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I have a question regarding the following code:

abstract class a
{
    public static string x;
}



class b<c> where c : a
{
    public void f()
    {
        c.x=10;
    }
}

This code does not compile. I get an error at the statement c.x=10; . The problem makes it look as if the condition where c:a does not have any effect at all.Can someone please explain why this is an error? Is it not true that x is shared as a static member by all children of a? And is there a way to circumvent this problem?

What I am trying to achieve is this : i have a subclass of a, all of whose objects share a common property and this property has to be set through f() in the generic class b. Is it alright if i replace the statement in question with a.x=10? If not, how is a.x different from c.x (or h.x where h is the subclass of a)?

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I'm not really sure what you're trying to achieve. Can you expand? –  dtb Aug 26 '10 at 19:00
    
let me add in a little more detail to help get a better picture of the requirement : "a" represents an abstraction for a job; the fields in a job would be used to launch a process. any given subclass of "a" represents a particular type of job. let "k" be one such subclass. all instances of "k" share one common attribute. this is true for all types of job. there is another class "b" that works on any kind of job (ie., "b" works using any subclass of "a"). I am trying to set the common attribute for a given type of job through "b". Is there a way to achieve this? –  Aadith Aug 26 '10 at 19:18
    
Aside from all the comments about staticicity, you're also trying to assign an int (10) to a string storage location (x). AFAIK, that's not going to fly either. –  Jesse C. Slicer Aug 26 '10 at 19:43
    
ah. my bad..that was a mistake I made while trying to abstract the concept. This problem is not present in the actual code where I am trying to solve the problem in question. –  Aadith Aug 27 '10 at 3:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Static members are not inherited, although it's confusingly possible to access a static member through a derived type. For example, in the following code

class P
{
    public static string X;
}

class Q : P { }

class R : P { }

you can access P.X through P.X or Q.X or R.X but it's still the same field:

P.X = "Hello";
Q.X = "World";
Console.WriteLine(R.X);  // prints "World"

As you've discovered, you can't do this with generic type parameters. But accessing X though the type parameter doesn't really make a lot of sense, because all you change is P.X which you write directly without the generic type parameter.


I'm not really sure what you're trying to achieve. If you have an abstract class A and want all instances of types that derive from A to have a certain property, you can define this:

abstract class A
{
    public abstract string X
    {
        get;
    }
}

class A1 : A
{
    public override string X
    {
        get { return "A1"; }
    }
}

class A2 : A
{
    public override string X
    {
        get { return "A2"; }
    }
}

If you want to associate a bit of information with a type (not instance), you can define a static field that is parameterized with a type using a generic class:

class Info<T>
{
    public static string X;
}

Info<A1>.X = "Hello";
Info<A2>.X = "World";

Console.WriteLine(Info<A1>.X);  // prints "Hello"
Console.WriteLine(Info<A2>.X);  // prints "World"

What about this?

abstract class Job
{
    public abstract string ExePath
    {
        get;
    }

    public void Execute(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Executing {0}", this.ExePath);
    }
}

abstract class Job<T> where T : Job<T>
{
    public override string ExePath
    {
        get { return JobInfo<T>.ExePath; }
    }
}

class ConcreteJob1 : Job<ConcreteJob1> { }

class ConcreteJob2 : Job<ConcreteJob1> { }

static class JobInfo<T> where T : Job<T>
{
    public static string ExePath;
}

static class JobInfoInitializer
{
    public static void InitializeExePaths()
    {
        JobInfo<ConcreteJob1>.ExePath = "calc.exe";
        JobInfo<ConcreteJob2>.ExePath = "notepad.exe";
    }
}

This matches closely the process you describe in your comment. It should work, although it's not how I would design a configurable Job model.

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If you want a different static backing store for each subclass, but want to be able to access the state from an instance, polymorphically, you can do something like this:

abstract class A
{
    public abstract string X { get; set; }
}

class D : A
{
    private static string _x;

    public override string X
    {
        get { return _x; }
        set { _x = value; }
    }
}

Different subclasses of A can provide their own implementation of X, including using a backing static store, if this is desirable. Note that this is not necessarily a good idea, as this kind of tricky global state (pretending to be an instance property) may make your code difficult to understand and maintain.

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This is an error because c is a generic type parameter, not a type. Static members are only accessible via types.

Is it alright if i replace the statement in question with a.x=10? If not, how is a.x different from c.x (or h.x where h is the subclass of a)?

You can indeed replace the statement with a.x=10;. As you observed, that means b.x, c.x, and d.x will all equal 10 as well.

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Except that x is string not int but that's a differrent story –  Rune FS Aug 26 '10 at 21:28

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