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I know of const, that can't be changed after creation. But I was wondering if there is a way to declare a variable that you set only once and after that, can't overwrite. In my code, I would like to avoid the bool variable by having an nFirst that, once set to nIdx, can't be set to the new value of nIdx.

My code:

    int nFirst = 0;
    int nIdx = 0;
    bool bFound = false;
    BOOST_FOREACH(Foo* pFoo, aArray)
    {
        if (pFoo!= NULL)
        {
            pFoo->DoSmth();
            if (!bFound)
            {
                nFirst= nIdx;
                bFound = true;
            }
        }
        nIdx++;
    }
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5  
None built-in AFAIK, but you can roll your own class that does this quite easily. – Alexander Torstling Mar 4 at 16:09
    
No, it's not possible with standard features. – Eugene Sh. Mar 4 at 16:09
2  
You can create your own class for this. But the original boolean approach is what that class will have to use too, so there is no difference in performance. – Gill Bates Mar 4 at 16:09
1  
std::call_once, static variables or simply checking if it's already set to nIdx. Yeah, it does not stop you from assigning it to something else by accidents somewhere else in your code, but your case doesn't seem like it need that anyway. – Satus Mar 4 at 16:10
    
I also wish that C/C++ had a feature for making a variable const so that any code following (in program order in the current block) would not be able to modify it. Example: Class1 x; if (expr) { Class2 obj(); x = obj.f(); } else { x.doStuff(); } const x; /* Code following sees x as const Class1 */. – jotik Mar 4 at 18:58
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would like to avoid the bool variable

You can check nFirst itself, based on the fact that it won't be set a negative number. Such as:

int nFirst = -1;
int nIdx = 0;
BOOST_FOREACH(Foo* pFoo, aArray)
{
    if (pFoo != NULL)
    {
        pFoo->DoSmth();
        if (nFirst == -1)
        {
            nFirst = nIdx;
        }
    }
    nIdx++;
}
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1  
@eugenesh any variable with a const prefix cannot be altered, eg. const double pi=3.141592653; – Arif Burhan Mar 4 at 16:16
2  
This seems like the most straight forward approach and definetly avoids the boolean. Thank you! – tzippy Mar 4 at 16:18
    
also you can enum enum bool{false,true} enum color{red=1,blue=16,green=256} and you can have const enum or typedef enum. – Arif Burhan Mar 4 at 16:26
    
@tzippy accept the answer if it helped you solve your issue. – stellarossa Mar 4 at 17:04
3  
If the number can be negative, you can choose some other value to be your uninitialized value, e.g. std::numeric_limits<int>::max() or something. (If that's ever a legitimate value for your number, you probably shouldn't be using an int in the first place.) – Darrel Hoffman Mar 4 at 18:19

Pretty easy to roll your own.

template<typename T>
class SetOnce
{
public:
    SetOnce(T init) : m_Val(init)
    {}

    SetOnce<T>& operator=(const T& other)
    {
        std::call_once(m_OnceFlag, [&]()
        {
            m_Val = other;
        });

        return *this;
    }

    const T& get() { return m_Val; }
private:
    T m_Val;
    std::once_flag m_OnceFlag;
};

Then just use the wrapper class for your variable.

SetOnce<int> nFirst(0);
nFirst= 1;
nFirst= 2;
nFirst= 3;

std::cout << nFirst.get() << std::endl;

Outputs:

1

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1  
@Jarod42 Fixed, used a bool first to track it. – cocarin Mar 4 at 16:20

Your question is about avoiding the bool but also implies the need for const-ness.

To avoid the bool, I'd use a boost::optional like this:

boost::optional<int> nFirst;
// .. 
if (!nFirst) nFirst = nIdx;
// and now you can use *nFirst to get its value

Then, you can enforce logical (rather than literal) const-ness like this:

const boost::optional<int> nFirst;
// ..
if (!nFirst) const_cast<boost::optional<int>&>(nFirst) = nIdx;
// you can use *nFirst to get the value, any attempt to change it would cause a compile-time error

Using const_cast is not the safest practice, but in your particular case and as long as you only do it once it'd be OK. It simplifies both your code and your intentions: you do want a const, it's just that you want to defer it's initialisation for a bit.

Now, as songyuanyao suggested, you could directly use an int instead of a boost::optional, but the latter makes your intention explicit so I think it's better this way. In the end of day this is C++ while songyuanyao's solution is really a C-style one.

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3  
An optional doesn't really avoid a bool, it hides it inside another class. – jxh Mar 4 at 17:29
    
Isn't using const_cast to modify constant object undefined behavior? stackoverflow.com/q/14154382 – GingerPlusPlus Mar 5 at 14:32

Similar to cocarin's, but throws exception instead of silently ignoring assignment:

template <typename T, typename Counter = unsigned char>
class SetOnce {
public:
    SetOnce(const T& initval = T(), const Counter& initcount = 1):
        val(initval), counter(initcount) {}
    SetOnce(const SetOnce&) = default;
    SetOnce<T, Counter>& operator=(const T& newval) {
        if (counter) {
            --counter;
            val = newval;
            return *this;
        }
        else throw "Some error";
    }
    operator const T&() const { return val; } // "getter"
protected:
    T val;
    Counter counter;
};

Usage:

SetOnce<int> x = 42;
std::cout << x << '\n'; // => 42
x = 4;
// x = 5; // fails
std::cout << x << '\n'; // => 4

Online demo

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