry (provided above) suggests some alternatives. Here's a permalink: en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Stdint.h&oldid=280101290 –  nobar Apr 5 '09 at 4:38

Use the sizeof() operator in C++ to determine the size (in bytes) of a value type. The standard library header file limits.h contains the range limits for integer value types. You can run the following program to learn the size and range limits for integer types on your system.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    cout << "\nCharacter Types" << endl;
    cout << "Size of character type is " << sizeof(char) << " byte." << endl;
    cout << "Signed char min: " << SCHAR_MIN << endl;
    cout << "Signed char max: " << SCHAR_MAX << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned char min: 0" << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned char max: " << UCHAR_MAX << endl;

    cout << "\nShort Int Types" << endl;
    cout << "Size of short int type is " << sizeof(short) << " bytes." << endl;
    cout << "Signed short min: " << SHRT_MIN << endl;
    cout << "Signed short max: " << SHRT_MAX << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned short min: 0" << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned short max: " << USHRT_MAX << endl;

    cout << "\nInt Types" << endl;
    cout << "Size of int type is " << sizeof(int) << " bytes." << endl;
    cout << "Signed int min: " << INT_MIN << endl;
    cout << "Signed int max: " << INT_MAX << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned int min: 0" << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned int max: " << UINT_MAX << endl;

    cout << "\nLong Int Types" << endl;
    cout << "Size of long int type is " << sizeof(long) << " bytes." << endl;
    cout << "Signed long min: " << LONG_MIN << endl;
    cout << "Signed long max: " << LONG_MAX << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned long min: 0" << endl;
    cout << "Unsigned long max: " << ULONG_MAX << endl;

    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
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#include<stdio.h>  
#include<limits.h>   
void main()  
{  
     printf(" signed data types " );  
     printf(" int min : %d ", INT_MIN); // INT_MIN, INT_MAX, SCHAR_MIN, SCHAR_MAX ....etc  
     printf(" int max : %d  ",INT_MAX);// pre defined constants to get the values of datatypes       
     printf(" signed char min : %d ", SCHAR_MIN);  
     printf(" signed char max : %d ", SCHAR_MAX);  
// similarly for un_signed  
// use %u for control charter, and UINT_MAX, UCHAR_MAX, USHRT_MAX, ULONG_MAX.  
}
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You can get the range of any data type by applying the following formulla:

[-2 power (N-1)] to { [+2 power (N-1)] - 1 }

Where "N" is the width of data type, for example in JAVA the width of int is 32,hence N = 32.

Try this out you will get it.

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Bitwise operations can be used to find the number of bits and range of int in a platform. Here is a sample I wrote to test the range of int on my machine.

    #include <iostream>

    using namespace std;


    void print_int_range() {
        int i=1;

        int nOfBits=0;
        while (i != 0) {
            i = i << 1;
            nOfBits++;
        }

        cout << "int has " << nOfBits << " bits" << endl;

        cout << "mininum int: " << (1 << (nOfBits - 1)) << ", maximum int: " << ~(1 << (nOfBits - 1))  << endl;

    }

    void print_unsigned_int_range() {
        unsigned int i=1;

        int nOfBits=0;
        while (i != 0) {
            i = i << 1;
            nOfBits++;
        }

        cout << "unsigned int has " << nOfBits << " bits" << endl;

        cout << "mininum int: " << (0) << ", maximum int: " << (unsigned int) (~0) << endl;
    }


    int main() {
        print_int_range();

        print_unsigned_int_range();
    }

And here is my output:

int has 32 bits 
mininum int: -2147483648, maximum int: 2147483647 
unsigned int has 32 bits 
mininum int: 0, maximum int: 4294967295
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signed underflow is technically undefined behaviour. Your test is pure runtime behaviour. You can achieve the same results with std::numeric_limits –  stefan Nov 18 '13 at 9:43
    
@stefan Good to know. Thanks! –  Shaohong Li Nov 18 '13 at 9:52
    
B.T.W. @stefan, I'm not using any "underflow" here. I'm using my understanding two's-complement representation of integers on typical computer platforms. –  Shaohong Li Nov 19 '13 at 6:21
    
You're assuming a specific representation for the minimum: (1 << (nOfBits - 1)), that's the first not guaranteed thing. Second, for the maximum you substract 1 from the smallest number which underflows to the maximum number in most cases, but again, not guaranteed. –  stefan Nov 19 '13 at 6:28
    
@stephan, I was only assuming the platform is using two's complement representation of integers. So by (1 << (nOfBits - 1)) I'm marking the sign bit to be 1 and keeping all other bits zero to get the minimum negative integer. I agree that ((1 << (nOfBits - 1)) - 1) is not a good approach to get the maximum and a better one could be something like (~(1 << (nOfBits - 1))) i.e. using pure bitwise operations. It's fun to discuss with you. –  Shaohong Li Nov 19 '13 at 7:21
sizeof(int)
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That tells you how many bytes a type takes up in memory. What tells you the range? –  Bill the Lizard Dec 10 '08 at 21:44
    
0 to 2 ** (sizeof(int) * 8) - 1, for unsigned types anyway :-) –  Ferruccio Dec 10 '08 at 21:58
2  
Ferruccio. nono, let's stay portable: 0 to 2 ** (sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT) - 1 hehe –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 10 '08 at 21:59
2  
Even then, still not portable. The only integer types in which every bit of the storage representation is required to participate in the value representation are the three char types. It's perfectly valid to have a 9 bit char, but a 32 bit int. –  Steve Jessop Dec 11 '08 at 22:48

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