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Is there any way to get the text of the selector that invoked some function (if it exists) from within the function?

For example

$('#foo, .bar').click(function() {

   // Here I want to figure out if there was a match on #foo, or .bar

});

Basically I want to have a compounded selector like the one above (http://api.jquery.com/multiple-selector/) but be able to know which one was matched when I get inside the function.

share|improve this question
    
To add some more detail as to why I want to do this: Normally I could do something like $('#foo').click(...) and $('.bar').click(...) but that would make jquery search the DOM twice. I assume combining the two would be much faster as only 1 (slightly more complex) search is made instead of two. Thus by knowing which selector was matched, I could have 1 search being used to invoke various other distinct functions. –  mrkcsc Aug 27 '10 at 8:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can get that info with the event object.

$('#foo, .bar').click(function(event) {

   if(event.target.id === 'foo'){
      alert('foo');
   }
   else if(event.target.className === 'bar'){
      alert('bar');
   }

});

Example: http://www.jsfiddle.net/8CACU/

Ref.: http://api.jquery.com/event.target/

share|improve this answer
    
Would there be any way to distinguish selectors if you didn't necessarily know what they were beforehand or they were more complex? EG: selector string being constructed programatically or one like $('#foo > .bar > input, '#foo > .boo > input') In a case like that it would require a lot more effort to infer which one was matched. –  mrkcsc Aug 27 '10 at 8:34
    
@mrkcsc: In your "more complex" example, you still would only look for event.target.tagName === 'INPUT'. Your only way to distinguish is over the event object since your event handler is attached to each element. –  jAndy Aug 27 '10 at 8:38
    
Both selectors are on the input tagname though so you would have to do some additional checks to figure out which one of the two it was. I had a feeling this was my only option though and as you say it is pretty much my only choice so I'll mark it as the answer, thanks for the help. –  mrkcsc Aug 27 '10 at 8:42
    
@mrkcsc: I guess you can avoid this problem completly. Sure, there might be times where you need to figure which element was clicked (but mostly on event delegation). I don't know why you need to go this way, but I'm sure you can change your logic/code to avoid it. –  jAndy Aug 27 '10 at 9:17
    
I can, as I commented originally, I just wanted to do it for performance reasons to minimize the number of times the DOM was searched (through one large compounded selector). –  mrkcsc Aug 27 '10 at 9:29

You can use $(this) inside the callback to get the actual element and access the attribute of the element that is used in the selector.

$('#foo, .bar').click(function() { 
    if($(this).attr('id') == 'foo')  {
        alert('foo handled');
    } else if($(this).hasClass('bar')) {
        alert('bar handled');
    }
});

jsfiddle sample: http://jsfiddle.net/us8r9/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this is similar solution as posted by jAndy. I was wondering if there was a way to access the selector text directly instead of having to infer it using the this or event object, but it seems not. –  mrkcsc Aug 27 '10 at 8:45
$('#foo, .bar').click(GOTEMM(event) {

   if(event.target.id === 'foo'){
      alert('foo');
   }
   elseif(event.target.className === 'bar'){
      alert('bar');
   }

});
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