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Consider the task of writing an indexable class which automatically synchronizes its state with some external data-store (e.g. a file). In order to do this the class would need to be made aware of changes to the indexed value which might occur. Unfortunately the usual approach to overloading operator[] does not allow for this, for example...

Type& operator[](int index)
{
    assert(index >=0 && index < size);
    return state[index];
}

I there any way to distinguish between a value being accessed and a value being modified?

Type a = myIndexable[2]; //Access
myIndexable[3] = a;  //Modification

Both of these cases occur after the function has returned. Is there some other approach to overloading operator[] which would perhaps make more sense?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

From the operator[] you can only really tell access.
Even if the external entity uses the non cost version this does not mean that a write will take place rather that it could take place.

As such What you need to do is return an object that can detect modification.
The best way to do this is to wrap the object with a class that overrides the operator=. This wrapper can then inform the store when the object has been updated. You would also want to override the operator Type (cast) so that a const version of the object can be retrieved for read accesses.

Then we could do something like this:

class WriteCheck;
class Store
{
  public:
  Type const& operator[](int index) const
  {
    return state[index];
  } 
  WriteCheck operator[](int index);
  void stateUpdate(int index)
  {
        // Called when a particular index has been updated.
  }
  // Stuff
};

class WriteCheck
{ 
    Store&  store;
    Type&   object;
    int     index;

    public: WriteCheck(Store& s, Type& o, int i): store(s), object(o), index(i) {}

    // When assignment is done assign
    // Then inform the store.
    WriteCheck& operator=(Type const& rhs)
    {
        object = rhs;
        store.stateUpdate(index);
    }

    // Still allow the base object to be read
    // From within this wrapper.
    operator Type const&()
    {
        return object;
    }   
};      

WriteCheck Store::operator[](int index)
{   
    return WriteCheck(*this, state[index], index);
}

An simpler alternative is:
Rather than provide the operator[] you provide a specific set method on the store object and only provide read access through the operator[]

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1  
Thank you to both you and Tony for excellent answers. I will need to explore your suggestion more fully but I like the idea. With regards to your simpler alternative... I agree however my goal was to provide a fully featured data type so forcing the client programmer to mix operator overloading and mutator member functions did not really appeal to me. –  DuncanACoulter Aug 27 '10 at 8:20

You can have (the non-const) operator[] return a proxy object that keeps a reference or pointer to the container, and in which operator= signals the container of the update.

(The idea of using const vs non-const operator[] is a red herring... you may know that you've just given away non-const access to the object, but you don't know if that access is still being used for a read or a write, when that write completes, or have any mechanism for updating the container thereafter.)

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1  
Thank you, I had my doubts about relying on the const version of the operator. –  DuncanACoulter Aug 27 '10 at 8:23

Return a proxy object which will have:

  • operator=(Type const &) overloaded for writes
  • operator Type() for reads
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Another elegant (IMHO) solution... Actually it is based on the fact that the const overload is called only when used on const object. Lets first create two [] overloads - as it is required, but using different locations:

Type& operator[](int index)
{
    assert(index >=0 && index < size);
    return stateWrite[index];
}
const Type& operator[](int index) const
{
    assert(index >=0 && index < size);
    return stateRead[index];
}

Now you should create a shadow reference of your object when you need to "read" it as follows:

const Indexable& myIndexableRead = myIndexable; // create the shadow
Type a = myIndexableRead[2]; //Access
myIndexable[3] = a;  //Modification

Creating this shadow declaration does not actually create anything in the memory. It just creates another name for your object with "const" access. It is all resolved at the compilation stage (including usage of const overload) and does not affect anything in runtime - neither memory nor performance.

And the bottom line - it is much more elegant (IMHO) than creating any assignment proxies, etc. I must state that the statement "From the operator[] you can only really tell access" is incorrect. According to the C++ Standard, returning dynamically allocatted object or global variable by reference is ultimate way to allow its direct modification, including [] overload case.

Following code has been tested:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class SafeIntArray {
    int* numbers;
    int size;
    static const int externalValue = 50;

public:
    SafeIntArray( unsigned int size = 20 ) {
        this->size = size;
        numbers = new int[size];
    }
    ~SafeIntArray() {
        delete[] numbers;
    }

    const int& operator[]( const unsigned int i ) const {
        if ( i < size )
            return numbers[i];
        else
            return externalValue;
    }

    int& operator[]( const unsigned int i ) {
        if ( i < size )
            return numbers[i];
        else
            return *numbers;
    }

    unsigned int getSize() { return size; }
};

int main() {

    SafeIntArray arr;
    const SafeIntArray& arr_0 = arr;
    int size = arr.getSize();

    for ( int i = 0; i <= size ; i++ )
        arr[i] = i;

    for ( int i = 0; i <= size ; i++ ) {
        cout << arr_0[i] << ' ';
    }
    cout << endl;

    return 0;
}

And the results are:

20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 50

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Is the user now obliged to to use this "shadow reference" when they read from the object? I would prefer it if the object handled the distinction between read and write without placing any burden on the user. If the user needs to modify their behaviour for reads versus writes then they may as well use separate accessor and mutator functions. –  DuncanACoulter Feb 25 '14 at 15:02
    
Look, the purpose here was using indexer overloading allowing separate implementation of accessor or mutator. There is no other way than either creating a proxy class for mutator (i.e. = overloading) like stated in the answers before me. However I feel this solution a bit ugly and anyway it requires using different constructions for mutating/accessing. Another way is the one I propose - using 'const' differentiation for [] overloading. This differentiation has its C++ requirements - as I explained above. –  dzilbers Feb 27 '14 at 7:42
    
Of those advocating the const based differentiation approach yours was the most detailed so +1 for that. I personally favour the proxy approach however. –  DuncanACoulter Feb 27 '14 at 9:33
    
I agree - that's a matter of personal taste and preference. In general I believe that programming is an art :) –  dzilbers Feb 28 '14 at 10:08

in the access example you give you can get a distinction by using a const version:

const Type& operator [] ( int index ) const;

on a sidenote, using size_t as index gets rid of the need for checking if index >= 0

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