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It's pretty nice to sort a dataset by a number of filters and get the results shown instantly, right?
My solution to do this would be to POST the "filter" (read forms) parameters to a page called dataset.php, which returns the appropriate dataset in compiled HTML, that can be loaded straight into my page.

So, besides this being a total no-no for SEO and for people having deactivated Javascript, It appears as a quite good solution to easily build on in the future.

However, I have yet not the experience to consider it a good or bad overall solution. What should be our concerns with an AJAX-fetched dataset?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So, besides this being a total no-no for SEO and for people having deactivated Javascript, It appears as a quite good solution to easily build on in the future.

Not entirely true, there are solutions out there like jQuery Ajaxy which enable AJAX content with History tracking while remaining SEO and javascript disabled friendly. You can see this in action on my own site Balupton.com with evidence it's still SEO friendly here.

However, I have yet not the experience to consider it a good or bad overall solution. What should be our concerns with an AJAX-fetched dataset?

Having Ajax loaded content is great for the user experience it's fast quick and just nice to look at. If you don't have history tracking then it can be quite confusing especially if you are using ajax loaded content for things like pages, rather than just sidebar content - as then you break away from consistency users are experienced with. Another caveat is Google Analytics tracking for the Ajax pages. These shortcomings, those you've already mentioned as well as some others mentioned elsewhere are all quite difficult problems.

jQuery Ajaxy (as mentioned before) provides a nice high level solution for nearly all the problems, but can be a big learning curve if you haven't worked with Controller architecture yet but most people get it rather quickly.

For instance, to enable history trackable ajax content for changing a set of results using jQuery Ajaxy, you don't actually need any server side changes. You could do something like this at the bottom of your page: $('#results ul.pages li.page a').addClass('ajaxy ajaxy-resultset').ajaxify();

Then setup a Ajaxy controller like so to fetch just the content we want from the response:

        'resultset': {
            selector: '.ajaxy-resultset',
            request: function(){
                // Hide Content
                $result.stop(true,true).fadeOut(400);
                // Return true
                return true;
            },
            response: function(){
                // Prepare
                var Ajaxy = $.Ajaxy; var data = this.State.Response.data; var state = this.state;
                // Show Content
                var Action = this;
                var newResultContent = $(data.content).find('#result').html();
                $result.html(newResultContent).fadeIn(400,function(){
                    Action.documentReady($result);
                });
                // Return true
                return true;
            }
        }

And that's all there is too it, with most of the above being just copy and pasted code from the demonstration page. Of course this isn't ideal as we return the entire page in our Ajax responses, but this would have to happen anyway. You can always upgrade the script a bit more, and make it so on the server side you check for the XHR header, and if that is set (then we are an ajax request) so just render the results part rather than everything.

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This is a great answer with fantastic example. Thanks a lot balupton! –  Industrial Aug 27 '10 at 10:47
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You already named the 2 big ones. Now all you need to do is make sure all the functionality works without javascript (reload the page with the requested dataset), and use AJAX to improve it (load the requested dataset without reloading the page).

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This largely depends on the context. In some cases people today may expect the results to be delivered instantly without the page refreshing itself. It does also improve overall user-experience - again, this largely depends on the context.

However, it does also have its pitfalls. Would the user have a need to return to the previous pages after the ajax content was delivered? Since this may not be as simple as pressing the Back button in the browser.

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