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More of a syntax curiosity than a problem to solve...

I have two arrays of equal length, and want to iterate over them both at once - for example, to output both their values at a certain index.

@budget = [ 100, 150, 25, 105 ]
@actual = [ 120, 100, 50, 100 ]

I know that I can use each_index and index into the arrays like so:

@budget.each_index do |i|
  puts @budget[i]
  puts @actual[i]
end

Is there a Ruby way to do this better? Something like this?

# Obviously doesn't achieve what I want it to - but is there something like this?
[@budget, @actual].each do |budget, actual|
  puts budget
  puts actual
end
share|improve this question
1  
are both the arrays of equal sizes? –  Anurag Aug 26 '10 at 22:27
    
Yep - both known to be of the same length –  nfm Aug 26 '10 at 22:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 135 down vote accepted
>> @budget = [ 100, 150, 25, 105 ]
=> [100, 150, 25, 105]
>> @actual = [ 120, 100, 50, 100 ]
=> [120, 100, 50, 100]

>> @budget.zip @actual
=> [[100, 120], [150, 100], [25, 50], [105, 100]]

>> @budget.zip(@actual).each do |budget, actual|
?>   puts budget
>>   puts actual
>> end
100
120
150
100
25
50
105
100
=> [[100, 120], [150, 100], [25, 50], [105, 100]]
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9  
'.each' can unfold array elements? I wonder how much more of Ruby I don't know :/ –  Nikita Rybak Aug 26 '10 at 22:35
4  
If you're going to use an expression like that, it's always best to use parentheses for method calls, just in case. @budget.zip(@actual).each –  AboutRuby Aug 26 '10 at 22:48
1  
@AboutRuby: In this case, it's needed! Fixed. –  Marc-André Lafortune Aug 27 '10 at 6:19
1  
when i see ruby lines like this, i throw my hands in the air and wal round the room like a champ! –  Yasky Oct 14 '12 at 0:53
7  
Does this scale? If I have 2 10000 item arrays does this require making a 20,000 item array? The docs suggest this. –  Tom Andersen Dec 4 '12 at 14:15

Use the Array.zip method and pass it a block to iterate over the corresponding elements sequentially.

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In addition to a.zip(b).each{|x,y| } as others have said, you can also say [a,b].transpose.each{|x,y| }, which strikes me as a tiny bit more symmetrical. Probably not as fast, though, since you're creating the extra [a,b] array.

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7  
+1 One of the nice things about transpose is it raises an exception if the two arrays aren't the same length. –  Andrew Grimm Jan 13 '13 at 21:56

There is another way to iterate over two arrays at once using enumerators:

2.1.2 :003 > enum = [1,2,4].each
 => #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 4]:each> 
2.1.2 :004 > enum2 = [5,6,7].each
 => #<Enumerator: [5, 6, 7]:each> 
2.1.2 :005 > loop do
2.1.2 :006 >     a1,a2=enum.next,enum2.next
2.1.2 :007?>   puts "array 1 #{a1} array 2 #{a2}"
2.1.2 :008?>   end
array 1 1 array 2 5
array 1 2 array 2 6
array 1 4 array 2 7

Enumerators are more powerful than the examples used above, because they allow infinite series, parallel iteration, among other techniques.

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I'd go for making a hash from the two arrays and then iterating through the hash.

@budget = [ 100, 150, 25, 105 ]
@actual = [ 120, 100, 50, 100 ]

h = Hash[@budget.zip(@actual)]

h.each do |budget_key, actual_key| 
    puts "#{budget_key}  #{actual_key}"
end
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Related to the original question, for iterating over arrays of unequal length where you want the values to cycle around you can use

[1,2,3,4,5,6].zip([7,8,9].cycle)

and Ruby will give you

[[1, 7], [2, 8], [3, 9], [4, 7], [5, 8], [6, 9]]

This saves you from the nil values that you'll get from just using zip

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