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I want to implement lazy initialization for multithreading in Java.
I have some code of the sort:

class Foo {
    private Helper helper = null;
    public Helper getHelper() {
        if (helper == null) {
            Helper h;
            synchronized(this) {
                h = helper;
                if (h == null) 
                    synchronized (this) {
                        h = new Helper();
                    } // release inner synchronization lock
                helper = h;
            } 
        }    
        return helper;
    }
    // other functions and members...
}

And I'm getting the the "Double-Checked Locking is Broken" declaration.
How can I solve this?

share|improve this question
    
Double-check locking has been fixed, check Effective Java 2nd Edition for more details on how to do this. –  gpampara Aug 26 '10 at 20:02
    
You don't need the inner synchronize statement in any case since you are already in one. –  Robin Aug 26 '10 at 20:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Here is the idiom recommended in the Item 71: Use lazy initialization judiciously of Effective Java:

If you need to use lazy initialization for performance on an instance field, use the double-check idiom. This idiom avoids the cost of locking when accessing the field after it has been initialized (Item 67). The idea behind the idiom is to check the value of the field twice (hence the name double-check): once without locking, and then, if the field appears to be uninitialized, a second time with locking. Only if the second check indicates that the field is uninitialized does the call initialize the field. Because there is no locking if the field is already initialized, it is critical that the field be declared volatile (Item 66). Here is the idiom:

// Double-check idiom for lazy initialization of instance fields
private volatile FieldType field;
FieldType getField() {
    FieldType result = field;
    if (result == null) { // First check (no locking)
        synchronized(this) {
            result = field;
            if (result == null) // Second check (with locking)
                field = result = computeFieldValue();
        }
    }
    return result;
}

This code may appear a bit convoluted. In particular, the need for the local variable result may be unclear. What this variable does is to ensure that field is read only once in the common case where it’s already initialized. While not strictly necessary, this may improve performance and is more elegant by the standards applied to low-level concurrent programming. On my machine, the method above is about 25 percent faster than the obvious version without a local variable.

Prior to release 1.5, the double-check idiom did not work reliably because the semantics of the volatile modifier were not strong enough to support it [Pugh01]. The memory model introduced in release 1.5 fixed this problem [JLS, 17, Goetz06 16]. Today, the double-check idiom is the technique of choice for lazily initializing an instance field. While you can apply the double-check idiom to static fields as well, there is no reason to do so: the lazy initialization holder class idiom is a better choice.

Reference

  • Effective Java, Second Edition
    • Item 71: Use lazy initialization judiciously
share|improve this answer

Here is a pattern for correct double-checked locking.

class Foo {

  private volatile HeavyWeight lazy;

  HeavyWeight getLazy() {
    HeavyWeight tmp = lazy; /* Minimize slow accesses to `volatile` member. */
    if (tmp == null) {
      synchronized (this) {
        tmp = lazy;
        if (tmp == null) 
          lazy = tmp = createHeavyWeightObject();
      }
    }
    return tmp;
  }

}

For a singleton, there is a much more readable idiom for lazy initialization.

class Singleton {
  private static class Ref {
    static final Singleton instance = new Singleton();
  }
  public static Singleton get() {
    return Ref.instance;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
A very interesting idea. Of course, it won't work in cases where you don't want to use the singleton pattern. –  Mike Baranczak Aug 26 '10 at 19:29
2  
the question is about a non static field. –  irreputable Aug 26 '10 at 19:47

The only way to do double-checked locking correctly in Java is to use "volatile" declarations on the variable in question. While that solution is correct, note that "volatile" means cache lines get flushed at every access. Since "synchronized" flushes them at the end of the block, it may not actually be any more efficient (or even less efficient). I'd recommend just not using double-checked locking unless you've profiled your code and found there to be a performance problem in this area.

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volatile isn't a must. –  irreputable Aug 26 '10 at 19:48
1  
I see your answer doesn't use volatile and is correct, but it's also likely no faster since it requires two objects and an extra memory fetch. The bottom line is still that double-checked locking is likely a marginal performance gain at best and you shouldn't bother with it unless your profiling shows it to be extremely performance-critical code... it's too easy to get wrong and/or introduce difficult-to-find problems for little gain. –  samkass Aug 27 '10 at 0:29
    
on average volatile read causes more memory fetches, because cache line is flushed. the presence of volatile kills optimization. if we change all our variables to volatile, out programs will crap out. –  irreputable Aug 27 '10 at 18:33

Define the variable that should be double-checked with volatile midifier

You don't need the h variable. Here is an example from here

class Foo {
    private volatile Helper helper = null;
    public Helper getHelper() {
        if (helper == null) {
            synchronized(this) {
                if (helper == null)
                    helper = new Helper();
            }
        }
        return helper;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

what do you mean, from whom you are getting the declaration?

Double-Checked Locking is fixed. check wikipedia:

public class FinalWrapper<T>
{
    public final T value;
    public FinalWrapper(T value) { this.value = value; }
}

public class Foo
{
   private FinalWrapper<Helper> helperWrapper = null;
   public Helper getHelper()
   {
      FinalWrapper<Helper> wrapper = helperWrapper;
      if (wrapper == null)
      {
          synchronized(this)
          {
              if (helperWrapper ==null)
                  helperWrapper = new FinalWrapper<Helper>( new Helper() );
              wrapper = helperWrapper;
          }
      }
      return wrapper.value;
   }
share|improve this answer
2  
Probably better off using volatile (although I haven't benchmarked it). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 26 '10 at 22:26
    
back it up please. –  irreputable Aug 27 '10 at 18:34

As a few have noted, you definitely need the volatile keyword to make it work correctly, unless all members in the object are declared final, otherwise there is no happens-before pr safe-publication and you could see the default values.

We got sick of the constant problems with people getting this wrong, so we coded a LazyReference utility that has final semantics and has been profiled and tuned to be as fast as possible.

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