Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In my current project I need to be able to have both editable and read-only versions of classes. So that when the classes are displayed in a List or PropertGrid the user is not able to edit objects they should not be allowed to.

To do this I'm following the design pattern shown in the diagram below. I start with a read-only interface (IWidget), and then create an edtiable class which implements this interface (Widget). Next I create a read-only class (ReadOnlyWidget) which simply wraps the mutable class and also implements the read only interface.

I'm following this pattern for a number of different unrelated types. But now I want to add a search function to my program, which can generate results that include any variety of types including both mutable and immutable versions. So now I want to add another set of interfaces (IItem, IMutableItem) that define properties which apply to all types. So IItem defines a set of generic immutable properties, and IMutableItem defines the same properties but editable. In the end a search will return a collection of IItems, which can then later be cast to more specific types if needed.

Yet, I'm not sure if I'm setting up the relationships to IMutable and IItem correctly. Right now I have each of the interfaces (IWidget, IDooHickey) inheriting from IItem, and then the mutable classes (Widget, DooHickey) in addition also implement IMutableItem.

Alternatively, I was also thinking I could then set IMutableItem to inherit from IItem, which would hide its read-only properties with new properties that have both get and set accessors. Then the mutable classes would implement IMutableItem, and the read-only classes would implement IItem.

I'd appreciate any suggestions or criticisms regarding any of this.

Class Diagram

alt text

Code

public interface IItem
{
    string ItemName { get; }
}

public interface IMutableItem
{
    string ItemName { get; set; }
}

public interface IWidget:IItem
{
    void Wiggle();
}

public abstract class Widget : IWidget, IMutableItem
{
    public string ItemName
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public void Wiggle()
    {
        //wiggle a little
    }
}

public class ReadOnlyWidget : IWidget
{
    private Widget _widget;
    public ReadOnlyWidget(Widget widget)
    {
        this._widget = widget;
    }

    public void Wiggle()
    {
        _widget.Wiggle();
    }

    public string ItemName
    {
        get {return  _widget.ItemName; }
    }
}

public interface IDoohickey:IItem
{
    void DoSomthing();
}


public abstract class Doohickey : IDoohickey, IMutableItem
{
    public void DoSomthing()
    {
        //work it, work it
    }

    public string ItemName
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class ReadOnlyDoohickey : IDoohickey
{
    private Doohickey _doohicky;
    public ReadOnlyDoohickey(Doohickey doohicky)
    {
        this._doohicky = doohicky;
    }

    public string ItemName
    {
        get { return _doohicky.ItemName; }
    }

    public void DoSomthing()
    {
        this._doohicky.DoSomthing();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I have been using the approach you described as an alternative (inherit IMutableItem from IItem and add there a property with get and set) in one of my project and it worked pretty well. You might also consider adding a method like SetXXX to IMutableItem instead of new property with setter (see stackoverflow.com/questions/623824/…). – ttil Jan 16 '12 at 23:37

Is it OK to create another object when you need a readonly copy? If so then you can use the technique in the included code. If not, I think a wrapper is probably your best bet when it comes to this.

internal class Test
{
    private int _id;
    public virtual int ID
    {
        get
        {
            return _id;
        }
        set
        {
            if (ReadOnly)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot set properties on a readonly instance.");
            }
        }
    }

    private string _name;
    public virtual string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return _name;
        }
        set
        {
            if (ReadOnly)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot set properties on a readonly instance.");
            }
        }
    }

    public bool ReadOnly { get; private set; }

    public Test(int id = -1, string name = null)
        : this(id, name, false)
    { }

    private Test(int id, string name, bool readOnly)
    {
        ID = id;
        Name = name;
        ReadOnly = readOnly;
    }

    public Test AsReadOnly()
    {
        return new Test(ID, Name, true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I would suggest that for each main class or interface, there be three defined classes: a "readable" class, a "changeable" class, and an "immutable" class. Only the "changeable" or "immutable" classes should exist as concrete types; they should both derive from an abstract "readable" class. Code which wants to store an object secure in the knowledge that it never changes should store the "immutable" class; code that wants to edit an object should use the "changeable" class. Code which isn't going to write to something but doesn't care if it holds the same value forever can accept objects of the "readable" base type.

The readable version should include public abstract methods AsChangeable(), AsImmutable(), public virtual method AsNewChangeable(), and protected virtual method AsNewImmutable(). The "changeable" classes should define AsChangeable() to return this, and AsImmutable to return AsNewImmutable(). The "immutable" classes should define AsChangeable() to return AsNewChangeable() and AsImmutable() to return this.

The biggest difficulty with all this is that inheritance doesn't work terribly well if one tries to use class types rather than interfaces. For example, if one would like to have an EnhancedCustomer class which inherits from BasicCustomer, then ImmutableEnhancedCustomer should inherit from both ImmutableBasicCustomer and ReadableEnhancedCustomer, but .net doesn't allow such dual inheritance. One could use an interface IImmutableEnhancedCustomer rather than a class, but some people would consider an 'immutable interace' to be a bit of a smell since there's no way a module that defines an interface in such a way that outsiders can use it without also allowing outsiders to define their own implementations.

share|improve this answer

Abandon hope all ye who enter here!!!

I suspect that in the long run your code is going to be very confusing. Your class diagram suggests that all properties are editable (or not) in a given object. Or are your (I'm)mutable interfaces introducing new properties that are all immutable or not, separate from the "core"/inheriting class?

Either way I think you're going to end up with playing games with property name variations and/or hiding inherited properties

Marker Interfaces Perhaps?
Consider making all properties in your classes mutable. Then implement IMutable (I don't like the name IItem) and IImutable as a marker interfaces. That is, there is literally nothing defined in the interface body. But it allows client code to handle the objects as a IImutable reference, for example.

This implies that either (a) your client code plays nice and respects it's mutability, or (b) all your objects are wrapped by a "controller" class that enforces the given object's mutability.

share|improve this answer

Could be too late :-), but the cause "The keyword 'new' is required on property because it hides property ..." is a bug in Resharper, no problem with the compiler. See the example below:

public interface IEntityReadOnly
{
    int Prop { get; }
}


public interface IEntity : IEntityReadOnly
{
    int Prop { set; }
}

public class Entity : IEntity
{
    public int Prop { get; set; }
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        var entity = new Entity();
        (entity as IEntity).Prop = 2;
        Assert.AreEqual(2, (entity as IEntityReadOnly).Prop);
    }
}

Same for the case without interfaces. The only limitation, you can't use auto-properties

public class User
{
    public User(string userName)
    {
        this.userName = userName;
    }

    protected string userName;
    public string UserName { get { return userName; } }
}

public class UserUpdatable : User
{
    public UserUpdatable()
        : base(null)
    {
    }

    public string UserName { set { userName = value; } }
}

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        var user = new UserUpdatable {UserName = "George"};
        Assert.AreEqual("George", (user as User).UserName);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.