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I'm trying to understand the rules of when this is lexically bound in an ES6 arrow function. Let's first look at this:

function Foo(other) {
    other.callback = () => { this.bar(); };

    this.bar = function() {
        console.log('bar called');
    };
}

When I construct a new Foo(other), a callback is set on that other object. The callback is an arrow function, and the this in the arrow function is lexically bound to the Foo instance, so the Foo won't be garbage collected even if I don't keep any other reference to the Foo around.

What happens if I do this instead?

function Foo(other) {
    other.callback = () => { };
}

Now I set the callback to a nop, and I never mention this in it. My question is: does the arrow function still lexically bind to this, keeping the Foo alive as long as other is alive, or may the Foo be garbage collected in this situation?

share|improve this question
2  
Given you don't reference this, I doubt that the JS engine would keep a reference to the Foo instance, however I don't have any proof for it. – Qantas 94 Heavy Mar 5 at 11:13
    
Wouldn't it depend on which engine runs this code? Or is garbage collection behaviour in the specs? – Kyll Mar 5 at 11:16
    
I guess, it just acting like a closure. function test(){ var x = 10; return function(){ console.log(x); } } – Rajaprabhu Aravindasamy Mar 5 at 11:17
    
I'd recommend ()=>{ this; }just mentioning this, doesn't have to do anything, if you want to take care this instance still sticks around. But why would you want that? Why would you want this instance to stay, if there's no other reference around so you (or any other part of your code) can access/use it? – Thomas Mar 5 at 11:20
    
@Thomas: Actually, I want the opposite: I want to make sure that such functions don't keep a garbage Foo around, and I don't know if I can rely on the JS engine to do the right thing or if I should use standard anonymous functions instead. – cfh Mar 5 at 11:23
up vote 32 down vote accepted

My question is: does the arrow function still lexically bind to this, keeping the Foo alive as long as other is alive, or may the Foo be garbage collected in this situation?

As far as the specification is concerned, the arrow function has a reference to the environment object where it was created, and that environment object has this, and that this refers to the Foo instance created by that call. So any code relying on that Foo not being kept in memory is relying on optimization, not specified behavior.

Re optimization, it comes down to whether the JavaScript engine you're using optimizes closures, and whether it can optimize the closure in the specific situation. (A number of things can prevent it.) The situation just like this with "normal" functions:

function Foo(other) {
    var t = this;
    other.callback = function() { };
}

In that situation, the function closes over the context containing t, and so in theory, has a reference to t which in turn keeps the Foo instance in memory.

That's the theory, but in practice a modern JavaScript engine can see that t is not used by the closure and can optimize it away provided doing so doesn't introduce an observable side-effect. Whether it does and, if so, when, is entirely down to the engine.

Since arrow functions truly are lexical closures, the situations are exactly analogous and so you'd expect the JavaScript engine to do the same thing: Optimize it away unless it causes a side-effect that can be observed. That said, remember that arrow functions are very new, so it may well be that engines don't have much optimization around this yet (no pun).

The version of V8 in Chrome (I'm using Chrome 48.0.2564.116 64-bit) does currently seem to do this: I ran Chrome in the mode that allows you to force garbage collection (google-chrome --js-flags="--expose-gc") and ran this:

"use strict";
function Foo(other) {
  other.callback = () => this; // <== Note the use of `this` as the return value
}
let a = [];
for (let n = 0; n < 10000; ++n) {
  a[n] = {};
  new Foo(a[n]);
}
// Let's keep a Foo just to make it easy to find in the heap snapshot
let f = new Foo({});

log("Done, check the heap");
function log(msg) {
    let p = document.createElement('p');
    p.appendChild(document.createTextNode(msg));
    document.body.appendChild(p);
}

In Dev Tools, taking a heap snapshot shows the expected 10,001 instances of Foo in memory. Then I executed gc() in the console (this is how you force garbage collection) and took another heap snapshot. The 10,001 Foo instances were still there:

enter image description here

Then I changed the callback so it didn't reference this:

    other.callback = () => {  }; // <== No more `this`

"use strict";

function Foo(other) {
  other.callback = () => {}; // <== No more `this`
}
let a = [];
for (let n = 0; n < 10000; ++n) {
  a[n] = {};
  new Foo(a[n]);
}
// Let's keep a Foo just to make it easy to find in the heap snapshot
let f = new Foo({});

log("Done, check the heap");
function log(msg) {
    let p = document.createElement('p');
    p.appendChild(document.createTextNode(msg));
    document.body.appendChild(p);
}

And ran the page again. I didn't even have to gc(), there was just the one Foo instance in memory (the one I put there to make it easy to find in the snapshot) when the code finished running:

enter image description here

I wondered if it were the fact that the callback is completely empty that allowed the optimization, and was pleasantly surprised to find that it wasn't: Chrome is happy to retain parts of the closure while letting go of this, as demonstrated here:

"use strict";
function Foo(other, x) {
  other.callback = () => x * 2;
}
let a = [];
for (let n = 0; n < 10000; ++n) {
  a[n] = {};
  new Foo(a[n], n);
}
// Let's keep a Foo just to make it easy to find in the heap snapshot
let f = new Foo({}, 0);
document.getElementById("btn-call").onclick = function() {
  let r = Math.floor(Math.random() * a.length);
  log(`a[${r}].callback(): ${a[r].callback()}`);
};
log("Done, click the button to use the callbacks");

function log(msg) {
  let p = document.createElement('p');
  p.appendChild(document.createTextNode(msg));
  document.body.appendChild(p);
}
<input type="button" id="btn-call" value="Call random callback">

Despite the fact that the callbacks are there and have their reference to x, Chrome optimizes the Foo instance away.


You asked about spec references for how this is resolved in arrow functions: The mechanism is spread throughout the spec. Each environment (such as the environment created by calling a function) has a [[thisBindingStatus]] internal slot, which is "lexical" for arrow functions. When determining the value of this, the internal operation ResolveThisBinding is used, which uses the internal GetThisEnviroment operation to find the environment that has this defined. When a "normal" function call is made, BindThisValue is used to bind the this for the function call if the environment is not a "lexical" environment. So we can see that resolving this from within an arrow function is just like resolving a variable: The current environment is checked for a this binding and, not finding one (because no this is bound when calling an arrow function), it goes to the containing environment.

share|improve this answer
    
That would be the expectation, but since this is in some sense magic, I was wondering if the exact same rules as for normal closures apply. (I didn't downvote this, ftr.) – cfh Mar 5 at 11:20
    
@cfh: this isn't magic. :-) The specification is clear about exactly how this works, including how arrow functions close over it. The mechanism is exactly the same as for other variables in the context. – T.J. Crowder Mar 5 at 11:23
    
That's good to know. Could you provide a reference to the relevant part of the spec? – cfh Mar 5 at 11:25
    
@cfh: It's all over, and the spec is very hard to read, but I've added some relevant sections above. – T.J. Crowder Mar 5 at 11:36
3  
This is the very model of a SO answer, thanks for your efforts. Accepting this now. – cfh Mar 5 at 16:45

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